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HANOVER 

COOK • BOOK 




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THIKD EDITION REVISED 
AND ENLARGED 



FAVORITE RECIPES 

COMPILED AND PUBLISHED BY 
COMMITTEE OF LADIES FROM 
THE LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 
HANOVEK, ■ PENNSYLVANIA 



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COMMITTEE OF ARRANGEMENTS. 



*MRS. W. W. HAFER. 
MRS. C. E. MOUL. 
MRS. H. S. EHRHART. 
MRS. WALTER W. SHULTZ. 
MRS. G. D. GITT. 
MRS. C. P. WOLCOTT. 

♦Deceased. 



DEC 26 '22 



©CI A692539 

1A«> I 



COPYRIGHTED 
December 1922 \ 
Hanover Library Association 



ANTHONY PRINTING COMPANY 
HANOVER 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

Soups 8 

Fish, Oysters, and Sauces . . 19 

Meats 38 

Eggs 58 

Fruits, etc 63 

Vegetables, Cheese Dishes, and Noodles 65 

Salads and Dressings 82 

Pickels, etc 94 

Breads, Rolls, Sandwiches, etc 107 

Waffles and Muffins 12-1 

Puddings 132 

Pudding Sauces 146 

Desserts 148 

Pastry and Pies : 155 

Icings and Cake Fillings 167 

Large and Small Cakes 170 

Canning 216 

Preserving 218 

Ice Cream, Ices, etc. ..." 223 

Pennsylvania German Dishes 228 

Candies 238 

Beverages t 246 

Chafing Dish Recipes 250 

Miscellaneous 253 

Care of the Baby, and Cookery for the Sick . . 261 

Fireless Cooker 265 

Index 273 



8 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



Soups 



SOUP STOCK. 

Beef is the best meat for making good stock, as 
it contains the most nourishment. A shank bone 
should be well cracked (that the marrow may be ex- 
tracted). Put on to cook in cold water, allowing 
a full quart for every pound of beef, and by very 
gradual heat come to a slow simmer, which should 
be kept up five or six hours. Soup, on no account, 
should be allowed to boil, except for the last fifteen 
minutes to cook vegetables in finishing. For the first 
hour of simmering, it should be frequently skimmed. 
Bits of left over meats may also be used for stock. 
As a flavoring, celery seed, a piece of bay leaf, a 
red pepper pod, horse-radish root, mushroom par- 
ings or onion may be added at discretion. 

If soup has been over-salted use a teaspoonful of 
sugar and a tablespoonful of vinegar. 

THICKENING FOR SOUPS— BIGNE ZOUPA. 

One pint water, rind of one lemon, two small 
pieces cinnamon. Boil five minutes; then add 
flour to boiling water until stiff as dough and boil 
about fifteen minutes, stirring constantly; Turn 
out on a plate to cool; then add from three to five 
eggs and pound into the cooled flour mixture with 
potato masher until thoroughly mixed; then break 
off in pieces about the size of small marble and 
fry quickly in deep fat. Can be used in any kind 
of hot broth. 

Guerina Fayqueosta. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 9 



EGG SOUP. . 

Crumb stale bread until you have as much as is 
desired and brown in plenty of butter. Do not have 
the bread too fine and stir it continually while 
browning. Then bake one egg over browned bread 
and stir a short time longer. Remove into tureen 
and pour water into pan, salting well, and when it 
boils pour over bread. Have enough to cover and 
eat at once. Especially nice for the sick. 

Mrs. A. H. Secrist. 

CIDER SOUP. 

Boil three pints of cider, skim, put one-half 
cup sugar in cider, take two cups of bread cut 
in dice, brown in butter, take two eggs, beat well, 
add two tablespoonfuls of sugar, two tablespoonfuls 
of flour, one and one-half cups of milk, few whole 
allspice, add to boiling cider. Stir browned bread 
in mixture last. M. V. R. 

BEAN SOUP. 

Soak the beans over night, put beef or ham bones 
over fire with cold water to cover. Let come to boil 
with the beans. When quite soft strain through a 
wire sieve and put back to broth. Season with salt 
and pepper to taste. 

OLD FASHIONED BEAN SOUP. 

Boil a ham bone with one pint of soup beans and 
add two or three onions. Mrs. M. J. Bowman. 

CREAM OF PEA SOUP. 

One pint of canned peas, one quart of milk, one 
tablespoonful of butter, two tablespoonfuls of flour, 
salt and pepper to taste. Press the peas through a 
colander. Put the milk on to boil; as soon as it boils 
add the peas. Rub the flour and butter together, 
add them to the boiling soup, and stir constantly 
until it thickens. Add salt and pepper and serve at 
once. Mrs. C. E. Ehrehart. 



10 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



CLAM CHOWDER. 

Three dozen clams, eight large potatoes, three 
good sized onions, six tomatoes, six hard boiled eggs, 
butter size of a walnut, one quart milk, a little pars- 
ley. Put clams through a meat grinder and boil 
separately for five minutes. Boil potatoes which 
have been cut in cubes with the tomatoes and onions. 
Then add butter, parsley, clams, eggs and milk. 
Don't allow it to boil after milk is added. 

Mrs. S. L. Bixler. 

CLAM CHOWDER. 

Twenty-five clams, chopped; four large raw po- 
tatoes, blocked; one onion, cut fine; one can of to- 
mato soup or four fresh tomatoes; four hard boiled 
eggs, blocked; one-fourth pound of butter; a dash 
of red pepper and a very little salt. 

Boil clams, potatoes and onion about one-half 
hour, or until potatoes are soft. Add the rest of 
the ingredients and just before serving add one pint 
of milk or cream. 

Mrs. T. J. O'Neill. 

CLAM CHOWDER. 

Take twenty-five clams, put through grinder, 
strain liquor, add enough water to boil clams, take 
six potatoes and dice them, one pint tomatoes, one 
onion, six hard boiled eggs, one-fourth pound butter, 
parsley, salt and pepper to taste. Last add one pint 
sweet milk, take from fire so milk doesn't boil after 
being added. Boil clams about one-half hour before 
adding the other ingredients, put onion and tomatoes 
through grinder, add enough water to make about 
three quarts of chowder. 

Mrs. C. S. S. 

CLAM CHOWDER. 

One quart and one pint of diced potatoes, 2 small 
tomatoes cut fine, one small onion, parsley, salt 
and pepper; add ail together in enough water to boil 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



11 



until soft. One and one-half dozen large or two 
dozen small clams cut very fine, boil fifteen minutes 
separately, add to the above mixture and boil all 
together for five minutes, then add one-fourth pound 
butter and one quart milk. If too strong, with 
clams add more milk. Add lastly 2 hard boiled eggs. 

Mrs. C. W. Plowman. 

RIVEL SOUP. 

For small family one egg, flour enough to rivel it, 
salt to taste. Drop into milk or beef broth. 

Mrs. George Sunday. 

MILK RIVEL SOUP. 

Two quarts of sweet milk heated to boiling point, 
then add the rivels, made of three eggs mixed with 
flour enough to make rivels not too dry. When the 
rivels come to the top they are done. Beef rivel 
soup is made the same only use beef broth instead 
of milk. 

Mrs. M. J. Bowman. 

RIVEL SOUP. 

Boil beef, one-fourth head cabbage, one onion, 
two tomatoes and one carrot for three hours; strain 
and add rivels. 

Rivels. — One egg and one cup flour. Put flour in 
bowl and add eggs cut with knife until mixed, add 
to broth and boil five minutes. Rice can be used 
instead of rivels. 

Mrs. Charles Althoff. 
CALF'S HEAD SOUP. 

One calf's head boiled and cut fine; boil the brains 
separately; two pounds of veal chopped fine for the 
meat balls, mixed with a little pepper, salt and lemon, 
three tablespoonfuls of flour and one of butter, for 
the butter balls; four tablespoonfuls of browned 
flour, and one of lard for the flour balls; four eggs 
boiled hard and cut fine; also four potatoes cut into 



12 



HAXOVER COOK BOOK. 



dice; pepper and salt to taste; two teaspoonfuls of 
cinnamon; one teaspoonful of cloves; one nutmeg ; 
two teaspoonfuls of cooking bouquet ; and six quarts 
of water. 

Mrs. Merle D. Bihsop. 
TOMATO SOUP WITH STOCK. 

One quart of stock, one can of tomatoes, salt, 
pepper and sugar to taste, stew and strain tomatoes, 
add to boiling stock, season and simmer for ten 
minutes, serve with croutons. 

TOMATO SOUP WITHOUT STOCK. 

Stew together for ten minutes one can tomatoes, 
one pint water, one teaspoonful salt, one tablespoon- 
ful sugar, five cloves, one-half teaspoonful pepper, 
one tablespoonful of chopped onion and one table- 
spoonful of chopped parsley. Rub through a sieve, 
return to the fire and thicken with one tablespoonful 
of butter and one tablespoonful of flour rubbed to- 
gether and stirred in. Serve with croutons. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

Stew tomatoes. When they are soft strain through 
a soup strainer until there is nothing left but the 
seeds. Measure a pint of the liquid. Add one tea- 
spoonful of salt, one saltspoonful of pepper, one-half 
saltspoonful of soda, a little onion and set on the 
stove to heat slowly. Meanwhile make a white sauce, 
one tablespoonful of butter, one of flour and one 
pint milk, thus: set the milk on the fire in a sauce 
pan to heat, put the butter and flour into another 
pan on the fire and stir gently until the butter melts; 
let them bubble together two or three minutes, then 
pour in milk, a little at a time, until all is used; stir 
it so it will be smooth until it bubbles; add the toma- 
to to this sauce, strain all again, return to the fire 
and serve as soon as steaming hot. 

M. Bertha Zeiber. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 13 



CREAM OF TOMATO SOUP. 

Take one quart of tomatoes (fresh or canned) to 
one pint of water, boil until soft, mash through col- 
ander. Mix smooth, four tablespoons of flour with 
one quart milk, salt and butter. Boil chopped 
onions and celery with the above. Add a pinch of 
baking soda and serve. 

Mrs. V. K. Jordan. 

TOMATO CREAM SOUP. 

Heat one quart of strained stewed tomatoes to 
boiling point, add two tablespoonfuls flour, mixed 
in a little cold water; let tomatoes boil until thick- 
ened, stirring constantly; add salt to taste. 

Have ready one cup of rich hot milk or cream, add 
to tomatoes and let all boil together for a minute or 
two. Serve with browned bread crumbs if desired. 
A teaspoonful of celery salt adds very much to the 
taste. Mrs. Etzler. 

CREAM OF CELERY SOUP. 

Chop very fine one large bunch of celery, simmer 
in water until tender; take a lump of butter size of a 
walnut and a tablespoonful of flour; stir over fire 
until thoroughly mixed. Then stir it into the celery. 
Thin with milk until the right consistency. Season 
to taste. Mrs. C. J. Gitt. 

ASPARAGUS SOUP. 

Boil one quart of asparagus, cut into one inch 
lengths in one quart water until tender; put through 
a colander and return to the water in which it was 
boiled; heat one pint milk, stir in it one tablespoon- 
ful butter, rubbed with one tablespoonful of flour, 
and cook a few minutes; season and pour it into the 
asparagus; when boiling hot pour over bits of toasted 
bread, cut into dice, and serve at once. 

Mrs. W. L. G. 



14 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



VEGETABLE SOUP. 

For twelve o'clock dinner put medium size shin 
bone on fire at nine o'clock: add little celery, parsley 
and onion: let boil slowly till one hour before serv- 
ing; add vegetables, tomato, rice, green beans 
peas, etc., boil slowly until time to serve. 

POTATO PUREE. 

Three cups mashed potatoes, one small onion, 
two large tablespoonfuls butter rolled in one of flour, 
two quarts boiling water, two eggs, two stalks celery, 
salt and pepper. Put potatoes, chopped onion and 
celery with hot water over the fire, season and cook 
gently for one-half hour, stirring often to prevent 
scorching; strain and rub through a soup strainer, 
return to kettle with parsley and floured butter, 
stir until it boils. Heat in another vessel the milk, 
turn upon the beaten eggs, mix well, add to the con- 
tents of kettle, stir over fire for one minute. 

Mrs. T. J. Little. 

TURTLE SOUP. 

Boil turtle until tender, then separate meat from 
bones and chop fine; next strain broth in which tur- 
tle was cooked, and add one and one-half quarts 
potatoes, cut into dice, one can tomatoes, one quart 
corn, one-half cup rice, one-fourth, cup parsley chop- 
ped fine. Corn and parsley are not added until soup 
is almost finished. Season with red, black pepper 
and salt. Take lump butter and two tablespoonfuls 
flour, cream together, add slowly to broth. Then 
last chop four hard boiled eggs fine and add. 

Mary Zinn. 

CORX SOUP. 

Boil shin bone. To stock add one pint granted 
corn and 1 pint of corn cut from cob, two tablespoon- 
fuls sugar, dash of cayenne pepper, salt to taste. 
Thicken with one egg stirred in one tablespoonful 
flour. Mrs. Paul A. Hoke- 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 15 



CORN SOUP WITHOUT MEAT. 

One can of corn, two cups of milk, one quart of 
boiling water, two eggs, three tablespoonsful of but- 
ter, rolled in as much flour, one tablespoonful of 
chopped parsley, pepper and salt to taste. _ Put the 
corn into a quart of boiling water and stir in the 
floured butter. Scald the milk in a separate vessel 
(dropping in a tiny bit of soda) pour it slowly on 
the beaten eggs, keeping the egg-beater going all 
the time; add to the soup, stir for one minute, put 
in the parsley, salt and pepper to taste. 

Mrs. D. Guy Holllinger. 

GREEN CORN SOUP. 

One pint grated corn, one quart milk, two table- 
spoonfuls of butter mixed with the same quantity 
of flour. One small onion and parsley, one-half 
teaspoonful of pepper. Salt to taste. Cook the 
corn in water thirty minutes, then add the boiling 
milk with the creamed butter and flour. 

Miss Zeiber. 

CREAM OF CORN SOUP. 

Chop one can of corn, add one pint of boiling water 
and simmer for twenty minutes, then rub through a 
seive. Scald one pint of milk with a slice of onion, 
remove the onion and add milk to the corn. Thicken 
with two tablespoonfuls of flour and two tablespoon- 
fuls of butter rubbed to a paste. Season with one 
teaspoonful of salt and a dash of pepper. 

Mrs. R. L. Ehrhart. 

CHICKEN CORN SOUP. 

Boil chicken till tender; remove bones and pick 
the meat fine; make a smooth dough of one egg and 
one and one-half cups of flour; roll out and cut into 
dice; score and cut off the corn from six ears; put all 
into the chicken broth and boil together till corn is 
soft. Mrs. Jacob Trone. 



16 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



OYSTER SOUP. 

One quart oysters (put through grinder). Boil 
for a few minutes. Salt and pepper to taste. Add 
one tablespoonful flour worked in a good sized lump 
of butter. Add milk or cream until thick enough. 
When ready to remove from stove, add 6 hard boiled 
eggs, chopped fine. 

Mrs. Paul A. Hoke. 

OYSTER SOUP. 

Take a quart of milk, let it come to a boil, thicken 
with corn starch, add a pint of oysters, add salt, 
pepper and butter and stew until curled. 

A. F. Barker. 

OYSTER BOUILLON. 

Wash and chop fifty good-sizes oysters, put in a 
double boiler, cover and cook slowly one hour; add 
one pint of water, one level teaspoonful of celery 
seed; strain through two thicknesses of cheese cloth, 
reheat, add a level teaspoonful of butter and serve. 

Edith-Gitt Bilmeyer. 

NOODLE SOUP. 

Take a quart of flour, four eggs, a pinch of salt; 
work into a stiff dough; roll out very thin, lay aside 
for an hour, then roll into a tight roll and cut very 
thin and lay aside to dry. Drop noodles into chicken 
or beef broth and boil twenty minutes. 

Mrs. Bortner. 

NOODLES FOR SOUP. 

Beat up one egg, add a pinch of salt and flour 
enough to make a stiff dough; roll out in a very thin 
sheet; dredge with flour to keep from sticking; then 
roll up tightly; begin at one end and shave down 
fine like cabbage for slaw. 

Miss Emily J. Young. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 17 



CREAM OF CORN SOUP. 

Two knuckles of veal, one pint of grated corn or 
one can of cornlet, one cup of hot milk two table- 
spoonfuls of butter, three tablespoonfuls of flour, 
yolks of two eggs, one small onion, one bay leaf, salt 
and pepper to taste. Put the knuckles into a soup 
kettle with four quarts of cold water and salt, place 
on a moderate fire and bring slowly to a boil, then 
skim, simmer gently for four hours, then strain, 
put stock into kettle again and when it boils add 
corn, boil about ten minutes, add butter, then flour 
which has been mixed with water, stir until it thick- 
ens, then add boiling milk, cook one minute, then 
add the beaten yolks, and serve immediately. 

Emma S. Shirk. 

MOCK TURTLE SOUP. 

Take a calf's head, when it is scraped and scalded, 
crack it and take out the brains. Then put into 
salted water over night; boil in two gallons of water 
until you can take out the bones; cut the head and 
tongue into small pieces; have ready a dozen and a 
half force balls made of veal, browned in butter, 
two tablespoonfuls browned flour, two onions, a 
little mace, pepper and salt. Strain the soup after 
which let come to a boil, adding the brains and 
force balls. 

Mrs. Nancy Hersh Yeager. 

MUTTON BROTH. 

To one pound of lean mutton allow a quart of 
water, boil slowly for two or three hours, season it 
with a little salt and some parsley. Veal or chicken 
broth may be made in the same way. 

Mrs. G. T. Himes. 

MARYLAND TERRAPINS. 

Wash four terrapins in warm water, then throw 
into pot boiling water which will kill them instantly, 



18 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



allow to boil until shells crack then take them out 
and remove the bottom shell; cut each quarter sepa- 
rate, take the gall from the liver remove the eggs 
put the pieces in a sacuepan, pour in all the liquor 
and cover with water, put in salt, cayenne and black 
pepper, and a little mace; a little butter and let 
them stew for one-half hour; just before taking 
from fire stir in a little flour thickening. Drop 
the eggs in just as you serve it. 

Mrs. H. D. S. 

MOCK BISQUE SOUP. 

One can tomatoes, one quart milk, one-third cup 
butter, three tablespoonfuls flour, one-fourth tea- 
spoonful soda, pepper and salt; stew tomatoes until 
soft enough to strain easily and use the strained 
juice. Heat the milk in a double boiler; heat the 
butter and add the flour to it, adding enough of the 
milk to make it pour easily; add this to the milk 
and cook for ten minutes, stirring occasionally; 
to the strained tomato add the soda to prevent acid 
from curdling the milk; when the gas has passed off 
add the tomatoes to milk; season and serve im- 
mediately with croutons. 

E. Bucher. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 19 



Fish, Oysters and Sauces 



Halibut., salmon, bass, bluefish, shad, etc., one hour. 
Trout, pickerel, white fish, etc., for one-half hour. 



To be eatable, fish should be perfectly fresh — the 
eyes clear, the gills red, the scales bright, the flesh 
firm and free from any unpleasant odor, and to se- 
cure the best flavor, should be cooked as soon as pos- 
sible after leaving the sea, river or pond. They should 
be scaled and cleaned as soon as they come from the 
market, washed quickly without soaking, or remov- 
ing the smallest atom of blood. Sprinkle salt on the 
inside and put in a cold place until wanted. 

If necessary to keep them over night place where 
the moon will not shine on them as the effect is as 
bad as the hot sunshine. Cod, haddock and hali- 
but may be kept a day before using, but mackerel 
and whitefish lose their life as soon as they leave 
the water. A. F. Barker. 



Boil. 



Halibut and Salmon 
Bluefish and Bass. . 
Cod and Haddock. . 



per pound, 15 minutes 
per pound, 10 minutes 
per pound, 8 minutes 



Bake 



Fish Suggestions. 



20 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



BAKED SHAD OR ANY LARGE FISH. 

Clean, rinse and wipe dry; fill with three cups 
dry bread crumbs, into which has been rubbed one- 
half cup butter; salt and pepper. Tie the fish up 
and rub both sides with cracker crumbs or flour. 
Pour over it drawn butter, or place small pieces of 
butter on the fish. Put in a hot pan and bake an 
hour and one-half. 

Mrs. George T. Kerr. 

BAKED SHAD. 

Fill the body of the fish with a dressing of one cup 
of stale bread crumbs, one tablespoonful of melted 
butter, half teaspoonful of salt and a little pepper. 
Sew it up, score the upper part, dredge thickly with 
salt, pepper and flour. Place in a greased pan and 
bake fifteen minutes to every pound of fish. 

Mrs. J. S. Moul. 

PLANKED SHAD. 

Take an oak board, clean it well. Stand board 
before the fire until it is very hot but not charred. 
Then take your shad, which you have previously 
cleaned, wipe dry, and split down the back, and after 
seasoning with salt and a little pepper, fasten it to 
the board, skin side down, and stand it up before 
the fire, head down. When the juice has started 
reverse the position, and continue to thus change 
the position until the fish is thoroughly cooked. Care 
must be taken to prevent burning. When done 
butter it and place it on the table without removing 
it from the board. A. F. Barker. 

BROILED FISH. 

Wash and drain the fish. Sprinkle with pepper 
and lay with the inside down upon the gridiron, and 
broil over fresh bright coals. When a nice brown 
turn for a moment on the other side, then take 
and spread with butter. This is a very nice way of 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 21 



broiling all kinds of fish, fresh or salted. A little 
smoke under the fish adds to its flavor. This may 
be made by putting 2 or 3 cobs under the gridiron. 
Season before or after cooking. 

A. F. Barker. 

HALIBUT EN COQUILLE. 

Butter several scallop shells, and lay in them a 
round piece of halibut, about an inch thick a little 
smaller than the shell. Cook together two table- 
spoonsful of butter and one of flour and add gradu- 
ally milk enough to make a thick sauce, season highly 
with salt and cayenne and a little onion juice if 
liked. The scallop shells containing fish should be 
set in a steamer over hot water and cooked until 
tender, then covered with sauce; garnish with water 
cress before sending to table. 

Mrs. Clinton J. Gitt. 

FISH CROQUETTES. 

Cream two tablespoonfuls of flour and two table- 
spoonfuls of butter; put one cup of milk into double 
boiler, when at boiling point add the flour and but- 
ter; stir until smooth and thick, add salt and pepper 
and fish flaked; spread on a platter and let cool. 
Then shape, roll into flour, egg and crumbs and fry 
in deep fat. Arrange on hot dish, garnish with pars- 
ley and sliced lemon. 

Mrs. V. K. Jordan. 
SALMON CROQUETTES. 

One can of salmon, three tablespoonfuls flour, 
two eggs, butter the size of an egg; cream butter 
and flour together and add eggs, pour on one and 
one-half cups boiling water, put in double boiler and 
boil until perfectly stiff; add a little salt to salmon ; 
then enough mixture and cracker crumbs, to form 
into croquettes. Swim in lard. 

Mrs. Dr. Hollinger. 



22 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



SALMON CROQUETTES. 

Cut fine one good size onion, a little parsley, one 
can of salmon and one hard boiled egg; add three 
tablespoonfuls of milk, and one beaten egg; mix 
well, roll in cracker dust and swim in hot fat. 

Mrs. Harry Stair. 

SALMON CROQUETTES. 

Half can salmon, half cup of cracker crumbs, 
one-fourth cup of milk, one egg, one large teaspoon- 
ful of butter; chop the salmon fine, delicately sea- 
son; add the above ingredients, mix thoroughly, form 
into croquettes, roll in flour and dry in boiling lard. 

Nora Michael. 

SALMON CROQUETTES. 

One cup of salmon, two hard boiled eggs, one cup 
of thick white sauce. Remove skin and bones from 
fish, mince with pork, add the chopped eggs and 
white sauce, season with salt and pepper with a dash 
of cayenne, a tablespoonful of fine cut parsley; when 
cold shape into oblong croquettes, roll in fine dried 
bread crumbs, then in the beaten egg, then in crumbs . 
and swim in hot lard until a golden brown. Or shape 
the mixture like a lamb cutlet, brush with beaten 
egg and pat with bread crumbs, then fry a golden 
brown on each side, using just a little butter and 
lard. Serve either, with quarters of lemon. 

Mrs. Ella Bollinger. 

SALMON CROQUETTES. 

One can of salmon, one egg, salt and pepper to 
taste, one-half teacupful of milk, four boiled pota- 
toes, one-half cupful of bread crumbs. Mix thor- 
oughly, mould into croquettes; dip into egg and 
cracker dust; fry in hot lard. Mrs. M. J. Roth. 

SALMON CHOPS. 

Shred a pint can of salmon very fine, add the juice 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 23 



of one-half lemon, one level teaspoonful salt, a dash 
of red pepper, a little parsley and about two table- 
spoonfuls dried bread crumbs. Make a thick cream 
sauce of one cup of cream, a piece of butter size of 
a walnut, and one rounded tablespoonful flour. 
When cooked, add this to the salmon, and when the 
mixture is cold, mould into forms the shape of chops. 
Dip into bread crumbs, then into egg, then into the 
bread crumbs again. Swim in hot lard. 

Mrs. A. R. Mundorff. 

SALMON LOAF. 

One can of salmon, two cups of bread crumbs, 
two eggs, one-half onion chopped fine, one tea- 
spoonful salt, one-half teaspoonful of pepper. 
Break up the salmon into small pieces, mix it with 
the bread crumbs, add the salt, pepper, and onion. 
Beat the egg up light and mix well. Roll in bread 
or cracker crumbs. Bake one-half hour in a mod- 
erate oven. 

Mrs. William Maxwell, R. D. 5. 

DEVILED SALMON. 

Take either canned or fresh boiled salmon and pick 
it apart. Put one tablespoonful butter and one table- 
spoonful flour in a saucepan and mix. Add one-half 
pint milk, stir until boiling, take from fire and add 
salmon freed from skin and bones, one teaspoonful 
salt, a dash of red pepper, one teaspoonful onion 
juice, one-half teaspoonful white pepper. Fill this 
into shells or cups, put one tablespoonful butter 
into a frying-pan, sprinkle into it when hot one cup 
bread crumbs and brown, cover crumbs over top of 
salmon and bake ten or fifteen minutes. Halibut 
may be used same way. Mrs. C. S. S. 

SALMON PUDDING. 

One can salmon, one cup bread crumbs, four 
tablespoonfuls melted butter, minced parsley, salt 
and pepper, yolks of two eggs, whites of three eggs. 



24 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



Drain oil from fish and save for sauce. Chop the 
salmon very fine, beat eggs and mix all the ingred- 
ients. Put in a buttered dish and steam one and 
one-fourth hours. 

SAUCE. — One cup milk, oil of salmon, yolk of 
egg, one lemon, one teaspoonful of cornstarch, one 
tablespoonful melted butter, pepper and salt to 
taste. Put milk, oil of fish and butter in a sauce 
pan, moisten cornstarch with a little milk and stir 
it into the boiling mixture. When it commences 
to thicken add the yolk of egg well beaten. Remove 
from fire and add juice pi half a lemon. Pour around 
the salmon and garnish with the remaining half 
lemon. Mrs. Dr. Stick. 

DEVILED CLAMS. 

Put a dozen clams in a saucepan and bring to a 
boil, then remove from the fire and let cool. When 
cool put through a meat grinder, then add the liquor, 
one teaspoonful chopped parsley, two hard boiled, 
eggs, one cup cracker crumbs, a pinch of cayenne, 
and salt to taste. Fill clam shells, sprinkle with 
bread crumbs and dots of butter. Bake in oven until 
a golden brown. Blanche Hostetter. 

STEWED CLAMS. 

Always open them at home by placing a dull 
knife over the mouth and knocking with a hammer 
on a clean firm board. You save the liquor and 
they are free from dirt and filth. Wash your clams 
with a brush and open as above, strain the liquor 
and remove the dark substance from clams, run 
them through your meat grinder or chop on a board, 
put a piece of butter size of an egg in stew-pan or 
skillet, when hot put in clams, stew for ten minutes, 
add liquor and water, pepper to taste and stew ten 
minutes more, add a little cream or milk just before 
taking from fire. Have some thickening of flour 
and make it the consistency of cream. Have some 
bread toasted, buttered and cut into cubes, in a 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



25 



deep dish, pour the clams over these. This makes 
a most healthful and appetizing home dish for tea. 

Mrs. H. D. Shepperd. 

SOFT SHELL CRABS. 

Lift the shell and remove the spongy substance 
on both sides, then pull off the apron by putting 
thumb under the point in the middle of the under 
shell. Wipe dry and while alive put in a pan and 
fry brown in hot butter. Season with pepper and 
salt. Serve with tartare sauce, and garnish with 
lemon and parsley. 

SOFT SHELL CRABS. 

Wash the crabs, remove the lungs from both 
sides and dip in milk, then roll in flour and fry in 
plenty of very hot frying fat, when of a fine color, 
drain and dress on a folded napkin, and on top 
arrange a bunch of fresh parsley. 

A. F. Barker. 

DEVILED CRABS. 

One pound crab meat, one cup milk, one heaping 
tablespoonful flour, three hard boiled eggs, butter 
size of walnut, a little chopped parsley, season with 
salt and paprika. Heat milk, add flour and boil, 
chop whites fine and add to crab meat. Rub yolks 
through sieve and add to mixture. Fill shells, 
sprinkle with bread crumbs and brown in oven. 

Mrs. Clara G. Moul, York. 

DEVILED CRABS. 

Two pounds of crab meat, one-half loaf of stale 
bread crumbed very fine, one teaspoonful salt, 
one teaspoonful pepper, three-fourths cup butter, 
melted, whites of three eggs; mix meat, crumbs and 
butter, last add the whites of eggs beaten stiff; 
have ready about fifteen crab shells, well cleaned, 
and fill with the above; bake in a quick oven about 
thirty minutes, until a rich brown. 

Mrs. Clara Keller. 



26 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



DEVILED CRABS. 

One pound crab meat, three eggs well beaten, 
two large cups bread crumbs, one tablespoonful 
melted butter, one tablespoonful chopped parsley, 
season with salt and pepper. Shape in small flat 
cakes and fry in hot lard to cover. These are es- 
pecially fine served hot. Mrs. George T. Kerr. 

DEVILED CRABS. 

One quart of crab meat, two cups of bread crumbs, 
salt and pepper, five tablespoonfuls of melted butter, 
whites of two eggs beaten light, little parsley; mix 
all together, bake in moderate oven in crab shells 
or in cakes. Mrs. C. S. Newman. 

CRAB CAKES. 

One pound of crab flake, a little parsley ; salt and 
pepper to taste. Cook one-half cup of cream and 
one tablespoonful of flour to a thick sauce, and 
let cool. Mix crab meat with sauce, form into 
cakes, roll in egg, then in cracker dust, and fry quick- 
ly in hot lard. Mrs. George N. Gitt. 

HARD SHELL CRABS. 

Should be boiled from ten to fifteen minutes in 
salt water, according to size. If you wish to bake 
or devil them take the meat out and chop, mix with 
fine cracker dust and a little parsley, butter, pepper 
and salt to taste; put back into shell with a small 
piece of butter on the top and bake brown. Serve 
hot with lemon. A. F. Baker. 

TO DRESS AND BOIL A LOBSTER. 

Plunge the lobster into a kettle of warm water, 
add salt and stand it over the fire. Boil from one- 
half to three-fourth of an hour. Cooking too long 
makes the meat tough. When done, break in two 
and take away the claws, remove the green substance 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



27 



the coral and lady which are found under the head. 
Pick out the meat from the tail shell in one piece, 
being careful to remove the vein running entire 
length of tail. The lady, the vein and the spongy 
substance are the only parts not eatable. Serve cold 
with hard boiled eggs. Season to taste and garnish. 

SHRIMP WIGGLE. 

One large can of shrimp, one can of small peas, 
one-half pint cream, one tablespoonful flour, butter 
the size of a walnut, seasoning. Cut shrimp into 
small bits and air in a fiat dish for an hour. Drain 
peas and also air well. Make a sauce of cream, 
butter and flour, into this turn both the shrimp 
and the peas. Heat very slowly, stirring constantly 
as it may scorch before entirely hot through ana 
through. Season to taste. A very rich, as well as 
a very pretty dish, to serve. 

Elizabeth Bowman Titzel, 

Lancaster. 

FROGS. 

The hind legs of frogs are the only part used as 
food. They are usually sold skinned, but if you 
get them out of town they must be skinned and 
thrown into boiling water for five minutes. Take 
out and put them into cold water until cold, then 
wipe dry. Season with salt and pepper, dredge 
with flour and fry a nice brown in butter. Serve 
with parsley around them, or with cream sauce. 

OYSTERS. 

Oysters are not good unless they close firmly 
on the knife when being opened. They should never 
be plunged in hot water to increase their size. 

Oysters in the shell may be kept, at least, a month 
by covering them with a thick blanket well saturated 
with water, or it is better to keep a block of ice on 
oysters. Sprinkle with salt every few days. 



28 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



OYSTERS ON HALF SHELL. 

Select deep shell oysters, open and detach the 
upper shell. Have deep plates rilled with chopped 
ice, with a fringed napkin over the ice; lay the shells 
with the oyster in the napkin and serve with lemon 
cut in quarters, tobasco sauce or horseradish. Never 
put ice on the oysters as it spoils the flavor. 

A. F. Barker. 

OYSTER COCKTAIL. 

For every one hundred small oysters take four 
tablespoonfuls of tomato catsup, one tablespoonful, 
pepper, one tablespoonful of vinegar and one table- 
spoonful of Worcestershite sauce, the juice of two 
lemons, two or three drops of tabasco sauce and 
one cup of oyster liquid. Drain the oysters free 
from their liquor, and strain. Mix the cocktail 
fully one-half hour before serving. 

Edith Gitt Billmyer. 

CREAMED OYSTERS. 

Scald oysters in their own liquor and strain. To 
one pint of oyster liquor add one cup cream. Take 
one tablespoonful butter and one tablespoonful 
flour, put on stove and let heat gradually until 
melted, then add cream and oyster liquor, stir until 
thick. After it cools, add yolk of one egg. Lastly 
add oysters, season to taste, serve on toast, or in 
pattie shells. Mrs. R. C. Strouse. 

CREAMED OYSTERS. 

Melt a tablespoonful of butter in a sauce-pan, 
stir in two tablespoonfuls of flour, cook a moment, 
and pour in gradually one cupful of hot milk, salt 
and pepper to taste. Wash carefully one quart of 
oysters, and parboil in their own liquor until plump. 
Then pour the cream over the oysters. 

A. F. Barker. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 29 



BROILED OYSTERS WITH BROWN SAUCE. 

Use nice fat oysters, drain them in a colander, 
take one pint of liquor to every twenty five oysters 
put the liquor on to boil, skim all scum from the 
surface. Put one tablespoonful of butter in a frying- 
pan and stir until a nice brown, then add two table- 
spoonfuls of flour, mix well, and brown ; then add 
the oyster liquor, and stir constantly until it boils. 
Season with salt and pepper, pour into a granite 
sauce-pan and stand it over hot water until wanted. 
Lay the oysters on a towel after having wiped with 
soft cloth, sprinkle with salt. Have your griddle hot, 
test it with a drop of water; if it hisses, it is ready. 
Now cover the griddle with oysters, as soon as brown- 
ed on one side turn and brown on the other, then 
put them into the brown sauce, and serve on squares 
of buttered toast. Emma S. Shirk. 

ESCALLOPED OYSTERS. 

Scald the oysters in their own liquor, take them 
out with a fork and lay them in a deep dish, sprink- 
ling pepper, salt, cracker crumbs, and small pieces 
of butter over the top. Rub a little butter and 
flour together and stir into the liquor, then fill up 
the dish with it, and brown in the oven. 

Mrs. Harry Shultz. 

ESCALLOPED OYSTERS. 

Boil macaroni until soft, put a layer in a baking 
dish, cover with oysters, little pepper, salt and butter, 
then another layer of macaroni, then a layer of 
oysters, until dish is filled. Bake in oven. 

Mrs. W. B. Allewelt. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

Drain the oysters and save the liquor; into the 
liquor beat one or two eggs. Add a little salt, pepper, 
and a pinch of baking powder to some cracker dust. 
Dip oysters in the liquor, then in the cracker dust. 



30 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



and swim them in hot fat. If the oysters are small, 
place two, heart to heart, so that the thick parts 
point in opposite directions. Now dip in egg and 
cracker as before. Mrs. Harry Stair. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

Take large oysters, lay between clothes to dry. 
Dip the oysters into cracker dust, beat up two eggs 
at a time, dip the oysters into this and then again 
into the cracker dust. Fry in hot lard. 

Mrs. Frank Cremer. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

Take a dozen oysters,, wipe dry, dip in egg and 
bread crumbs, fry in hot lard, serve with lemon and 
parsley. A. F. Barker. 

OYSTER PIE. 

Line a dish with pastry, same as for pie, pour into 
it raw oysters, add butter size of small egg, season 
to taste/ cover with crust, bake one-half hour. 

Mrs. Frank Cremer. 

OYSTER PIE. 

Four large potatoes, cut in slices and cook until 
about done. Line a deep dish with baking powder 
pie crust, then first take a layer of potatoes, season 
with pepper, salt and butter, then a layer of oysters, 
and so on until the dish is filled. Then sprinkle 
in a little flour and cover with good rich milk, that 
has been boiled, last cover with an upper crust. 
Bake in hot oven for one-half hour. 

Mrs. C. S. Newman. 

PIGS IN A BLANKET. 

Drain large oysters, dip in beaten egg, roll in 
cracker crumbs, then lay on piece of thinly sliced 
bacon, roll, and fasten with tooth picks, and broil 
quickly. Mrs. H. M. Alleman. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 31 



OYSTER FRITTERS. 

Three eggs beaten separately, to the yolks add 
salt and pepper, then one pint sweet milk, stir in 
flour enough to make batter as for flannel cakes; 
then add a quart of well drained oysters and last 
the whipped whites of eggs; fry in just fat enough 
to brown nicely without scorching. 

Mrs. Paul Sell. 



OYSTER FRITTERS. 

Take as many oysters as desired number of fritters. 
Beat one egg, one cup of milk, one-half teaspoonful 
of salt, two cups of flour, two scant teaspoonfuls 
of baking powder, into a batter. Put lard into a 
frying-pan, and when smoking hot, place oysters 
one by one in the batter. Lift out with spoon and 
drop into the hot lard. Fry brown on one side then 
on the other. Serve hot. 

Mrs. Oliver Hesson. 



MACARONI AND OYSTERS. 

Use four ounces elbow macaroni, put in boiling 
water, boil rapidly for twenty minutes, drain twenty 
five oysters, put a layer of macaroni in bottom 
of baking dish, then a layer of oysters, a dust of 
salt and pepper, and so continue until the materials 
are used, cover the top with bread crumbs, put a 
few bits of butter over the top and brown in oven 
twenty minutes. Add strained oyster liquor to 
moisten, and a small cup of milk. 

Mrs. G. H. G. 
OYSTER PATTIES. 

Take pattie shells, cut the oysters in half, stew 
and thicken with flour and butter. Season to suit 
taste, then put into shells and serve. A. F. Barker. 



32 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



OYSTER PATTIES. 

One quart of oysters, one chopped egg, one-half 
cupful of flour, one-quarter cupful butter, pepper 
and salt to taste. Drain the oysters, boil the broth, 
add the flour, butter, egg, pepper and salt, the 
oysters last. To make the patties use one-quarter 
pound of butter and lard mixed, one teaspoonful 
of salt, use water or milk; mix together and roll 
thin, the same as making biscuits. Form a ridge 
about crust. Bake and serve with oysters. 

Mrs. Marsby Roth. 

CHICKEN AND OYSTER PATTIES. 

Put two tablespoonfuls of butter and three of 
flour in a sauce-pan, add one-half teaspoonful salt 
and one-fourth teaspoonful white pepper; put over 
the fire and when melted and mixed add one pint 
cream or rich milk. Stir until it thickens, then add 
one pint dice chicken and simmer five minutes. 
Add one pint oysters drained and cook until the 
edges have curled ; fill heated patty shells and serve. 

Mrs. Edgar Slagle. 

PICKLED OYSTERS. 

Strain the liquor off a gallon of oysters. Wash 
oysters in cold water and drain dry. Put on fire 
and stew gently till edges curl up. Put liquor that 
has been strained on the fire and into that put one 
heaping tablespoonful allspice, one heaping table- 
spoonful whole black pepper, three pieces of mace, 
five small pods of red pepper, salt to taste. Let 
this boil until liquor is nicely flavored, then add 
one pint of good vinegar. Take from the fire and 
add two lemons in slices. Pour hot liquor over the 
hot oysters and put away till next day in a cold 
place. Virginia Fitz. 

PICKLED OYSTERS. 

Put juice on to boil, skim, dip skimmer of oysters 
down into the hot juice two or three times, then 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 33 



dip into ice water. Place in a tureen. Mix one 
pint of vinegar with three pints boiled juice that 
has been cooled. To this add one lemon cut into 
thin slices, two dozen cloves, two dozen whole 
peppers, a few sprigs of mace, and salt if necessary. 
This mixture will season one hundred oysters. 

Mrs. Geo. D. Hopkins. 

DRESSING FOR ONE FISH. 

Into four tablespoonfuls melted butter rub two 
large tablespoonfuls flour to smooth paste. Add 
one cup fresh stewed tomatoes, or half can tomatoes, 
one tablespoonful Worcestershire sauce, or two 
tablespoonfuls of catsup. Serve hot. 

Mrs. George T. Kerr. 

DRAWN BUTTER SAUCE. 

One tablespoonful of flour, one tablespoonful 
of butter, one pint of hot milk, put butter in a pan 
until it melts, then add the flour; stir to prevent 
burning, then add milk and boil together for a few 
minutes. Mrs. T. J. Little. 

MINT SAUCE. 

One-half cup vinegar, one tablespoonful sugar, 
one-fourth cup chopped mint. Rinse the mint in 
cold water and chop fine. Heat the vinegar and 
add sugar, then mint. Let stand a while before 
using. 

WHITE SAUCE. 

One quart of milk, one small slice of onion, two 
sprigs of parsley, four tablespoonfuls butter, four 
tablespoonfuls flour, salt and pepper. Put milk, 
onion and parsley on in double boiler, melt butter 
and blend flour until smooth, add four tablespoonfuls 
of hot milk to butter and flour, and when well mixed 
stir into the boiling milk. Cook eight minutes, 
strain and serve. 



34 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



FISH SAUCE. 

One-half cup butter, one pint water, one table- 
spoonful lemon juice, three tablespoonfuls flour, 
yolks two eggs, salt and pepper. Beat butter and 
flour together add salt and pepper; add this to hot 
water and boil ten minutes. Beat yolks, put in top 
of double boiler, pour sauce on them and let them 
stand in boiling water for two minutes. 

BROWN SAUCE. 

One tablespoonful of butter, half pint of stock 
one tablespoonful of flour, half teaspoonful of onion 
juice, half teaspoonful of salt, eighth teaspoonful 
of white or black pepper. Melt the butter, stir 
until a dark brown, add the flour, mix well; add the 
stock, and stir continually until it boils; add the 
onion juice, salt and pepper, and it is ready to use. 

EGG SAUCE. 

Chop two hard boiled eggs quite fine, the yolks 
and white separately, and stir it into drawn butter 
before serving. This is used for boiled fish or vege- 
tables. 

CREAM SAUCE. 

One teaspoonful of flour, one-half pint of cream 
or milk, one tablespoonful of butter, one-half tea- 
spoonful salt, two dashes of pepper. Melt the 
butter, being careful not to brown it; add the flour, 
mix until smooth, then add the cream or milk, stir 
continually until it boils; add salt and pepper 
and use at once. If you are not quite ready to use 
it, stand it over boiling water to keep warm, stiring 
frequently to prevent a crust from forming on top. 

MINT SAUCE. 

Four tablespoonfuls of chopped mint, one-fourth 
pint of vinegar and two tablespoonfuls of white 
sugar. Let stand two hours before using. 

Miss Anna Garber. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 35 



CRANBERRY SAUCE. 

One quart of cranberries, one cup of water, boil 
fifteen minutes, squeeze through a colander, add 
one pound of white sugar', boil twenty minutes 
empty into a mould. 

Miss Anna Garber. 

TOMATO SAUCE. 

One pint of stewed tomatoes, butter size of walnut, 
one tablespoonful of flour, a sprig of parsley; a few 
onions, one bay leaf; salt and pepper to taste. 

CRANBERRY JELLY. 

Carefully pick over and wash one quart of cran- 
berries. Put them into a kettle with sufficient water 
to cover. When very soft strain the berries through 
a sieve. Measure the juice. To it add a little more 
than half as much sugar,, and boil as for jelly. Pour 
into moulds. 

Mrs. Wm. Boadenhamer. 

CRANBERRY JELLY. 

One quart cranberries, one cup water. Boil five 
or six minutes. Mash through a colander, add two 
cups sugar and set away to jell. Do not boil cran- 
berries after straining. 

Mrs. A. Kate Shriver. 



36 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



MEATS 
Roasting or Baking 



TIME 

Beef, ribs or sirloin,rare per pound 10 minutes 

" " " " well done " 12 " 

" " " " boned and rolled " 12 " 

Round of beef " 15 " 

Mutton, leg, rare 10 " 

Mutton, leg, well done 15 

Mutton, loin, rare 10 

Mutton, shoulder, stuffed " 15 

Mutton, saddle, rare 10 

Lamb, well done 15 

Veal, well done " 20 " 

Pork, well done " 30 " 

Turkey " 15 " 

Fowls, " 20 " 

Chicken, " 15 " 

Goose, " 18 " 

Venison, _■ 15 

Fillet, hot oven " 30 " 

Ducks, tame entire time 45 to 60 " 

Ducks, wild, very hot oven .... 15 to 30 

Partridge " 30 to 40 " 

Grouse 30 

Pigeons " 30 " 

Braised Meats " 3 to 4 hours 

Liver, whole " 2 



Boiling 



Mutton per pound 15 minutes 

Potted Beef " 30 to 35 " 

Corned Beef " 30 " 

Ham " 18 to 20 " 

Turkey " 15 

Chicken " 15 " 

Fowl " 20 to 30 44 

Tripe " ....3 to 5 hours 



HANOVER COOK BOOK 37 



Broiling 

Steak, 1 inch thick 8 to 10 minutes 

Steak, iy 2 inches thick 10 to 15 

Mutton Chops, French 8 

Mutton Chops, English 10 

Spring Chicken..... 20 

Quail , 8 to 10 

Grouse : 15 

Squabs 10 to 15 

Shad, Blueflsh, Trout 15 to 25 

Small Fish 5 to 10 



38 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



Meats 



TO CLEAN AND TRUSS POULTRY. 

Select plump fowl. Pick, singe and remove all 
yellow skin by dipping fowl in very hot water. 
Scrape with dull knife so as not to break skin. Re- 
move neck by drawing skin down as far as possible 
and cutting off neck close to body. Cut off feet. 
Remove oil-sac. Make slit below end of breast 
bon&, sufficiently large to remove intestines after 
having loosened them carefully from the back bone. 
Crop should also be carefully loosened and pushed 
down so that it may be removed with the intestines. 
Grasp gizzard fimly and draw all out. Cut round 
the vent so that the intestines may remain un- 
broken. Remove lungs, heart, liver and gizzard 
and see that inside of fowl is clean. Wipe with wet 
cloth. Turn wings across back until pinions meet. 
Tie legs close to body. C. G. M. 

TO ROAST A FOWL. 

Place fowl in roasting pan breast down take 1 cup 
water lump of butter and clean beef drippings 
and put into pan. Have oven hot and keep hot. 
Baste frequently and if necessary add more water. 
Roast fowl until tender and rich brown. Do not 
pierce with a fork until almost done as the pricking 
allows juices to escape and meat will be more dry. 
Turn and brown breast last. Almost 5 hours will 
re bequired to roast a good sized fowl. When done 
remove from pan and pour off drippings, add giblets, 
which have been chopped fine and previously boiled 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 39 



until tender. Stir thoroughly so as to remove glaze 
from bottom of pan with back of spoon, let boil up, 
thicken with flour, season to taste with pepper and 
salt, and send to table in gravy tureen. 

C. G. M. 

STUFFING FOR FOWL. 

Put 3 tablespoonfuls of butter in a pan on the 
stove, add minced onion and let simmer for few 
moments, but do not let it brown. Now put in bread 
crumbs and chopped parsley, with salt and pepper 
to taste. Remove from fire after stirring well and 
add enough rich milk to moisten thoroughly to- 
gether with 2 or 3 well beaten eggs. Mix well and 
it is ready for use. Raw oysters may be added if 
desired. Season inside of fowl with pepper and salt. 
Fill neck with stuffing and tie with strong thread. 
Fill body and sew up the opening. 

C. G. M. 

PRESSED CHICKEN. 

Boil 1 or 2 chickens in a small quantity of water 
with a little salt, and when thoroughly done take 
all meat from the bones, removing the skin, and 
keeping the light meat separate from the dark; 
chop the meat and season to taste with pepper and 
salt. Into a meat presser or any other mold such 
as a crock or pan put a layer of light and a layer of 
dark meat till all is used; add the liquor it was 
boiled in, which should be about 1 teacupful. and 
put on a heavy weight; when cold cut in slices. 

Many chop all the meat together,, add 1 pounded 
cracker to the liquor the chicken was boiled in, and 
mix all thoroughly before putting into the mold. 
Either way is nice. Boned turkey can be prepared 
in the same way, slicing instead of chopping. 

JELLIED CHICKEN. 

Cook chicken until well done. Remove skin and 
bones. Season with salt, pepper and place in mold. 



40 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



To the water left add one-quarter box of gelatine 
and juice of 1 lemon. Boil down to two-thirds of 
pint, pour oyer chicken in mold, and when cold, 
slice. If desired, line the bottom and sides of the 
mold with hard boiled eggs sliced. 

Mrs. C. S. Newman. 

JELLIED CHICKEN. 

Boil chicken until very tender, remove the meat 
from the bones, boil the broth until there is about 
one-half cup, season well with salt and pepper. Put 
three slices of hard boiled egg in the bottom of a 
6 in. pudding pan forming a design; pack in the 
chicken, and pour the broth over the chicken. Set 
on ice to cool. Remove from pan whole, and gar- 
nish with parsley. Mrs. R. L. Ehrhart. 

CHICKEN POT PIE. 

Line a baking pan with dough. Place in it alter- ' 
nate layers of chicken that has been par boiled, and 
thinly sliced raw white potatoes. Sprinkle ' each 
layer with a little salt. On last layer put 2 thin slices 
of breakfast bacon, and moisten the pie with a very 
little of the broth in which the fowl was boiled. 
Reserve the remaining broth for gravy. Cover pie 
with a crust slit in the center, and bake in a moderate 
oven. Miss Anna Garber. 

CHICKEN POT PIE. 

One large year old chicken^ 1 lb. of lean ham, 4 
medium sized potatoes, salt arid pepper. Make the 
paste first and stand it in a cool place while you 
prepare the chicken. Cut the chicken as for a 
fricassee, pare and cut the potatoes into dice, cut 
ham the same size. Now roll out half the paste 
into a thin sheet. Butter the sides and bottom of 
a rounding pot. Line the sides* with paste and use 
the trimmings to cut into squares. Put a layer of 
chicken into bottom of pot, then a layer of potatoes, 
then a sprinkling of ham, salt and pepper, and the 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 41 



squares of paste, then a layer of chicken, potatoes, 
ham, etc. Roll out the remainder of the paste, 
make a hole in the middle of it, and lay on top of 
the last layer, which should be potatoes. Pour in 
through this hole about 1 quart of boiling water, 
place over a slow fire and simmer continually for 
one and one-half hours. Half an hour before the pie 
is done add 1 tablespoonful of butter (cut into bits) 
through the hole in top crust. • Rabbit or squirrel 
pot pie may be made in the same manner, using 2 
rabbits or 3 squirrels. 

CHICKEN CORN PIE. 

Joint a spring chicken and let it stew for 15 min- 
utes. Make a good puff paste and line the sides of a 
deep baking dish with it; then put in the bottom a 
layer of chicken and cover well with green corn cut 
from the cob ; season with pepper, salt and plenty of 
butter. Fill the dish in this manner and add the 
water in which the chicken was boiled; cover the 
top with the pastry and bake in a good oven till the 
crust is well browned, not forgetting to leave an 
opening in the centre for the steam to escape. 

CHICKEN PIE. 

Stew chicken until tender^ season with one-fourth 
pound butter, salt and pepper. Line the sides of pie 
dish with pastry crust. Pour in the stewed chicken 
and cover loosely with a crust, first cutting in the 
centre a hole the size of a small teacup. Have ready 
1 pint oysters, heat the liquor, thicken with a little 
flour and water, and season with salt, pepper and 
butter the size of an egg. When it comes to a boil 
pour over the oysters, and about 20 minutes before 
the pie is done, lift the top crust and put them in. 

Miss Emily J. Young. 

TO ROAST A DUCK. 

Pick, singe and draw a duck. Wash thoroughly 
inside and outside. Lay in water with a little salt, 
about half an hour. 



42 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



FILLING. — Break into small pieces one medium 
sized baker's loaf of stale bread. Season to taste 
with salt, pepper and a little parsley. Pour over 
the bread 4 eggs beaten light, with milk sufficient 
to moisten the bread without making it soggy. A 
little celery improves the filling. Into a pan put 1 
large tablespoonful each of lard and butter, with 1 
medium sized onion, cut fine. When the onion is 
cooked soft, not brown, toss in the bread, and stir 
until thoroughly heated through. Put this filling 
loosely into the duck. If the bird is not very fat, 
spread it generously with lard; dust with salt and 
pepper, and place it, breast down, in a roaster, with 
about 1 pint of water. Baste occasionally. A me- 
dium size duck will take from 2 to 3 hours. 

Mrs. Wm .Boadenhamer. 

TURKEY SCALLOP. 

Chop fine fragments of turkey and place a layer 
of bread crumbs in the bottom of buttered pudding 
dish, then a layer of turkey, adding any cold dressing 
that may be left. Have ready 3 or 4 hard boiled 
eggs, slice and add a few slices to each layer of turkey. 
Alternate the layers of meat and crumbs, adding 
bits of butter and seasoning to each and arrange 
that the last layer be of crumbs. Dot bits of butter 
over the top. Thin with hot water or milk what 
gravy may be left and pour over it. Milk alone, 
or even water with a tablespoonful of melted butter 
may be used. Cover the dish and bake one-half 
hour. A few minutes before serving remove the 
cover and let the scallop brown. Roast chicken may 
be served in the same way. 

ROAST GOOSE. ' 

Prepare goose, fill with bread filling made with 
bread crumbs, 2 eggs well beaten, parsley, enough 
onion to flavor; season to taste. When ready for 
oven cut thin slices of bacon, put on top of fowl. 
Keep goose from getting in the grease which collects 
in pan. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 43 



YANKEE DROPPED DUMPLINGS. 

One and one-half cups of floury one teaspoonful of 
baking powder, one-half teaspoonful of salt. Sift all 
together, add 1 egg, enough sweet milk to make a 
smooth batter, tolerably thick, drop into stewed 
chicken, let boil 15 or 20 minutes. 

Miss Anna Garber. 

TURKEY FILLING. 

1J loaves of bakers old bread cut fine, 1 onion 
cut fine, 1 cup of butter and lard. Cook onion till 
soft in the butter and lard. Throw in the bread and 
fry brown. Season with salt, pepper and parsley. 
Beat 4 eggs light, add 1 cup of milk and pour over 
the bread. Mrs. Henry Jones. 

QUAIL ON TOAST. 

Remove skin with feathers from the quail or 
partridge. Some prefer to remove the feathers 
without scalding. Draw and wipe clean. Soak in 
salt water a short time. Split down the back. Dry 
with a clean cloth. Parboil in salt-water until 
tender, (this broth can be used for gravy). Place 
in bread- toaster, butter well, and toast quickly on 
both sides over a clean, quick fire, adding frequently 
a little butter to keep from drying out. Then serve 
on toasted bread, one bird to each piece of bread. 

Mrs. M. C. W. 

FRIED RABBIT. 

Skin, draw, remove head and feet, and wash well 
the rabbit. Soak in strong salt-water 1 hour or 
longer according to the age of the rabbit. Then 
wash well again. Parboil in salt-water until tender. 
Use the broth for gravy. Put \ to § cup butter in 
a frying-pan, let it get brown by quick heat, place 
the rabbit in this browned butter and fry quickly 
on both sides, until well browned. 

Mrs. M. C. W. 



44 



HAXOVER COOK BOOK. 



SQUIRREL POT PIE. 

Skin > draw, remove the head and feet, and wash 
well the squirrel. Soak in strong salt-water to draw 
out the blood and wild taste. Wash well, and parboil 
in salt-water until tender. Pare, cut into small dice, 
six potatoes, boil them in weak salt-water until soft. 

PASTRY. — Take 1| pints flour, pinch of salt, 
1J teaspoonful good baking powder; sift these ingre- 
dients together, and rub well into this, one-third 
cup butter. Add 1 cup sweet milk to complete the 
pastry. 

Line a pudding dish with part of this pastry. 
Add 1 layer of potatoes, 1 layer of squirrel alternately 
until all is added. Add a pinch of salt, pepper, 
celery-salt, parsley, and butter the size of a walnut. 
Dust the top well "with flour, and cover with the 
remainder of the pastrv. Bake in a quick oven for 
a half hour. Mrs. M. C. W. 

MILES STERNER'S ROASTED RACCOON. 

Soak in salt water over night > par boil, fill same 
as turkey, and lay in the pan. An onion or other 
flavoring if desired. Make brown gravy and serve. 

Opossum is par boiled, stuffed, and roasted in 
the same manner, only using wooden skewes to 
rest the opossum upon during the roasting, in order 
that the surplus fat may drain off. 

CHICKEX FILLING FOR PATTIES. 

1 pt. of cream, 1 tablespoonful of flour, 1 pt. 
cooked chicken cut in small bits, 4 tablespoonfuls 
of chopped mushrooms, salt and pepper. Put \ 
of the cream on to boil, mix the other half with the 
flour and stir into the boiling cream; when this has 
boiled up add chicken, mushrooms and seasoning. 

Mrs. Aaron Hostetter. 

CHICKEX CROQUETTES. 

2 lbs. cold chicken (boned), 1 cup cold mashed 
potatoes made soft with milk, 2 eggs, \ cup gravy 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 45 



or drawn butter, salt and pepper to taste, cracker 
crumbs. Chop chicken very fine mix with gravy 
or drawn butter, and season. Beat in the eggs then 
the potatoes', and stir until very hot in a buttered 
sauce-pan Let the mixture cool quickly, make into 
croquettes, roll in fine cracker crumbs, and fry in 
plenty of hot lard. 

Mrs. T. J. Little. 

CHICKEN OR VEAL CROQUETTES. 

Boil 3 lbs. chicken or veal until tender, take the 
liquor in which the meat was boiled , a piece of butter 
the size of an egg, add tablespoonful each flour, 
pepper and salt, parsley and onion cut fine. Add 
the minced chicken to the above with 1 well beaten 
egg, put away to cool, then mold, dip in egg and 
bread crumbs, fry in hot lard. 

Mrs. Paul Hoke. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

Put 1 cup milk in a sauce pan over fire, when it 
boils add butter size of a walnut and 1 rounding 
tablespoonful flour. Let boil up thick. When 
cool add 1 teaspoonful salt, \ teaspoonful pepper, 
a bit of minced onion, parsley, 1 cup fine soft bread 
crumbs and 1 full pint finely chopped cooked 
chicken. Beat 1 egg and work in with the other 
ingredients. Shape into croquettes. Dip in beaten 
egg and crumbs; fry in deep hot lard. 

Mrs. Lulu P. Stover. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

1 boiled chicken, 1 cup of bread crumbs, 2 oz. 
of melted butter, 2 oz. of flour, 1 cup of water in 
which the meat was boiled, J cup of cream, 2 eggs, 
pepper, salt, onion, and parsley. Boil the butter, 
flour, cream, and water together for 2 minutes. 
Mix into the minced meat/, cool, then mold, roll 
in egg, then in bread crumbs and fry. 

Mrs. J. A. Melsheimer. 



46 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



MARYLAND FRIED CHICKEN. 

A chicken should not remain in water as it de- 
stroys the flavor. Also if too long on ice. Whip 
light 1 or 2 eggs. Dip each piece of chicken in the 
egg, then roll in cracker crumbs. Have the butter 
and lard very hot in the pan, put in the chicken, 
cover and fry slowly. Lamb chops are delicious 
prepared in the same manner. The chicken can be 
rolled in crackers or flour, without using the egg. 

Mrs. George T. Kerr. 

FRIED CHICKEN. 

Cut young spring chicken into the desired num- 
ber of pieces. Roll in flour and thoroughly brown 
in a hot skillet into which has been placed J cup 
butter. Remove from fire and add 1 cup boiling 
water or stock. Season with salt and pepper. Put 
on the lid and place in oven to steam for 45 to 60 
minutes, or until tender. 

Mrs. C. Stahr Hamm, Kingsport, Tenn. 

A BROWN FRICASSEE OF CHICKEN. 

Cut the chicken. Place | lb. of salt pork or 2 oz. 
of butter in a sauce pan; when a nice brown put 
in the chicken. Stir until every piece is nicely brown- 
ed, then add 2 tablespoonfuls of flour; stir again, 
add 1 pt. of boiling water or stock, stir until it boils; 
add 1 teaspoonful of salt. Cover and let simmer 
gently until tender, then add a teaspoonful of onion 
juice and a little black pepper. Serve. 

PRESSED VEAL. 

A large knuckle of veal, a small piece of salt pork 
or ham, cover with water and boil until ready to 
come from bones, remove gristle and bones, chop 
fine, add a teaspoonful of onion juice, chopped 
parsle^, \ teaspoonful of summer savory, salt and 
pepper" to taste, add to the liquor which should be 
boiled down to a cupful, put all into a mold, pack 
closely, serve when firm, sliced very thin. 

Mrs. Ella Bollinger. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 47 



VEAL LOAF. 

3 lbs. lean veal chopped very fine, 3 eggs well 
beaten, add to meat with 1 tablespoonful pepper, 
salt, nutmeg and grated onion, and 2 tablespoonfuls 
cream, 4 tablespoonfuls bread crumbs, mix and knead 
with hands into loaf. Baste well with water and 
butter. Bake 1| hours. 

Mrs. Duncan. 

VEAL LOAF. 

2 lbs. of veal minced fine, 6 crackers rolled fine, 
2 tablespoonfuls butter, 2 tablespoonfuls cream, 
1 tablespoonful salt, J tablespoonful of pepper, 
and 3 well beaten eggs. Mix well and press into 
loaf, and bake li hrs. in moderate oven. 

Mrs. W. F. Kintzing. 

VEAL LOAF. 

3 lbs. veal, 16 crackers ro led fine, 3 eggs well 
beaten, butter size of an egg, 1 nutmeg, 1 tablespoon- 
ful of pepper, 1 tablespoonful of salt. Bake 2 hours. 

Mrs. Henry Zouck. 

VEAL LOAF. 

3 lbs. of raw veal, butter the size of an egg, 8 
crackers, 1 nutmeg, a tablespoonful of pepper, 1 of 
salt, 2 eggs. The veal is chopped fine, the whole 
mixed well, made into a loaf and baked 2 hours. 
Put water around the loaf while baking. 

A. Kate Shriver. 

SWEET BREADS STEWED. 

Wash and remove all the bits of skin, soak in 
salt and water 1 hour, then parboil. When half 
cooked take from fire, cut into small pieces, stew 
in a little water till tender, add a piece of butter, 
a teaspoonful of salt, a teaspoonful of flour, and boil 
up once. Serve on toast very hot. Another way 
is to prepare as above and serve with tomato sauce, 



48 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



IRISH STEW. 

Take 2 lbs. of stewing lamb, 6 potatoes, 4 onions , 
4 carrots, 4 turnips, \ cup of rice; boil until tender. 

A. B. C. 

CALF SWEET BREADS, FRIED. 

After soaking 1 hour, trim free from fat and skin, 
then put them into boiling water, add a teaspoonful 
of salt and boil 15 minutes., then throw them into 
cold water for five minutes. Put in a cold place 
until ready for use. They will keep 36 hours. Always 
boil in aliminum or granite sauce pan. Cut the 
boiled sweet bread into pieces about 2 inches square, 
dip into egg seasoned with pepper and salt, then 
roll in bread crumbs and fry in a little lard and but- 
ter mixed. 

MOCK TERRAPIN. 

Fry 2 lbs. sliced calf's liver till brown, then cut up 
into small pieces, dredge a little flour' over them, 
add 3 hard boiled eggs chopped fine, a little mus- 
tard, cayenne pepper, salt, and a cup of cream or 
milk. Let boil up once and serve. 

Miss Emily J. Young. 

BAKED LIVER. 

Soak calf's liver in cold water 1 hour, drain a few 
minutes and then dip in flour, seasoned with salt 
and pepper. Lay in skillet 8 or 10 pieces, add large 
pieces of lard and butter, and if liked a whole onion. 
Cover with boiling water and put in hot oven and 
bake 1 hour. Mrs. H. S. Ehrhart. 

ROAST SPARERIBS. 

Trim the rough ends neatly, crack the ribs across 
the middle, rub with salt and sprinkle with pepper. 
Fold, stuff with turkey dressing, sew up tightly, 
place in dripping-pan with a pint of water. Baste 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 49 



frequently, turning over once so as to bake both 
sides equally until a rich brown. 

Mrs. John A. Cremer. 

SOUTHERN STYLE BREAKFAST BACON. 

Bacon must be sliced thin and boiled for a minute 
or two in little water, drain, dip in flour and crisp 
in its own fat. Mrs. J. P. Barnitz. 

DELICIOUS BOILED HAM. 

Put the ham to soak over night in cold water. 
In the morning scrape and wipe off well. Put ham 
in kettle with sufficient water to cover. When the 
water begins to boil place where the heat will be 
just sufficient to keep up a gentle boiling. From 
4 to 5 hours will be required to boil a ham of 12 lbs. 
Remove the kettle from the stove and allow the 
ham to remain in kettle 2 hours or until cool. On 
removing draw off skin, sprinkle over entire surface 
a layer fo bread crumbs, 3 tablespoonfuls of brown 
sugar, dot attractively with cloves. Put into oven 
to brown. Mrs. S. L. Bixler. 

BAKED HAM IN OLD VIRGINIA STYLE. 

Choose a fine large well cured ham and rub it 
thoroughly with a rough towel ; wash, and let it soak 
in cold water over night. In the morning place the 
ham in a boiler or large turkey roaster and cover 
with boiling water, allow it to boil gently until the 
flesh separates from the end of the bone. Take from 
fire, allow ham to stand in the water it was boiled 
in until cold, remove the skin and wipe with fresh 
towel. Pour 1 cup of vinegar and 1 cup of sugar 
on top, and stick cloves over the surface. Place 
in hot oven until sugar is brown. Baste frequently. 

Mrs. H. D. S. 

BAKED HAM WITH POTATOES. 

Roll 1 slice of ham, cut 2 inches thick, in flour 
Have some butter in the baking dish and brown the 



50 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



ham in it, add the potatoes, either sweet or white, 
cover with milk and bake 1 hour. 

Mrs. Frank Bussom. 

BAKED HAM. 

Take a slice of ham about 2| inches thick or an 
end of ham, put on stove and boil very slowly for 
about an hour. Pour off water, put ham in roaster 
and pour in about 1 pint of milk. Cover top of 
ham with J cup of brown sugar, and sprinkle with 
cinnamon. Stick whole cloves in here and there, put 
in medium oven and bake. 

Mrs. J. W. Gitt. 

SUGAR CURE FOR HAMS. 

For 2 hogs take 3 quarts salt, | lb. sugar, \ lb. 
salt-petre, i lb. pepper. 

Mrs. C. Anthony. 



TO PRESERVE HAMS. 

To 100 lbs. of meat take 4 oz. of saltpetre, 1J lbs. 
brown sugar, 5 pints of salt, 3 tablespoonfuls but- 
chers pepper; mix all well together. Rub meat with 
a damp cloth ,then rub in the preparation very thor- 
oughly. Repeat the application twice. Lay hams 
on table or board for 2 weeks or longer, in the mean- 
time apply salt whenever needed. Hang up and 
smoke. 

SEASONING FOR SAUSAGE. 

To 10 lbs. of pork, 4 oz. salt, 1 oz. pepper, f oz. 
coriander. Henry Wirt. 

PICKLE FOR PORK. 

To 80 lbs. of meat take 3 ozs. of saltpetre, 1 lb. of 
sugar and 2 tincupfuls of salt. 

Mrs. Cathrine A. Brough. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 51 



PICKLE FOR BEEF. 

3 lbs. of salt to 1 gal. water. Boil and skim. 
Let coolj then add 4 lbs. of sugar to each 100 lbs. 
of meat. Soak meat 4 hrs. before putting into pickle. 
Drain and let meat dry. 

Mrs. Cathrine A. Brough. 

BROWNED HASH. 

Mix cold mashed potatoes with cold ground meat, 
put into a hot skillet, which has a little hot lard in 
it. Fry until brown, and serve with parsley leaf 
on top. 

CANNELON OF BEEF. 

1 lb. of round steak chopped fine, 1 egg, 1 table- 
spoonful chopped parsley, 1 tablespoonful butter, 
2 tablespoonfuls bread crumbs, 1 teaspoonful of 
lemon juice, 1 teaspoonful salt, a dash of pepper, 
J teaspoonful onion juice. Mix all the ingredients 
together, form into a roll, wrap in buttered paper; 
bake in a quick oven 30 minutes. Baste with \ cup 
butter melted in 1 cup of water. 

Mrs. Frank Bussom. 

STUFFED BEEFSTEAK. 

Take a rump steak about 1 inch thick, make a 
stuffing of bread, herbs, etc., and spread it over the 
steak. Roll it up and with a needle and coarse thread 
sew it together. Lay in pot on 1 or 2 wooden skewers, 
and put in water just sufficient to cover it. Let it 
stew slowly for 2 hours, longer if the beef is tough. 
Serve it in a dish with the gravy turned over it. To 
be carved crosswise in slices through beef and stuffing. 

CHILI CON-CARNIE. 

2 lbs. beef, boil until tender, cut in dice, 1 large 
can tomatoes, 2 large tablespoonfuls flour. 1 onion 
fried in butter, 2 teaspoonfuls chili powder, salt. 



52 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



"to taste,, add a little bit of beef broth to moisten; 
bake 1 hour. Serve hot. 

Mrs. Clinton J. Gitt. 



FRENCH BAKED BEEFSTEAK. 

Have a nice fat steak cut not less than an inch 
thick. Have \ lb. butter hot in a baking dish. Cut 
the steak in half, dredge well with salt, pepper, and 
3 tablespoonfuls flour, put other half steak on top 
and thoroughly cover with flour, adding another 
J lb. of butter, place in a moderatley hot oven, 
bake an hour. After the steak is taken up put \ 
pint coffee in pan, then pour over steak. 

Mrs. H. W. Hart. 



BAKED BEEFSTEAK. 

Put a porterhouse steak cut 2 inches thick in a 
pan with seme water and cover with sliced onions. 
Bake in oven uncovered 30 minutes. A can of 
Campbells tcmato soup may also be added. 

Mrs. L. H. Hoffacker. 



BEEF BROWNIES. 

For four in family, — 2 lbs. of round steak, 1 inch 
thick, pound out flat, then cut into strips 2 inches 
thick and about 6 inches long. Make a dressing of 
stale bread, 1 egg, 1 onion, a small piece of butter, 
sage, salt, and pepper to taste. Spread this dressing 
on the strips of meat, roll up and pin each of the 
brownies with tooth-picks. They will look like 
miniature roasts. Put some butter and lard into a 
kettle, and when hot put in the brownies and brown 
nicely, then add water enough to cover; simmer 
\\ hours. Enough dressing will boil out to make 
a nice brown gravy. Garnish the platter with let- 
tuce leaves and slices of tomatoes. 

Mrs. H. S. Ehrhart. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 5a 



MEAT BALLS. 

1 cup of cold chopped meat, \ cup of hot mashed 
potatoes, 1 egg, butter size of walnut, pepper and 
salt, pinch of dry mustard. Put butter in hot mashed 
potatoes, then add chopped meat, egg beaten, 
pepper, salt and mustard. Beat together until well 
mixed and light, make into balls and fry in very 
hot butter and lard. Mrs. Cora GrabilL 

MEAT CROQUETTES. 

Take cold veal, beef or chicken, cut fine; take 
| the quantity of bread crumbs,, 2 eggs^ butter the 
size of an egg, pepper and salt. Mix all together, 
add a little cream, form into cakes, dip into egg, 
roll in cracker crumbs and fry in hot lard. 

Mrs. John A. Cremer. 

MEAT LOAF WITH EGGS. 

Chop 1 lb. lean beef and \ lb. veal with \ lb. pork, 
very fine; mix well, add 1 egg, beaten light, 3 soda 
crackers,. rolled; 1 dessertspoonful salt; J teaspoonful 
pepper. Form into an oblong roll, packing firm, 
then make a grove through the centre; into this 
groove put 3 hardboiled eggs,, end to end; press 
firmly, roll the meat level in cracker crumbs, bake 
in shallow pan 2 hours in moderate oven, basting 
occasionally with water and malted butter. When 
the loaf is sliced, there should be a slice of egg in 
each picee. Garnish with parsley or lettuce. 

Mrs. A. R. Brodbeck. 

MOCK DUCK. 

Round or flank steak, chopped onion, bread 
crumbs, salt, pepper, and sage. Place on the round 
or flank steak a filling of bread crumos, seasoned 
with salt,, pepper, chopped onion, butter, (or bacon 
or ham fat), and sage. Roll the steak around the 
stuffing and fasten with skewers of tooth-picks. 
Place in a casserole. Add a cup of stoek o: wate r 



54 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



and bake in a quick oven about 45 minutes. Ac- 
company this with currant jelly. 

Mrs. C. Stahr Hamm, Kingsport^ Tenn. 

MIXED MEAT LOAF. 

3 lbs. veal shank; 1 lb. sausage; 3 cups dry bread 
crumbs; 1 cup sweet milk; salt, pepper, pinch' of 
sage. Boil shank and chip meat fine. Mix thor- 
oughly with the sausage* milk, bread crumbs and 
seasoning. Form into a loaf and bake until brown. 
Mrs. C. Stahr Hamm, Kingsport, Tenn. 

SCRAP CAKES. 

Take through the meat chopper any kind of cold 
meat that has been left over, add 1 egg, a little 
onion, parsley or sage^ pepper and salt, and enough 
cracker crumbs to handle. Mix well ; form into cakes, 
dip into egg, then into cracker crumbs, fry in butter 
and lard. Mrs. Jacob Trone. 

BEEF PATTIES. 

Chop cold beef fine; beat 2 eggs ; and mix with 
meat, add a little milk, melted butter, salt and 
pepper. Make into rolls and fry. 

Mrs. Samuel Althoff . 

DELICIOUS PORK AND BEEF LOAF. 

1 lb. of beef of the rounds; \ lb. of pork; grind 
both; season with pepper and salt to taste; knead 
all together and make into a long loaf; or if you 
prefer, make into small cakes; put into a roaster 
with sufficient water to boil and let it roast slowly. 

Mrs. Mary Ehrhart, New Oxford, Pa. 

BEEF ROLL. 

To 1 lb. of raw beef take 1 egg, 4 tablespoonfuls 
of cracker crumbs, 1 teaspoonful of salt^ little pepper. 
Roll, wash with egg; bake in slow oven 4 hours. 

Mrs. A. L. Benford. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 55 



POT ROAST. 

Select a nice piece of roasting meat. Place in 
cooking vessel, season with salt and pepper, sprinkle 
with flour, and a little sugar, with sufficient water 
to keep from burning, adding more as needed. After 
removing the meat, by adding a little water you wil 
have enough stock to make a nice dressing. 

Mrs. Jacob Sell. 

SPICED POT ROAST. 

Get a good sized piece of beef and spice with 
oniori, bay leaf, cloves, vinegar, salt and pepper. 
If vinegar is too strong, add a little water. Spice 
the meat 24 hours. Take the beef out of spice. 
Brown on both sides, then add the juice and let 
boil 2 hours, then thicken with brown flour to make 
a good gravy. Add a good piece of butter when 
finished. 

Mrs. Charles Heckendorn. 

BAKED TONGUE. 

Prepare 1 beef or 3 to 4 calve' s tongues by sim- 
mering in plenty of well salted water until they can 
be readily pierced by a fork. Remove the skin and 
membrane, place in a roasting pan or skillet with 
brown sauce prepared in this way: 

Brown 1 tablespoonful of butter and 2 of flour, 
add a quart of the essence from the tongue, if too 
salt use part water; one minced onion, bay leaf, 
pepper corn,, 1 tablespoonful of Worcestershire and 
2 of tomato catsup. Bake the tongues in this 1 hour. 
Use cold or hot; if the latter is preferred, seasoning 
may be added. A sliced potato, carrot or turnip, 
bit of tomato, are all good. If allowed to cool pour 
all of brown sauce over the tongues and use in 
serving. Mrs. Geo. E. Stover. 

BEEF LOAF. 

2 lbs. of beef chopped fine, 1 egg, a small onion, 
1 cup of bread crumbs or crackers rolled fine, \ cup 



56 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



of sweet milk or cream, salt and pepper to taste, 
1 tablespoonful chopped parsley, 2 tablespoonfuls 
melted butter. Mix all together, press into a firm 
loaf, put into a greased pan, rub butter over top 
and bake 1 hour. 

Mrs. Bortner. 

VEAL PIE. 

Wash a shank of veal weighing 3 or 4 lbs. and 
cover with boiling water, adding a few strips of 
fat beef or prok — beef preferred. Cook slowly 
until the veal is ready to fall from the bones. When 
cool remove the bones, cutting the meat so that no 
piece is larger than 2 inches. Return to the liquor, 
adding sufficient water to make a juicy stew. Season 
with salt and pepper; let come to a boil and thicken 
slightly with flour, as you would a stew. Line your 
pan with the dough | inch thick, or as thin as you 
can handle; pour in the meat, roll out the top crust, 
cut 4 holes in the top crust for the escape of steam, 
and bake in a rather hot oven 20 or 30 minutes. 
Serve in the dish in which it was baked. 

Mrs. A. B. Conrad. 

VEAL CAKE. 

A few slices of cold roast veal, a few slices of cold 
ham, 2 hard boiled eggs, 2 tablespoonfuls of minced 
parsley, a little pepper, good gravy or stock. Cut 
off all the brown outside from the veal and cut the 
eggs into slices. Procure a pretty mold; lay veal, 
ham, eggs and parsley in layers, with a little pepper 
between each, and when the mold is full, get some 
strong stock and fill up the shape. Bake for J hour, 
and when cold turn it out. Very convenient for 
picnics. Mrs. John A. Cremer. 

BREADED VEAL CUTLETS. 

Trim and flatten the cutlets, pepper and salt and 
roll in beaten egg, then in pounded crackers. Fry 
rather slowly in good drippings, drain and squeeze 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 57 



a little lemon juice on each and serve hot, or serve 
with tomato sauce. 

Mrs. John A. Cremer. 

VEAL CROQUETTES. 

Take 1 cup of cold roast breast of veal chopped 
fine, 1 cup of cold boiled rice, 1 egg, 2 tablespoonfuls 
of cream, 1 teaspoonful of minced parsley, a little 
onion juice, salt, pepper and nutmeg. Heat the 
milk, veal and rice together, add the egg and season- 
ing, turn out on a dish. When cold form into cro- 
quettes, roll first in beaten egg then in bread crumbs 
and fry in boiling fat. Any cold meat may be used 
instead of veal. 

Emma E. Bucher. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

PRESSED VEAL. 

Stew 2 lbs. of lean veal, save the broth; cut very 
fine and season well with salt, pepper, parsley, and 
onion juice. Add 1 tablespoonful of melted butter, 
1 cup bread crumbs, and 2 eggs well beaten. Mix 
the whole well together, tie this in a bag and boil 
in the above mentioned broth for 10 minutes. Put 
the bag under a heavy weight and keep cold. Then 
slice. 

Mrs. J. A. Melsheimer. 



58 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 

Eggs 



TO PRESERVE EGGS. 

1 lb. of water glass to 1 gal. of water. Stir several 
times each day for several days, then add eggs. 

TO PRESERVE EGGS. 

Grease each egg with lard and stand on point 
and cover with lime water. 

TIME FOR BOILING EGGS. 

Poached eggs — four minutes. Soft-boiled eggs — 
2\ to 3 minutes. Hard-boiled eggs — 6 to 8 minutes. 
To prepare soft-boiled eggs for invalid or weak 
stomach— make a pint of water boiling hot, put in 
the egg and remove from stove, let set for 10 minutes 
and serve. Mrs. C. E. Bortner. 

EGG FRITTERS. 

Beat yolks of 4 eggs, 1 cup of cold water, 2 table- 
spoonfuls melted butter, 2 cups of flour, now add 
the well beaten whites of the eggs, and drop by 
spoonfuls into smoking hot lard. Brown on one side 
and then on the other. While hot dust with powder- 
ed sugar and serve. 

OMELET. 

4 eggs, 1 tablespoonful flour or cornstarch, prefer- 
ably the latter, | cup milk, a pinch of salt. Separate 
whites and yolks of eggs. Mix yolks, slightly beaten, 
with milk and flour or cornstarch, add whites beaten 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 59 



to a stiff froth, and bake in a hot greased skillet for 
15 minutes. Fold and serve at once. 

Mrs. A. R. Mundorff. 

EGG OMELET. 

4 eggs, 1 pint milk, \ cup flour, salt to taste. 
Beat yolks of eggs thoroughly, mix flour and milk 
together until smooth, add to yolks and put on fire 
until it thickens, then pour over the beaten whites, 
pour into greased pans and bake about 30 minutes. 

Mrs. L. H. Hoffacker. 

OMELET. 

Six eggs, separate whites and yolks. Beat yolks 
with one spoonful of salt until light. Warm 
one cup of milk with a lump of butter size of a wal- 
nut until butter melts. Pour into beaten yolks, 
then add one tablespoonful of flour rubbed to a 
paste with milk. Add a pinch of salt to the whites 
of eggs and beat until stiff. Fold into the mixture. 
Have a pan larded on the side, and a tablespoonful 
of lard in it quite hot, pour in omelet and cook on 
top of stove until well set then put in a quick oven 
to brown. Serve on hot plate at once. 

Mrs. H. D. Becker. 

OMELET. 

3 eggs, 1 cup milk, pepper and salt, 1 cup bread 
crumbs. Heat pan, pour in 1 tablespoonful butter 
and lard, then put in the bread crumbs. Pour 
over this the well beaten eggs and milk, and bake 
in a moderate oven. Do not turn. 

Ada Basehoar. 

OMELET. 

4 eggs, 3 tablespoons flour. 1 cup milk. Beat 
eggs spearately until very light. Mix all together 
and pour into a pan with a little hot lard in it. 

Mrs. E. F. Redding. 



60 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



OMELET. 

Have fresh eggs, allowing one egg for each person. 
Break the eggs in a bowl and to every egg add a 
tablespoonful of cream or milk. Some cooks prefer 
hot water. Beat thoroughly. The omelet pan must 
be very hot, using a tablespoonful of butter to 6 
eggs. Turn the mixture into the pan, run a thin 
bladed knife under the bottom so as to let that which 
is cooked get above. Begin at one side and carefully 
roll the edge over and over till it is all rolled up, 
then let it stand a moment to brown. Do not let 
it cook solid. Turn on a hot platter, season and 
garnish. Mrs. J. S. Moul. 

OYSTER OMELET. 

Beat 6 eggs to a light froth, add \ cup of cream, 
salt, and pepper. Pour into a frying pan with 1 
tablespoonful of butter and drop in a dozen large 
oysters. Fry a light brown. Double over and send 
to table immediately. A. F. Barker. 

BEAUREGARD EGGS. 

3 eggs, 1 tablespoonful of flour, \ pint milk, 5 
squares toast, 1 tablespoonful butter, salt and pepper 
to taste. Boil eggs hard, remove shells, chop whites 
fine, take yolks through potato ricer, or chop very 
fine. Have toast ready on hot plate, put the milk 
on to boil, rub butter and flour together in saucepan, 
add whites, salt and pepper, a generous teaspoonful 
of fine cut parsley, let boil up once, cover the toast 
with layer of this sauce, sprinkle over all the chopped 
yolks and serve. Mrs. J. T. Rebert. 

BAKED EGGS. 

Pour a little water into individual baking dishes. 
Break the eggs into these and cover, and set in the 
oven. Bake five minutes. Just before serving add 
lump of butter and the seasoning. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 61 



STUFFED EGGS. 

Boil hard 1 doz. eggs, peel, cut in half cross wise, 
take the yolks out, put them in a bowl, mash well, 
add butter size of shellbark, salt and pepper, and a 
little parsley, enough cream to make a smooth 
mixture, put back into egg, dip in raw egg well 
beaten, roll in bread crumbs and fry in hot lard. 

Mrs. Paul Hoke. 

SMOTHERED EGGS. 

Fry eggs. Fry bread crumbs in brown butter, 
and sprinkle over top of eggs. 

Mrs. C. E. Bortner. 

DEVILED EGGS. 

Hard boil eggs; shell and cut in halves lengthwise, 
scrape out the yolk and rub smooth with vinegar; 
salt, pepper and mustard to taste; heap into the 
halved whites and serve on lettuce leaves. 

Mrs. C. E. Bortner. 

SCRAMBLED EGGS WITH HAM. 

Melt 3 tablespoonfuls of butter in frying pan, 
put into it 1 cup of cold boiled ham, finely chopped, 
stir until thoroughly heated. Have ready 3 eggs, 
slightly beaten, and mix with 3 tablespoonfuls 
of rich milk. Stir and cook until egg is set. Garnish 
with parsley. C. G. M. 

EGG CHOPS. 

9 hard boiled eggs, 1 onion, medium size, celery 
tips. Chop together, not too finely. Make cream 
sauce of 1| cups milk and 3 tablespoonfuls flour 
boiled until thick. Mix all together, seasoning with 
salt and red pepper. When perfectly cold form into 
chops, dip into bread crumbs, then into egg, and 
then again into bread crumbs. Swim in hot lard. 

Mrs. A. R. Mundorff. 

SNOW EGGS. 

Butter thoroughly the inside of as many custard 
cups as eggs you wish to serve, the eggs are best 



62 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



prepared separately. Separate the white from the 
yolk of the egg and beat the white, with a little salt, 
to a stiff froth. Put this into the buttered cup, 
make a hole in the middle in which to put the yolk, 
which ijs not beaten, but left unbroken as it comes 
from the egg, when ready place the cups in a sauce 
pan of boiling water, letting the water come half 
way up the cup. Cook this until the white is set 
firmly. Invert a warm plate over each cup and turn 
out egg. Sprinkle chopped parsley on top, if desired, 
serve at once. Mrs. W.W.H. 

EGG FLAKES. 

Allow 2 tablespoonfuls of sweet milk to every egg. 
Add butter the size of a walnut and a pinch of salt 
to the required milk, and heat it to almost boiling 
point. From a saucer slip the eggs, one at a time, 
into the milk. With a thin knife cut the eggs into 
pieces, then carefully free the mixture from the 
bottom of the pan. Watch closely lest the eggs 
harden, remove from the fire before they are quite 
done, turn up from the bottom of pan and let stand 
a minute before serving. If properly cooked the eggs 
will have the appearance of yellow and white flakes. 
An excellent breakfast dish. Edith Hesson. 

CREAMED EGGS. 

Beat 4 eggs until well mixed, add \ teaspoonful 
salt and 1 cup milk, then 2 tablespoonfuls butter. 
Cook over hot water until mixture thickens slightly, 
stirring constantly. Serve at once. 

Mrs. H. S. Ehrhart. 

EGG CROQUETTES. 

Boil eggs till hard. Peel, cut in half. Remove 
yolk. Mash with back of spoon. Add melted butter, 
salt and pepper, and sweet cream to make a soft 
paste. Refill the whites of eggs. Put together to 
form whole egg. Dip in beaten egg and cracker 
crumbs. Drop in hot lard and fry a golden brown. 

Mrs. E. K. Eichelberger. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 63 



Fruits, Etc. 



APPLE FRITTERS. 

1 pint flour, 1 teaspoonful baking powder, 1 egg, 
little salt, milk enough to make batter about consis- 
tency of thick cream. Core, pare and slice apples, 
dip in batter and fry in hot lard. Sprinkle with 
granulated sugar before serving. 

Mrs. J. EL Brough. 

APPLE FRITTERS. 

1 J cups flour, | teaspoonful salt, beat 2 eggs slight- 
ly, add gradually J cup cold water. Beat briskly 
until light, add J cup milk. Now add the flour, beat 
smooth, add 2 scant teaspoonfuls baking powder. 
Pare, remove seed pits and cut apples into circles. 
Dip a slice of apple into the batter then drop into 
a pan containing hot lard. Brown and turn. Fry 
until apple is tender. E. H. 

BAKED APPLES. 

Pare apples, take out the core, fill with sugar. 
Cream together J cup butter, 1 tablespoonful flour, 
add 1 cup hot water, pour over apples and bake a 
nice brown. Mrs. Al. Long. 

STEWED FRUIT. 

1 lb. figs, 1 lb. prunes, 1 lb. prunellas, J lb. sugar. 
As a substitute for prunellas 2 lemons can be used, 
when 1 lb. of sugar will be required. Cut lemons 



64 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



into small pieces, pour 1 quart of boiling water over 
fruit and let simmer for an hour or more. 

Mrs. A. C. Matthews. 

BAKED PEARS. 

Pare, halve and core well ripened pears. Place 
in deep bake dish with water and sugar. Dot pieces 
of butter into each hollow. Stick whole cloves into 
each half. Bake until soft and slightly browned. 
Quinces may be baked in the same way, but care 
should be taken to see that they are stewed until 
tender before placing them in the bake dish. 

FRENCH FRITTERS. 

1 pt. milk, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoonful of salt, 2 tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder, 1 tablespoonful of sugar, 
and enough corn flour to make a batter. When 
the lard in the frying pan is hot drop a spoonful 
of the batter into the pan. Brown and turn the 
fritter on the other side until it browns. Serve hot. 

VIRGINIA FRITTERS. 

Put a pint of water into which has been stirred 
a teaspoonful of salt over the fire and bring to a 
hard boil. Add a teaspoonful of butter and without 
removing from the fire, turn into the boiling water 
two cupfuls of sifted flour. Stir steadily until it 
has boiled 3 minutes. The flour will have absorbed 
all the water. Turn the paste into a bowl and set 
aside to cool. When cold stir into the paste the 
well beaten yolks of four eggs, and when these are 
well incorporated with the paste, add the beaten 
whites. Drop by large spoonfuls into boiling fat 
and cook until brown. Serve hot with sugar or a 
sauce. 

Mrs. H. D. Becker. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 65 



Vegetables, Cheese Dishes 
and Noodles 



Young peas, canned tomatoes, green corn, aspar- 
agus, spinach, Brussels sprouts — 15 to 20 minutes. 

Rice, potatoes, macaroni, summer squash, celery, 
cauliflower, young cabbage, peas — 20 to 30 mijnutes. 

Young turnips, young beets, young carrots, young 
parsnips, tomatoes, baked potatoes, sweet potatoes, 
onions, cabbage, cauliflower — 30 to 45 minutes. 

String beans, shell beans, oyster plant, winter 
squash — 45 to 60 minutes. 

Winter vegetables — One to two hours. Old 
beets, forever. 

SUGGESTIONS. 

Potatoes. — Peel very thinly as the best part of 
the potato is nearest the ski|n. The great point in 
cooking potatoes is to serve them as soon as they are 
done. When boiled, baked, fried or stewed, they 
are rendered watery by continuing to cook them 
after they reach the proper point. For this reason 
potatoes to bake or boil should be selected so as to 
have them nearly the same size. 

MAJORS WHITE POTATOES. 

Roast potatoes until soft, take from oven, cut 
off top and remove from shell. Put in dish and 
season with salt, pepper and butter; and milk 
enough to moisten. Beat this well, and replace in 
shells with bread crumbs on top. Put in oven to 
brown. Mary Zinn. 



66 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



FRENCH FRIED POTATOES. 

Select good sized potatoes, pare and cut lengthwise 
about | in. thick. Roll in flour and swim in lard. 
Season with salt. 

Mary Zinn. 

SARATOGA CHIPS. 

Pare potatoes and slice thin on slaw cutter, put 
in ice water, remove and wipe dry. Drop in hot 
lard, stir until light brown and crisp; remove quickly 
with skimmer and sprinkle with salt. 

Nadine N. Gitt. 

ESCALLOPED POTATOES. 

Pare and slice potatoes. Put small lumps of 
butter, about 4, in the bottom of a baking dish. 
Put on top of the butter a layer of potatoes, then 
small pieces of butter and then salt and pepper, 
then another layer of potatoes and so on, alternating 
until the dish is nearly full. Pour in milk, not enough 
to cover, put into a fairly hot oven and bake from 
f to 1 hr. When quite brown put on top a greased 
paper or a pie pan. 

Mrs. H. S. Ehrhart. 

ESCALLOPED POTATOES WITH EGGS. 

Boil 1 doz. good sized potatoes, skin while hot and 
slice 1 doz. hard-boiled eggs, also slice while hot. 
Have ready a sauce of butter, flour and cream, 
same as for croquettes. Butter a pudding dish, put 
in alternately a layer of potatoes and eggs, cover 
with the sauce, put bread crumbs over top and 
brown in oven. Serve hot. 

Mrs. Geo. N. Forney. 

HASHED BROWN POTATOES. 

1 qt. of cold boiled potatoes cut into dice and 
sprinkle with pepper. Melt 1 tablespoonful of butter, 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 67 



1 scant spoonful of onion, cook until yellow, add a 
tablespoonful of flour, when slightly brown add 1 
cup stock, cream, or water; season with salt. Add 
potatoes until they have absorbed nearl|y all the 
sauce. Boil about 10 minutes. Melt 1 teaspoonful 
of butter in a pan, add potatoes, stir several times, 
cook until they have formed a brown crust under- 
neath. Turn over like an omelet and serve; add 
parsley before taking out of pan. 

Annie G. Zieber. 

LYONNAISE POTATOES. 

Cut cold potatoes into small pieces, season with 
salt and pepper, add 1 teaspoonful chopped parsley. 
Put 1 teaspoonful butter on fire in saucepan, when 
hot add a slice of onion, fry brown, then add potatoes 
and fry a light brown. Mrs. G. D. G. 

POTATO FRITTERS. 

Take 2 cups cold mashed potatoes, add 1 cup 
milk, 2 well beaten eggs, 3 teaspoonfuls baking 
powder, 1 teaspoonful salt, 2 cups flour. Put lard, 
a small amount, into the frying pan, when smoking 
hot dip the batter out by the spoonful. Brown well 
on one side, then turn and brown on the other side, 
Serve hot. E. H. 

POTATO CROQUETTES. 

1\ cups cold mashed potatoes, 1 tablespoonful 
butter, \ teaspoonful salt, dash of cayenne pepper 
and celery salt.. Mix thoroughly and add ^ tea- 
spoonful minced onion, 1 teaspoonful of minced 
parsley, 1 egg yolk, 2 tablespoonfuls cream. Form 
into croquettes, dip into the white of an egg and 
roll in fine cracker or bread crumbs. Fry in deep 
fat. Mrs. J. H. Bittinger. 

POTATO FRICASSEE. 

Cut freshly pared potatoes into dice and cove 
with cold water 10 or 15 minutes. Put a tablespoon 1 * 



68 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



ful of butter into a frying pan and when hot brown a 
small onion, chopped fine, add the potatoes with 
enough water to almost cover them, add salt and 
cook until the water has boiled away, when the 
potatoes should be soft and mealy. E. H. 

BROWNED POTATOES. 

Boil small even sized potatoes in salt and water 
until nearly soft, pour off water, and let dry. Have 
some butter and lard hot in a skillet, in which brown 
the boiled potatoes evenlv. 

Rebekah D. Gitt. 

SWEET POTATO CROQUETTES. 

Boil, peel and mash 4 large sweet potatoes, season 
lightly, with salt and pepper, add 1 tablespoonful 
of butter, 1 tablespoonful of sweet cream, a table- 
spoonful of grated onion, teaspoonful fine cut parsley; 
mix well. After cold take a spoonful at a time, 
shaping them either in tiny cylinders or in round 
balls the size of a small walnut. Dip in slightly 
beaten egg, roll in finely sifted bread crumbs and 
fry a golden brown in smoking hot lard. 

Mrs. E. B. 

CANDIED SWEET POTATOES. 

Lump butter size of an egg, 1 cup brown sugar, 
melt until it thickens. Take 3 large or 6 medium 
sized sweet potatoes, pare, and put in syrup, add 
J cup water. Boil until soft. 

Mary Zinn. 

SWEET POTATO CROQUETTES. 

2 cups hot mashed sweet potatoes, 1 teaspoonful 
salt, 1 egg, parsley, a piece of butter the size of a 
walnut, a dash of pepper. Beat the egg until light, 
add to the potatoes and then add all the other 
ingredients. Mix well and when cool form into 
cylinders. Roll first in egg and then in bread 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 69 



crumbs and fry in boiling fat. This will make 12 
croquettes. Mrs. Dr. Stick. 

SWEET POTATO PUFFS. 

3 large sweet potatoes, 1 tablespoonful melted 
butter, 1 teaspoonful salt, dash pepper, 1 teaspoonful 
chopped parlsey. Boil sweet potatoes, when cool 
mash, add butter, salt, pepper and parsley, mix 
thoroughly and put into well greased gem pans. 
Rough the top with a fork; sprinkle with brown 
sugar and bake 20 minutes in hot oven. 

Mrs. C. J. Gitt. 



GLAZED SWEET POTATOES. 

Cut cold boiled sweet potatoes into slices about 

1 inch thick, season with salt and pepper. To 1 
quart of potatoes take \ cup of melted butter, add 

2 tablespoonfuls sugar. Dip the slices into the 
liquid and place in a large pan. Cook 12 minutes 
in a very hot oven. The potatoes should turn a 
rich glossy brown in that time. Serve hot. 

E. H. 

CORN PUDDING. 

1 doz. small ears corn, 1 tablespoonful sugar, 
small cup milk, and a little salt. After putting in 
oven stir several times until it begins to get thick, 
or it will not bake in the middle. 

Mrs. Chas. Winebrenner. 



GREEN* CORN PUDDING. 

1 doz. ears green corn, score the kernels and cut 
from cob, scrape off what remains on cob, 1 pint 
milk, 2 eggs well beaten, 2 large spoonfuls flour, 
2 large spoonfuls butter, 1 large spoonful sugar, 
salt to taste, bake in well buttered dish 2 hours. 

Mrs. Edw. Smith. 



7 0 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



CORN PUDDING. 

Grate corn from 6 ears, 3 eggs beaten separately, 
\ cup of sweet milk, small tablespoonful of corn- 
starch, butter the size of an egg, 1 teaspoonful 
of sugar, salt to taste. Bake in a pudding dish. 

Mrs. J. D. Little. 

CORN FRITTERS. 

1 doz. full ears of corn, grated, yolks of six eggs 
well beaten, 1 teaspoonful of salt, § teaspoonful 
sugar, 2 rounding tablespoonfuls of flour, fold in the 
stiffly beaten whites. Bake on a hot griddle. 

Mrs. D. D. Ehrhart. 

CORN FRITTERS. 

12 ears corn, 2 tablespoonfuls flour, 3 eggs, pinch 
salt. Mrs. Hugh Hostetter. 

CORN OYSTERS. 

Grate 6 ears of corn, add 1 spoonful flour, 2 eggs, 
beat the whites very light and add last, salt and 
pepper to taste, drop by spoonfuls into butter and 
lard. Mrs. Jacob Myers. 

CORN CHOWDER. 

1 qt. of green corn, or can of corn, 1 qt. potatoes, 
diced. Put the corn and potatoes in layers in the 
baking dish. The potatoes first. Sprinkle the 
layers with salt, pepper and bits of butter, add a 
little minced onion and parsley. Add water and 
cook until the potatoes are soft, then add a little 
milk or soup stock. This is a savory dish and a 
meal with this does not require meat. 

M. Bertha Zieber. 

CREAMED ONIONS. 

Remove skins, slice onions; cook until tender 
and drain. Pour over the onions a sauce made of 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 71 



1 cup sweet milk, 1 tablespoonful of flour mixed 
with salt and pepper to taste. E. F. H. 

STUFFED SPANISH ONIONS. 

Peel the onions under water and scoop out from 
the top a portion of the center. Parboil five minutes 
and then turn upsidedown to drain. Make a stuffing 
of the chopped onion taken from the centers, soft- 
ened bread crumbs, salt, pepper and a generous 
amount of butter. Fill the onions heaping full and 
sprinkle the top with buttered crumbs. Cover and 
cook till tender, almost an hour, in a pan containing 
a small quantity of water. Let them brown a very 
little before taking from the oven. A. B. C. 

ESCALLOPED ONIONS. 

Peel and boil in salted water. Drain and put 
into a baker, a layer of onions, bits of butter, and 
a sauce made of 1 tablespoonful of flour and | cup 
of cream. Then another layer of onions until dish 
is full, sprinkle the top with bread crumbs and bits 
of butter. Bake in a slow oven nearly 1 hour, have 
enough milk to nearly cover. 

Mrs. A. H. Secrist. 

ESCALLOPED BEANS AND CORN. 

Break, and cook 2 quarts green beans. Cook 
until tender in salt water in which 2 tablespoonfuls 
of pork drippings had been added. Take 1 quart of 
green corn, cut from the cob and cook 15 or 20 min- 
utes, put into a baking dish a layer of beans then a 
layer of corn until the dish is full. Take a cup of 
milk, a lump of butter and 1 tablespoonful flour, 
mix together; pour into the dish, put into oven and 
bake \ hour. Mrs. Oliver Hesson. 

LIMA BEANS. 

Wash \\ cups of beans, cover well with cold water 
and boil 10 minutes. Pour off this water. Now add 



72 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



enough hot water to cover, a little salt, and boil 
till beans are tender. Before serving, put in butter 
the size of a large walnut and enough cream to make 
a gravy and let come to a boil. 

Mrs. Joseph Brockley. 

BAKED BEANS. 

Boil 1 qt. of medium, size white soup beans till 
almost tender. Drain and. turn into a baking dish. 
Pour over them sufficient hot water to cover, then 
add 1 teaspoonful each of salt and mustard, 2 table- 
spoonfuls of molasses, J cup of fresh or canned 
tomatoes. Cover with thin slices of bacon and 
bake 1 hour. Mrs. Frank Conrad. 

BOSTON BAKED BEANS. 

Soak 1 qt. of small pea beans in 2 or 3 qts. of 
water over night. In the morning drain and look 
over them carefully and put them in a large bean 
pot. Have \ lb. of salt pork or fresh pork will do, 
(not too fat) well washed, and place it on the beans. 
Dissolve 1 scant tablespoonful of salt and 2 table- 
spoonfuls of molasses, also if desired 1 teaspoonful 
of mustard. Pour over beans adding sufficient 
water to cover them, and place in a moderate oven 
and bake all day if to be served in the evening, 
or cover and let them remain in oven all night if 
to be served for breakfast. Water is to be added 
if necessary through the day. Mrs. W. E". Pitts. 

BEETS WITH DRESSING. 

Boil about 4 beets until soft. Place in cold water 
and remove the skins, then cut into squares. Make 
a dressing by placing on the fire a cup of vinegar, 
half a cup of sugar, half cup of thin cream or milk, 
in which has been smoothed a scant tablespoonful 
of flour. Stir the milk into the boiling vinegar, 
add salt, pepper and a lump of butter, then pour 
over hot beets. If any are left they are very nice 
served cold. Mrs. Jacob Sell. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 73 



BOILED BEETS WITH WHITE SAUCE. 

Boil until tender 3 or 4 medium sized red beets, 
peel and dice them, season with a little salt and pep- 
per. Rub a tablespoonful each of butter and flour 
together in a sauce pan, add a small cup of boiling 
water and 2 tablespoonfuls of sugar, pour over the 
beets; serve hot. 

Mrs. J. F. Rebert. 



FRIED TOMATOES. 

Slice tomatoes, roll first in egg, then in bread 
crumbs, fry in butter and lard mixed. 

Mary Zinn. 

SCALLOPED TOMATOES. 

Skin the tomatoes, cut in pieces, put a layer of 
tomatoes with a little shredded onion; season with 
pepper and salt, then a layer of bread crumbs with 
plenty of butter, then another layer of tomatoes; 
lastly 1 of crumbs. Put in oven, when brown cover 
and steam. It takes about f of an hour to cook. 

Miss Emily J. Young. 

CREAMED CABBAGE. 

Take a small head of cabbage, remove hard core, 
boil whole until tender. Serve with cream dressing. 

Mary Zinn. 

STUFFED CABBAGE— "The Texas Favorite." 

Select a good sound head a cabbage, size to suit, 
family, pour over it boiling water and let it stand 
for | hr., then drain and shake dry. Take each 
layer of leaves and pull back until you come to the 
very center. Fill with the following stuffing, putting 
a little between each layer. About a pound of ground 
beef, 2 or 3 tablespoonfuls of rice mashed in cold 
water, 2 tablespoonfuls chopped parsley, 1 small 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



onion and a dash of red pepper. Fill the cabbage 
with this and then tie up in cheese cloth, put in a 
pot of boiling water, well seasoned with salt, and 
let boil for 2 hrs. When done turn out on a flat 
dish and you may serve with cream sauce if you 
like. Serve hot. Mrs. Charles Althoff. 

FRIED CUCUMBERS. 

Pare and slice well grown green cucumbers J in. 
thick. Let soak in salt water 1 hr. or more, drain, 
wipe dry, and dip each slice into beaten egg, then 
into grated bread crumbs, and fry brown in hot lard. 
Serve immediately. 

STEWED CUCUMBERS. 

After paring the cucumbers cut them in quarters 
lengthwise and. cut off the edge which contains the 
seeds, if they are at all yellow. Let soak 10 minutes 
in cold water, if they are garden cucumbers, the 
hot-house variety are less bitter and do not need 
soaking. Put them in boiling salted water and cook 
until tender. Make a thin white sauce with 1 cup 
hot milk stirred into 1 tablespoonful of butter and 
1 of flour cooked together. Season with salt, black 
pepper, paprika and a bit of onion juice. Serve 
the cooked cucumbers on buttered toast and cover 
with the white sauce. Emma E. Bucher, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

STUFFED EGG PLANT. 

Scoop out inside of egg plant. Chop and add to 
it 1 tomato and 1 onion and lump of butter. Cover 
with water and let cook until tender and nearly dry. 
Season highly with salt and red pepper; add enough 
bread crumbs to fill egg plant. Now cover top with 
bread crumbs and bits of butter, put into oven and 
brown. Serve on lettuce leaves. 

Mrs. Frank Fry singer, 

York, Pa. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 75 



KALE. 

Boil tender in salted water 1 hour, or more. Fry 
cubes of bacon, dredge with flour, drain the kale 
and put into the bacon and dress with salt, pepper 
and vingear. Mrs. C. Kurtz. 

SPINACH. 

Cook in boiling water 5 minutes. Pour off the 
water and boil § hour in salted water. Cut up bread 
into cubes and fry in butter. Drain the spinach, 
put into the pan with browned bread cubes and 
toss together. Serve hot with either poached, or 
hard boiled eggs. 

Mrs. Isaac Herz, 

York, Pa. 

SPINACH ON TOAST. 

Wash thoroughly until satifised that all grit is 
removed, then allow it to lie for a while in cold water. 
Put into salted boiling water and boil from 20 to 30 
minutes. Drain and cut into coarse pieces with 
sharp knife, put into hot dish, sprinkle with pepper 
and salt and pour over it melted butter. Have small 
pieces of toasted bread buttered and arranged on 
a hot platter. Place portions of spinach on these 
and garnish with slices of hard boiled egg. 

C. G. M. 



FRIED SQUASH AND GRAVY. 

Cut a squash into thick slices, about one-third 
of an inch. Sprinkle with salt and let stand in water 
1 hr. or so. Drain, wipe dry, roll in flour; fry in pan 
containing some lard. Fry brown on both sides. 
When the squash is all fried if no lard remains in 
the pan put some into the pan, add 1 tablespoonful 
of flour and enough water to make gravy. Season 
and serve. Mrs. Oliver Hesson. 

Westminster, Md. 



76 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



STUFFED PEPPERS. 

Cut stems from sweet peppers, also top, large 
ones preferred, remove the seeds, fill them with 
ground meat, either cooked or uncooked, season to 
taste, cover the bottom of a deep pan with flour, 
adding salt and pepper. Stand peppers in this 
and put a small piece of butter on each, (the top) 
pepper. Put 1 cup tomato in pan around each 
pepper. When the flour is brown, then add stock 
or gravy and continue to baste until peppers are 
soft. It is well to cover to prevent peppers getting 
dry. Mrs. Nancy Hersh Yeager, 

New Oxford, Pa. 

STUFFED PEPPERS. 

Take 3 doz. medium sized green peppers, cut out 
the tops and remove the seeds. Put into salt water 
over night. Take 2 large heads of cabbage, cut fine, 
sprinkle § cup salt over it and let stand 1 hour, 
squeeze out salt water, add 4 tablespoonfuls celery 
seed, and 4 of mustard seed, and J cup grated horse 
radish. Mix well and stuff the peppers tightly with 
the slaw, being careful not to break the peppers. 

Turn upside down until all have been filled, then 
pack into a crock with the open end up. Boil 2 qts. 
of vinegar with 3 cups of sugar and pour over pep- 
pers. Let stand over night, repeat 3 successive 
mornings, after which pack in Mason jars; pour hot 
vinegar over them, and seal. Mrs. Oliver Hesson. 

Westminster, Md. 

BOILED PARSNIPS. 

Pare parsnips, cut into quarters, put them into a 
kettle containing a piece of smoked ham; boil rapidly 
until tender. Drain, and serve. 

BAKED CAULIFLOWER. 

Boil tender, split through the middle with a sharp 
knife, lay the cut sides downwards in the baking 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 77 



dish, and pour over and around it a cupful of drawn 
butter sauce. Sift fine bread crumbs on top and set 
in the oven until it begins to brown. Serve in baking 
dish with cut lemon. 

Mrs. T. J. Little. 



CAULIFLOWER TOMATO SAUCE. 

_ Boil a fresh cauliflower, drain and place on a hot 
dish. Pour over it a cupful of tomato sauce, sprinkle 
with fried bread crumbs, add lemon juice and a 
small bit of butter, and \ lb. of grated cheese. Put 
in oven until hot, and serve. 

Mrs. C. J. Gitt. 



SALSIFY. 

Scrape them, and throw at once into water, to 
which a little vinegar has been added. Then boil 
in fresh water until it has evaporated, add butter, 
pepper and salt. Mash and form into patties and 
roll in bread crumbs, fry the same as an oyster. 

Misses Zeiber. 

CARROTS. 

Trim the carrots and boil in salted water. When 
done drain off the water. Melt 1 tablespoonful of 
butter in a sauce pan, add to it 1 tablespoonful each 
of flour, pepper, salt, grated nutmeg, a pinch of 
sugar and a small quantity of cream or milk. Put 
in the carrots, simmer gently a few minutes and 
serve. Misses Zeiber. 



DREAM CAKES. 

Cut thin slices of stale bread, spread each slice 
with club cheese and press together like a sandwich, 
brown and crisp in hot butter. Serve immediately. 

Mrs. S. L. Bixler. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



CHEESE TOAST.— A TASTY BREAKFAST. 

Cut 4 slices of bread, 4 inches square. Add a 
little salt, and 4 tablespoonfuls of milk to 2 well 
beaten eggs, 1 egg will do. Dip each slice of bread 
in the mixture and fry a light brown on one side. 
Have ready 4 thin slices of cream cheese, slip one 
on each piece of bread as it is turned, cover, and by 
the time the under side of the bread is browned the 
cheese will be melted. Garnish with parsley and 
serve on hot plates. 

Mrs. Ella Bollinger. 

MACARONI WITH CHEESE. 

J lb. or 12 sticks macaroni, broken into 1 in. 
lengths, and cooked in 3 pints boiling salt water 20 
minutes. Turn into colander and pour over it cold 
water: drain. Make a sauce of 1 tablespoonful each 
of butter and flour and J cup hot milk: salt. Put 
a layer of grated cheese in bottom of bake dish, 
then a layer of macaroni, and one of sauce; repeat 
until ail is used and cover the top with fine bread 
crumbs, bits of butter and grated cheese. Bake 
until brown. Miss Blanch Hostetter. 

CHEESE FONDU. 

1 cup rolled crackers or bread crumbs, 1 cup milk, 
3 cups grated cheese, 2 eggs, whites beaten seperately. 
Bake 20 minutes in quick oven. 

M. Elizabeth Gitt. 

CHEESE AU GRATIX. 

Separate 4 eggs and beat the whites to a froth, 
add the beaten yolks, § teaspoonful of salt and a 
little pepper, 1 cup of grated cheese, § cup of milk 
and 2 tablespoonfuls of melted butter. Grease 
ramekins with butter and fill with the mixture; 
sprinkle with a light covering of bread crumbs, and 
bake in a moderate oven from 8 to 10 minutes. 

Mrs. Harry Shultz. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 79 



CHEESE SOUFFLE. 

One-fourth pound grated cheese, 2 J tablespoonfuls 
of flour, \ teaspoonful of salt, 1 cup sweet milk, 2 
eg^s separated, add beaten yolks with milk. Then 
mix with the cheese and flour, 1 teaspoonful of bak- 
ing powder, and stir all together, adding the stiff 
beaten whites of eggs last. Bake in a moderate 
oven \ to | of an hour, or until brown. 

BLUSHING BUNNY. 

One can tomato soup, one cupful finely cut cheese 
(one-fourth pound), one teaspoonful butter, two 
eggs, salt, pepper and paprika. Melt the butter 
in a pan, add the soup and cheese. When the 
cheese is melted, add the seasonings and the eggs 
slightly beaten. Stir until thick and serve imme- 
diately on toast. The quantity of cheese and num- 
ber of eggs can be varied to suit family preferences, 
depending on how cheesy and how thick it is liked. 

CHEESE BALLS. 

Mix 1 cup grated cheese, 1 tablespoonful flour 
pinch of salt and paprika and whites of 2 eggs 
beaten stiff. Shape into small balls and fry in deep 
fat. 

Mrs. Lula P. Stover. 

MACARONI AND CHEESE. 

6 ozs. macaroni, 2 tablespoonfuls butter, 4 ozs. 
grated or chopped cheese, 1 pt. milk, 2 tablespoonfuls 
flour, | teaspoonful soda. Break macaroni in \ in. 
pieces, boil rapidly for 20 minutes, drain, throw in 
cold water for few minutes. Put butter in sauce pan, 
melt, then add flour and milk, stir until it boils. 
Take from fire add cheese, stir until smooth and add 
soda. Stir macaroni into cheese dressing, put in 
baking dish, add dash pepper and salt, sprinkle 
bread crumbs on top, place here and there small 
bits butter; bake few minutes in quick oven. 

Mrs. S. L. Bixler. 



80 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



CHEESE PUDDING. 

1 pint milk, 3 eggs, 1 cup bread crumbs, 1 cup 
grated English cheese, a little melted butter, pepper 
and salt, whites of eggs beaten light and added last. 
Bake 1 hour. Mrs. Edgar Slagle. 

RICE CROQUETTES WITH ORANGE SAUCE. 

Take 1 cup of rice, scald it; bring it to a boil and 
boil 10 minutes, then add 1 quart of milk and cook 
in a double boiler until the rice has absorbed the 
milk, add 4 tablespoonfuls of sugar beaten with 
the yolks of 4 eggs. Form into cylinders, dip these 
in egg and bread crumbs and fry in hot fat. 

ORANGE SAUCE.— Grate the yellow rind of 
an orange, add to it the orange juice, mix together 
\ cup of sugar and 1 tablespoonful of flour, add \ 
pint of boiling water, bring to a boil, add the orange 
juice and rind. Serve warm. A. B. C. 

SPANISH RICE. 

Take boiled rice sufficient to fill a quart baking 
dish, add 1 large cup of fresh or canned tomatoes, 
a lump butter size of walnut, 1 sweet pepper chopped 
fine, first removing the seeds, cayenne pepper and 
salt to taste, \ cup grated cheese can be added. 
Bake in pudding dish for an hour in moderate oven. 

Mrs. Nancy Hersh Yeager, 

New Oxford. 

RICE FRITTERS. 

2 cups cold rice, 1 cup flour, 1 egg, 1 teaspoonful 
baking powder, water or milk to make a stiff batter. 
Fry in a pan in hot lard. Cold hominy may be 
used in the same manner. 

Mrs. Oliver Hesson. 

STEWED CHESTNUTS. 

Blanch 1 quart of shelled chestnuts and put on 
to boil with just enough water to cover them. Care 
should be taken to have them boil slowly, so that 
they remain whole. Should it be necessary more hot 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 81 



water may be added while boiling. When tender, 
season with butter the size of an egg, \ cup of cream 
and salt to taste. Serve as a vegetable with roast 
turkey. Mrs. C. E. Ehrhart. 

VIRGINIA NOODLES. 

The required quantity of noodles boiled and 
drained. Put into a baking dish a layer of noodles, 
then a layer of grated cheese, and a sprinkling of 
salt and pepper, then another lay of noodles and so 
on till the dish is full. Dot with butter and cover 
with thin slices of bread. Beat an egg and add to 

1 cup of sweet milk and pour over the contents of 
the dish. Bake in a rather quick oven till liquid 
is set. Mrs. W. A. Korn. 

New Oxford. 

ITALIAN NOODLES. 

Make noodles of 3 eggs. Shortly before serving 
boil them and drain off their broth. Dress with the 
following: \ lb. of chopped raw beef, 1 chopped 
onion, \ cup of chopped tomato, pepper and salt, 

2 whole cloves. Put beef and onion in a pan, with 
butter, add tomato, cloves, and seasoning, and boil 
about \ hour. If tomatoes are not juicy, add a little 
water to the above. Mrs. Laura Beard. 

NOODLES WITH TOMATO SAUCE. 

Sauce: — 1 quart of tomatoes, 1 large onion. Boil 
tomatoes until soft and rub through a sieve. Add 
finely cut onion. Add a lump of butter the size of 
a small egg. Add salt, pepper, and a large teaspoon- 
ful of sugar. 

Noodles: — Take 1 egg and add 1 tablespoonful of 
water, a pinch of salt, a dash of red pepper. Add 
flour to make a very stiff dough. Let stand for a few 
minutes. Roll very thin, cut and let dry. Then 
cook for 20 minutes in boiling salted water. Drain. 
Pour the sauce over the noodles, grate 2 ounces of 
cheese on top and place in a hot oven for 10 minutes. 
Fine luncheon dish. Mrs. J. H. Bittinger. 



82 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 

Salads and Dressings 



MAYONNAISE DRESSING WITHOUT OIL. 

1 teaspoonful ground mustard, 2 tablespoonfuls 
sugar, 2 eggs, f cup of vinegar, butter size of walnut. 
Moisten mustard with warm water, add sugar, 
butter and beaten eggs; beat well then add vinegar, 
heating well again. Put on stove until it thickens 
then on ice to chill. Mrs. Black. 

FRENCH DRESSING. 

4 tablespoonfuls qf olive oil, 1 tablespoonful of 
vinegar, stir until well mixed, then add salt and 
pepper to taste, and pour over lettuce just before 
serving. S. Elizabeth Lack, 

West Chester, Pa. 

ROQUEFORT CHEESE— FRENCH DRESSING. 

For French Dressing put 4 tablespoonfuls of oil 
in a bowl, add 3 tablespoonfuls vinegar, 1 tea- 
spoonful salt, 2 teaspoonfuls sugar, \ teaspoonful 
white pepper. Stir this 5 minutes, add J lb. Roque- 
fort cheese crumbed. Serye on lettuce. 

Mrs. G. D. Gitt. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

Mix yolks of 3 eggs with 2 teaspoonfuls of salt, 
3 tablespoonfuls of sugar, 1 teaspoonful mustard. 
Beat well then add 2 tablespoonfuls melted butter, 
1 cup thick cream, \ cup hot vinegar. Cook over 
water like custard. This will keep in a cool place 
for weeks. Mrs. R. L. Ehrhart. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



83 



FRUIT SALAD DRESSING. 

Cream butter the size of a walnut with J cup of 
sugar. Beat 2 egg yolks and add the juice of 1 
orange and \ lemon. Pour this into the butter and 
sugar and cook until thick. Cool. Add 1 cup of 
whipped cream when ready to serve. 

Mrs. C. Stahr Hamm, 

Kingsport, Tenn. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

To 2 chickens use 12 hard boiled eggs. Work 
smooth with a spoon, stir in slowly \ teacupful 
vinegar, add \ lb. butter, melted, 1 teaspoonful 
mustard, 2 tablespoonfuls sugar, \ cup sweet cream, 
a dash of red pepper. Beat all together, let come 
to a boil and set away to cool. Cut chicken and 
celery fine, equal parts; salt and mix. Add dressing 
just before serving. 

Mrs. H. M. Stokes. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

The white meat of a cold boiled or roasted turkey 
or chicken, f same quantity of chopped celery, 
2 hard boiled eggs, 1 teaspoonful salt, 1 teaspoonful 
pepper, 1 teaspoonful made mustard, 3 teaspoonfuls 
salad oil, 1 raw egg, 2 teaspoonfuls white sugar, 
and \ cup vinegar. Mince the meat well, removing 
all fat and skin, cut celery \ in. long. Add dressing. 

Mrs. C. M. Stock. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

1 large chicken boiled, when cold chop into a 
dish, over which throw a towel slightly dipped in 
cold water to keep the meat moist. Have a heaping 
pint of cut celery and put the celery between clean 
cloths to dry. Take 1 tablespoonful best mustard, 
the yolk of 1 raw egg, drop into a dish large enough 
to hold all the dressing, beat well for 10 minutes, 
and slowly add to the mustard, 1 tablespoonful 



84 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



vinegar. When well mixed add three-eighth bottle 
of oil, a drop at a time, always stirring the same 
way. Rub the yolks of 6 hard boiled eggs very 
smooth and stir in \ cup vinegar. Pour this mixture 
to the mustard, oil, etc., stirring together as lightly 
as possible. Add to the chicken the celery, a little 
yellow pickle, \ loaf of stale bread crumbs and the 
oil taken from the water in which the chicken was 
boiled. Salt and pepper to taste. Put the dressing 
on just before serving. Virginia Fitz. 



SALMON SALAD. 

1 can of salmon, picked fine, 3 sweet pickles, and 
3 hard boiled eggs chopped fine, 4 crackers rolled 
fine. Mix all together. 

DRESSING. — \ cup of vinegar, 1 beaten egg, 
2 teaspoonfuls of prepared mustard, \ cup of milk, 
1 tablespoonful of butter. Cook to a smooth sauce 
and when cold pour on the above. 

Mrs. Henry Jones. 



SALMON SALAD. 

1 can salmon, 15 crackers rolled fine, 5 good sized 
pickles chopped fine, 5 hard boiled eggs, whites 
chopped fine, yolks rubbed fine in a tablespoonful 
butter, salt and pepper to taste, vinegar enough to 
mix. 

SWEET BREAD SALAD. 

1 pint sweet breads, put into boiling water with 
a bay leaf, and 1 teaspoonful salt, and simmer about 
3 hrs. Drain and immerse in cold water until chilled. 
Take chopped celery same amount as sweet breads. 
Add some English walnuts and Malaga grapes. 
Use mayonnaise with oilve oil, and when adding 
this to ingredients, add a little whipped cream. 

M. Elizabeth Gitt. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 85 



POTATO SALAD. 

3 potatoes, J grated onion, 2 hard boiled eggs, 
| tablespoonful salt, small amount of celery. 

DRESSING. — 1 egg, 1 tablespoonful sugar, \ 
tablespoonful butter, \ tablespoonful flour, \ table- 
spoonful mustard, i pint vinegar, \ pint milk, \ 
tablespoonful salt. Beat egg, then add mustard, 
flour, sugar, salt; beat and add vinegar and stir well, 
then add milk slowly, put over fire and stir; when 
thick as custard, add butter, and pour over salad. 

Mrs. Ed. Michael. 

POTATO SALAD. 

6 cold boiled potatoes of medium size, \ medium 
sized onion, 1 tablespoonful finely cut parsley, 
4 tablespoonfuls olive oil, 2 tablespoonfuls vinegar, 
salt and pepper. Slice potatoes, onion and parsley 
in a bowl. Mix salt, pepper and olive oil thoroughly, 
then add vinegar. Stir well and pour over potatoes, 
etc. Toss all well with fork so that dressing is well 
mixed thoroughly. Let stand 1 hour and serve very 
cold. Mrs. Aimee Wirt Winebrenner. 

POTATO SALAD. 

10 good sized boiled potatoes, 2 hard boiled eggs, 
2 onions, 2 bunches celery, pepper, salt and sugar 
to taste. 

DRESSING. — 1 teacupful vinegar, \ cup water, 

1 tablespoonful mustard, butter the size of an egg. 
Boil all together and when cool stir in cup sweet 
cream. Mrs. J. J. Schmidt. 

CABBAGE SALAD. 

Cut part of a head of cabbage into slices, also 

2 green peppers. Sprinkle the cabbage and peppers 
with a little salt, and mix thoroughly. Pour over 
salad dressing, or dress with oil and vinegar. 

Mrs. A. R. Brodbeck . 



86 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



CABBAGE SALAD WITH BOILED DRESSING. 

Cut a head of cabbage fine. Heat in a sauce pan 
1 cup of vinegar, tablespoonful of butter, 1 of sugar, 
| tablespoonful of made mustard, salt and pepper. 
In a second vessel heat two-thirds of a cup of milk, 
stir into it 2 beaten eggs and cook until they begin 
to thicken. When the vinegar boils pour on the 
shredded cabbage, pour all back into the sauce pan; 
stir 1 minute with a silver fork, add the boiled milk 
and eggs and stir well, stir into a covered bowl and 
set where it will cool suddenly. Serve in a glass dish. 

Mrs. A. M. Wolf. 

CABBAGE SALAD. 

Shave a hard white head of cabbage into small 
strips, take the yolks of 3 well beaten eggs, cups 
of good cider vinegar, 2 teaspoonfuls of thick cream, 
1 teaspoonful of mustard mixed in a little boiling 
water; salt and pepper to suit the taste. Mix all 
but the eggs together and let it boil, then stir in 
the eggs rapidly; stir the cabbage into the mixture, 
and stir well. Mrs. F. M. Miller, 

New Oxford, Pa. 

FRENCH SLAW. 

Cut your cabbage, salt and let stand for 1 hour, 
drain, add sugar, vinegar, mustard, celery, pepper 
to suit taste. Jar. 

Mrs. Geo. H. Grove. 

CREAM SLAW. 

One-half head cabbage, 1 cup thick sweet cream, 
\ cup sugar, vinegar and salt. Cut cabbage quite 
fine, add cream and sugar. Beat all together with 
fork until very light and foamy, then add vinegar 
to taste and little salt and beat again. Cabbage, 
cream and vinegar must be very cold before using. 
Sour cream can be used, but sweet cream preferred. 

Mrs. Cora Graybill. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 87 



EGG SALAD. 

One half dozen eggs and \ doz. sweet pickles. 

DRESSING. — \\ cups vinegar and water, 2 or 
3 heaping tablespoonfuls of sugar, teaspoonful of 
salt, lump of butter the size of an egg. Boil and 
pour over the beaten yolks of 2 eggs, set on the stove 
and boil a few minutes, then add a pinch of cayenne 
pepper and a little mustard, mixed in water, and J 
teaspoonful cornstarch, mixed in water, boil a few 
minutes, take off the stove and pour into the beaten 
whites of 2 eggs, set aside until cold. Cut the hard 
boiled eggs and pickles into dice, then pour the 
dressing over them, add a few tablespoonfuls of 
whipped cream. This makes it look dainty and 
nice. Garnish the dish with finely cut lettuce. 

Mrs. Paul Winebrenner. 

BEET SALAD. 

Boil 6 small beets until tender, and when cold 
chop them. Boil 6 eggs hard and remove the whites 
from three of them to garnish, chop the rest of the 
eggs, but not in with the beets. Salt and pepper the 
beets and eggs, after they are chopped, and mix 
them together very lightly. Put in a dish and pour 
over them any good salad dressing. Granish the top 
with rings cut off the whites of the three eggs. 

Mrs. A. R. Brodbeck. 

ASPARAGUS VINEGARETTE. 

For 1 qt. take 4 cucumbers, 1 raw onion, 1 table- 
spoonful capers, 1 bunch parsley, 2 doz. olives. 
Chop all together then add \ pt. vinegar and oil, 
(| pt. water if vinegar is strong.) Season with salt 
and pepper. Pour over cold asparagus. 

Mrs. Howard Young. 

ASPARAGUS SALAD. 

Take tips from 1 lb. cold cooked asparagus, cut 
1 cucumber into thin slices. Let stand 1 hr. in cold 



88 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



water, add J teaspoonful salt. Mix lightly with 
tips, cover with mayonnaise on lettuce. 

STUFFED TOMATO SALAD. 

Hollow whole tomato, and fill with cut celery, 
red, green and yellow sweet peppers. Season with 
salt and pepper. Cover with mayonnaise dressing. 
Serve on lettuce leaves. 

Mrs. Howard Young. 

TOMATO ASPIC. 

Soak 1 box gelatine in 1 pt. cold water 2 minutes, 
add 2 pints tomato juice, heated. Season with salt 
and pepper. Put into molds. Serve on lettuce 
leaves. Mrs. Geo. D. Gitt. 

TOMATO, CELERY AND PEPPER SALAD. 

Select large, firm tomatoes. Make three cross 
cuts half way into tomatoes, giving a scalloped 
effect. Fill centers with chopped celery and red 
and green peppers salted to taste. Place on let- 
tuce leaves and pour over all French or May- 
onnaise dressing. 

Mrs. Howard Hoke. 

TOMATO SALAD. 

Remove inside of large tomatoes and in the cup 
thus formed place finely chopped cabbage which 
has first been seasoned with celery salt, a dash of 
pepper, salt, and vinegar. 

DRESSING.— Cover pulp with water and boil 
until soft. Strain and acid lump of butter, salt and 
pepper. Thickeh with flour to the consistency of 
cream. Serve on lettuce leaves. 

Mrs. 0. H. Hostetter. 

TOMATO SALAD. 

6 good sized tomatoes peeled and cut into small 
pieces, 2 onions chopped fine, 2 hard boiled eggs cut 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 89 



into blocks. Make a dressing of sour cream and 
vinegar, using less vinegar than cream, a little sugar, 
pepper and salt. Pour the dressing over the tomato, 
onion and egg. 

Mrs. Henry Jones. 

TOMATO AND CELERY SALAD. 

2 tomatoes, or canned tomatoes may be used, 
1 large stalk celery, 3 hard boiled eggs, 3 tablespoon- 
fuls olive oil, 2 tablespoonfuls vinegar, 1 scant tea- 
spoonful salt, \ teaspoonful dry mustard, J teaspoon- 
ful sugar. Mash hard boiled yolks of eggs, add to 
them salt, sugar, mustard, olive oil and vinegar. 
Stir until smooth. Cut up in fine pieces tomatoes, 
celery, and hard boiled whites of eggs. Pour over 
this the dressing and let stand a while before serving 
on lettuce. 

Mrs. Aimee Wirt Winebrenner. 

SURPRISE SALAD. 

Remove inside of large tomatoes and in the cups 
thus formed place a hard boiled egg with the shell 
removed. Cover with a salad dressing and serve 
on lettuce leaves. 

Mrs. 0. H. Hostetter. 

SHRIMP AND TOMATO SALAD. 

Take 1 small tomato quartered for each plate 
on lettuce, surround with shrimp, serve with dress- 
ing. Mrs. Charles Billmyer. 

DRESSING. 

Take yolk of 1 hard boiled egg and 1 raw egg; 
mix very smoothly together in ice cold bowl, then 
add by degrees f cup oil, a few drops at a time. 
Stir with wooden spoon. When oil is half used add 
1 teaspoonful salt, then use remaining oil. If sauce 
becomes too thick thin with vinegar or lemon. Add 
last | teaspoonful English mustard. 

Mrs. Charles Billmyer. 



90 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



WINTER SALAD. 

1 head lettuce, 2 lemons, 3 juicy apples, and 1 
stalk celery. Pare apples and cut in slices, treat 
lemon likewise. Mix thoroughly with finely chopped 
celery, and cover with a mayonnaise dressing. Serve 
on lettuce leaves. 



WALDORF SALAD. 

Take equal parts of chopped celery, apples, and 
nuts; hickory nuts are best. Mix with a dressing 
made with the yolks of 5 eggs, \ cup vinegar, salt, 
pepper, and 1 teaspoonful of sugar. Cook until 
it thickens, but do not boil. Thin with cream. 

Mrs. Frank Bussom. 



BANANA SALAD. 

Cut bananas into three parts, dip into mayonnaise, 
and roll in ground nuts. 

Mrs. Frank Bussom. 



PINEAPPLE SALAD. 

Halves of Hawaiian pineapples on lettuce leaves. 
Pour over them French dressing, and place Maras- 
chino cherries on top of slices. 

Mrs. Howard Hoke, 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

FRUIT AND NUT SALAD. 

2 large oranges, 2 apples, 1 banana, few white 
grapes, 1 doz. almonds, \ doz. English walnuts 
or shell-barks. Take pulp and juice of oranges, 
cut apples, banana, white grapes, and nuts in small 
pieces. Mix all together, add sugar if desired. Serve 
in cups of half orange skins. Put on ice to chill. 

Mrs. Black. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 91 



FRUIT SALAD. 

3 oranges and 1 cup pineapple cut in small pieces, 
1 tumbler preserved white cherries, 1 lb. Malaga 
grapes and sprinkle cocoanut on top. Sweeten to 
taste. Mrs. W. F. Sheeley. 

FRUIT SALAD. 

2 oranges, 2 bananas, 12 English walnuts, 1 head 
lettuce, mayonnaise. Wash and put the lettuce to 
crisp. Peel oranges and cut in small pieces; peel 
bananas and cut in thin slices. Arrange lettuce for 
individual serving; place a layer of bananas, then 
oranges; dress with the mayonnaise, garnish with the 
English walnuts broken into small pieces or halves, 
as you like. Mrs. E. Bollinger. 

FRENCH FRUIT SALAD. 

2 oranges, 2 bananas, 12 English walnuts, 1 head 
lettuce, and mayonnaise. Wash and put the lettuce 
in cold water. Peel the oranges, cut into slices, 
remove the seeds, then cut the lettuce into small 
pieces. Peel the bananas and cut crosswise into thin 
slices. Crack the nuts and break the meats into 
small pieces. Arrange the lettuce for individual 
serving, place a layer of bananas, then oranges, 
then bananas in each lettuce cup, and dress with 
the mayonnaise. Garnish with the nuts and serve. 

Mrs. F. M. Miller, 
New Oxford, Pa. 

TWENTY-FOUR HOUR SALAD. 

4 egg yolks, juice of one lemon, J cup cream. Put 
this in a double boiler and cook until thick. When 
cold add the following: \ pint whipped cream, 1 
pound white grapes cut in halves, 10 cents worth of 
almonds which have been blanched, 10 cents worth 
of marsmellows, 1 small can of pineapple. Keep in 
cool place about 24 hours. This will serve eight 
people. Mrs. Emil J. Stout. 



92 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



FRUIT SALAD WITH DRESSING. 

1 medium sized pineapple, 3 oranges and 3 ba- 
nanas. Cut fruit into small cubes, pour dressing 
over and stand on ice for half an hour before serving. 

DRESSING.— 2 eggs, \ cup light colored fruit 
syrup, | cup sugar, J cup lemon juice. Beat eggs 
and sugar, add fruit juice and lemon juice. Stir 
constantly in a double boiler until it begins to thick- 
en. Cool, beat a little and serve on the sliced fruit. 

Mrs. H. D. Becker. 



CELERY AND NUT SALAD. 



Chop fine 1 bunch celery and \ lb. English walnut 
kernels. Salt and pepper to taste. Mix and after 
placing on lettuce nests and adding French dressing, 
place halves of white grapes seeded over top of 
salad. Use French dressing. 

Mrs. Howard Hoke, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



CHEESE AND NUT SALAD. 



Cake of Philadelphia cream cheese. English 
walnut kernels. Beat cheese to a soft cream; chop 
kernels in meat chopper. Mix with cheese and 
make into balls and place two on nests of lettuce 
leaves. Use French dressing. This salad is very 
nice when the nuts are left in halves and placed on 
sides of cheese balls. 

Mrs. Howard Hoke, 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



93 



NUT SALAD. 

1 cup of nuts, 1 cup of apples chopped fine, \ cup 
of celery cut fine. Mix thoroughly and when ready 
to serve, pour over the mixture, mayonnaise dressing. 

Mrs. Wesley Myers. 

CHESTNUT SALAD. 

Blanche 1 pint of shelled chestnuts, and boil 
slowly in salted water until tender. Drain and 
allow to cool. To the chestnuts add an equal 
quantity of celery cut fine. Mix with a mild may- 
onnaise dressing and serve on lettuce leaves. 

Mrs. C. E. Ehrhart. 



94 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



Pickles, Etc. 



SWEET PICKLE FOR ALL KINDS OF FRUIT. 

First pare the fruit and drop in a pan of water. 
For each 7 pounds of fruit prepare a syrup from 

3 pounds granulated sugar and 1 pint of good 
vinegar. Boil the fruit in clear water until it can 
be pierced with a fork, then drop them in the boiling 
syrup and pour in from 1 to 2 tablespoonfuls of 
the mixed spices, or whole spide, to suit taste. Seal 
in air tight jars. The less cooking you give the 
fruit the lighter the color of pickles will be. 

Anna E. Harlacher. • 

CHILI SAUCE. 

24 ripe tomatoes, 10 onions, cut, 6 green peppers, 
cut, 4 tablespoonfuls salt, 8 tablespoonfuls sugar, 

4 teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, 4 teaspoonfuls of cloves, 
4 teaspoonfuls of ginger, 8 teacupfuls of vinegar. 
Boil slowly 2 hours in a porcelain kettle. Spices 
must be ground. Tomatoes peeled. 

Mrs. Henrietta Stahl. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

1 peck ripe tomatoes, 12 onions, 5 peppers, 5 table- 
spoonfuls sugar, 4 tablespoonfuls salt, 1 tablespoonful 
mustard, 1 tablespoonful ginger, 1 tablespoonful 
cloves, 1 tablespoonful allspice, 1 tablespoonful 
celery seed. Boil 1 hour, add 5 cups vinegar, boil 
an hour longer. Bottle while hot. 

Amelia Fisher. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 95 



CHILI SAUCE. 

Remove seeds from pks. of ripe tomatoes, 
cut into halves, cook soft, strain through a colander, 
and measure. To 5 qts. of tomatoes add 18 chopped 
sweet peppers with the seeds, 6 chopped sharp 
peppers, 12 onions cut fine, 3 cups of vinegar, 3 
cups of sugar, 4 tablespoonfuls of salt, 4 tablespoon- 
fuls of celery seed, 3 tablespoonfuls of mustard 
seed, 3 tablespoonfuls of cinnamon, 1 grated nutmeg. 
Cook till thick. 

Mrs. Harry Stair. 

PICCALILLI. 

1 qt. lima beans (large and small), kidney or soup 
beans, 6 stalks celery, 4 heads cauliflower, 2 heads 
cabbage, peppers (red, green and yellow), 3 doz. 
pickles, 6 carrots, 1 qt. onions, 1 qt. green tomatoes, 
1 qt. vinegar to 1 cup of sugar, spices to taste. 

Mrs. Edw. F. Redding. 

CHOW-CHOW. 

Chop 1 pk. green tomatoes, \ peck ripe tomatoes, 
6 onions, 3 small heads of cabbage, 1 dozen green 
peppers, seeds removed, 3 red peppers, seed removed. 
Sprinkle with salt, and put in a coarse bag. Drain 
over night. In the morning put in the porcelain 
lined kettle with 2 pounds brown sugar, \ teacup 
grated horse-radish, 1 tablespoonful each ground 
black pepper and mustard, whole white mustard 
seed, mace and celery seed. Cover with vinegar and 
boil till clear. Seal in jars. 

Anna E. Harlacher. 

CHOW-CHOW. 

1 pk. green tomatoes, \ pk. ripe tomatoes, 3 heads 
cabbage, § doz. green peppers, § doz. red peppers. 
Cut all and sprinkle with 1 cupful salt, let stand all 
night, next day strain and add 3 lbs. of sugar, 1 tea- 
cupful grated horse-radish, cover with vinegar and 



96 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



let come to a boil, then add 1 tablespoonful black 
pepper, 1 tablespoonful ground mustard and 1 table- 
spoonful of mustard seed, 1 tablespoonful ground 
cloves, 1 tablespoonful mace, and one tablespoonful 
celery seed, 2 stalks celery, 2 cents worth tumeric, 
1| quarts lima beans (boiled). 

Mrs. Sharon Smith. 



CHOW-CHOW. 

6 large white onions, 6 large sweet peppers, red 
and green, 1 head of cabbage, J peck green tomatoes, 
2 doz. medium sized cucumbers, 1 bunch celery, 
1 head of cauliflower, 1 pint small onions, and about 
50 little pickles. Slice the onions, cabbage and 
tomatoes on slaw cutter. Cut the peppers and 
cucumbers into small pieces. Put all of these with 
the cauliflower into strong salt water and boil until 
tender, but not too soft. Then drain well through 
a sieve or colander. Put back into the kettle with 
the small onions, celery and little pickles. The small 
pickles should stand in salt water several times 
before adding. Add to this J pound of white mustard 
seed, tablespoonful of celery seed, handful each of 
cinnamon bark and whole allspice, some mace and 
pint of grated horse-radish, i gallon of cider vinegar. 
Mix up some yellow mustard and add half a tea- 
spoonful of tumeric, sweeten with brown sugar to 
taste. Mix all well and let come to a boil, then 
pack in jars, having the pickle well covered with 
the vinegar. Mrs. Paul Winebrenner. 



GREEN TOMATO PICKLE. 

Slice h pk. green tomatoes, 6 or 8 red and green 
peppers, salt and let stand over night. Take 1 qt. 
vinegar, 1 cup of sugar, 1 tablespoonful whole 
cloves, mustard and celery seed, boil this well, 
squeeze tomatoes out of salt water, put in vinegar, 
boil | hour, bottle hot. 

Mrs. J. P. Barnitz. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 97 



GREEN TOMATO PICKLE. 

Slice 1 pk. green tomatoes and 1 doz. onions, 
sprinkle with salt and let them stand 24 hours. 
Strain off the brine and add 3 tablespoonfuls of 
ginger root and the following: 3 tablespoonfuls black 
mustard seed, 3 tablespoonfuls white mustard seed, 
2 tablespoonfuls unground allspice, 1 tablespoonful 
bruised cloves, 1 tablespoonful cayenne pepper, 
2 tablespoonfuls black pepper, 2 tablespoonfuls 
celery seed, 1 tablespoonful tumeric, 1\ lbs. sugar. 
Mix well the above spices after salting the tomatoes 
and onions, put in a kettle by layers. On each layer 
sprinkle a covering of spices and sugar. After these 
alternate layers of fruit and spices have been laid 
.fill up the kettle with good cider vinegar and let 
U simmer on the stove until it looks clear. 

Mrs. John A. Cremer. 



GREEN TOMATO MINCE MEAT. 

7 lbs. of green tomatoes, chop and drain, 3 lbs. of 
apples, chopped, 2 lbs. of raisins, 6 lbs. of brown 
sugar, 1 pint of vinegar, 2 tablespoonfuls of cinna- 
mon, and 1 teaspoonful each of cloves, allspice, 
salt and nutmeg. Pour 1 quart of cold water over 
the tomatoes and boil two hours. Add the rest and 
cook until done, — about f of an hour. This is very 
good for pies. 

Mrs. C. P. Wolcott. 



MIXED PICKLES. 

1 qt. onions, 1 qt. lima beans, 4 sweet peppers, 

1 hot pepper, 150 pickles, 4 heads cauliflower, 4 
bunches celery, 3 cts. worth mustard seed, 3 cts. 
worth celery seed, 3 cts. worth ground mustard, 

2 cts. worth tumeric, 2 qts. vinegar, 2 lbs. 'brown 
sugar, cloves and cinnamon bark. Boil each sepa- 
rately in salt water. 

Mrs. J. J. Schmidt. 



98 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



VIRGINIA CABBAGE PICKLE. 

3 large heads of cabbage cut very fine, 6 red pep- 
pers, 1 tablespoonful celery seed, 1 tablespoonful 
white mustard, If tablespoonfuls mixed spices, 1 
tablespoonful tumeric, \ gal. vinegar, 3 lbs. brown 
sugar. Salt the cabbage for 1 hour, heat vinegar, 
sugar and tumeric, drain cabbage and put in hot 
vinegar, and heat well but not boil, then put in 
jars and seal. Mrs. John A. Cremer. 

MUSTARD PICKLE. 

1 head cabbage, 2 heads cauliflower, 1 quart lima 
beans, 1 quart small onions, \ pk. string beans, 4 
sweet peppers, 3 bunches celery, 2 teaspoonfuls 
tumeric, 2 teaspoonfuls mustard seed, 2 teaspoonfuls 
celery seed, whole cloves and a little cinnamon bark, 
1 glass of German mustard, 2 quarts small pickles. 
Boil the cauliflower, cabbage, string beans and 
lima beans in salt water until tender. Salt cucum- 
bers, onions and peppers. Sugar to taste; vinegar 
to cover. Mrs. Ezra Bair. 

MUSTARD PICKLE. 

Take 2 qts. each of cucumbers, green tomatoes, 
cabbage and onions. Chop coarsely and mix all 
together. Boil in weak salt water until tender, 
then drain over night. 

DRESSING:— Take 2 qts. vinegar, 2 lbs. sugar, 
§ lb. ground mustard, \ cup flour, \ tablespoonful 
tumeric. Boil and pour over pickles. 

Mrs. Clayton Hollinger, 
Abbottstown, Pa. 

MIXED PICKLE. 

One-fourth peck of sliced green tomatoes, 2 doz. 
cucumbers, J peck of string beans, 1 qt. of small 
onions, 2 heads of cauliflower, 3 green peppers, 5 
cts. worth of mustard seed, 5 cts. worth of celery 
seed, 1 tablespoonful of tumeric, a few whole cloves, 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 99 



and 1 tablespoonfui of brown sugar. Salt tomatoes 
and cucumbers over night, drain next morning. 
Boil lima beans and cauliflower soft. Mix all to- 
gether, cover with vinegar and bring to a good boil 
and seal. 

Mrs. Henry Miller. 

MIXED PICKLES. 

One-fourth peck string beans, f pk. green to- 
matoes, 1 qt. small onions, \ pk. small pickles, 2 
heads cauliflower, 6 peppers, red, green, and yellow, 
2 stalks celery, 1 pt. lima beans, 1 pt. cabbage, cut 
fine, 5 cts. worth celery seed, 5 cts. worth mustard 
seed, 2 cts. worth tumeric powder, 2 oz. ground 
mustard, 2 oz. cinnamon, 5 cts. worth cloves, 2 lbs. 
brown sugar, 3 qts. vinegar, 5 cts. worth black pepper. 
Boil the lima beans, string beans, cauliflower, celery 
until tender in strong salt water and drain. Scald 
•with 3 or 4 coverings of boiling water, the green 
tomatoes, (diced) small onions', and canteloupe. 
Season well with salt. Soak over night the pickles 
and cabbage in strong salt water, drain that off and 
mix all together, with the seeds. Mix well the ground 
spices and add; boil sugar and vinegar and pour 
over pickle and seal. Mrs. H. W. Hart. 

CORN CHOW-CHOW. 

1 qt. of vinegar, 1 qt. of string beans, \ doz. red 
peppers, 1 pt. of lima beans, 1 pt. of small onions, 
1 doz. ears of corn, 2 tablespoonfuls of salt, § lb. 
of sugar, | lb. of mustard. Mix mustard and vinegar 
and bring to a scald. Cook separately the corn, 
onions, and beans till tender. Put all the ingredients 
together, boil only 5 minutes and seal. 

Mrs. Samuel Althoff. 

CUCUMBER CHOW-CHOW. 

1 doz. large cucumbers, 4 large onions, and 1 small 
sharp pepper, cut fine, and lightly salted over night. 
In the morning squeeze out, add 1 small bunch of 



100 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



celery cut fine, some celery seed, and yellow mustard 
seed. Cover with vinegar and heat all together, 
but do not let come to a boil. Jar hot. 

Mrs. Wm. Shultz. 

CUCUMBER CHOW-CHOW. 

If doz. large cucumbers, cut into small pieces, 
3 sweet peppers, red or green, J peck of white onions, 
Salt cucumbers and onions over night, separately, 
using | pint of salt. In the morning drain as dry as 
possible, add 1 lb. of sugar, J oz. of celery seed, \ 
oz. mustard seed, and \ pk. ripe tomatoes to the 
cucumbers and^ onions and peppers, cover with 
vinegar and boil until tender, and thick. About 
5 minutes before removing from fire add 2 table- 
spoonfuls of mustard moistened with vinegar. Stir 
well while boiling. 

Mrs. Kate W. Himes, 
New Oxford, Pa. 

CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

Soak pickles over night in salt water. In morning 
put in brass kettle and cover with good cider vinegar. 
Use mustard and celery seed to your own judgment. 
Piece alum size of pea, also few slices horse-radish. 
Put on fire until pickles are green, remove at once, 
pour out of brass kettle and bottle. 

Mary Zinn. 
CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

To 100 cucumbers, medium size, take teacupful 
fine salt. Wash cucumbers, pack in stone jar; 
sprinkle salt over them. Scald with boiling water 
to cover, let stand over night. Drain or dry them; 
pack in glass jars, spice with red pepper pods, whole 
black pepper grains, sliced horse-radish, and \ cup 
small onions. Boil pure cider vinegar, cover cucum- 
bers and seal. 

Mrs. McC. Davidson. ' 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 101 



COLD CATSUP. 

Pare J pk. tomatoes without scalding, cut them 
as fine as you .like. Then drain and add 1 qt. wine 
vinegar, 1 red pepper, 2 tablespoonfuls black mustard 
seed, 3 tablespoonfuls yellow mustard seed, a little 
grated horse-radish, salt and cayenne pepper to 
taste. Mrs. N. B. Carver. 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

1 pk. tomatoes, boiled and strained through a 
sieve. Add \ cup black pepper, \ cup celery seed, 
\ teaspoonful ground cloves. Tie these in a bag. 
4 onions cut fine, \ cup salt, 1\ pts. vinegar, | lb. 
brown sugar. 

Mrs. Harry Schriver. 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

1 pk. ripe tomatoes, 1 oz. salt, \ oz. mace, 1 table- 
spoonful black pepper, 1 teaspoonful cayenne, 
1 tablespoonful cloves, 7 tablespoonfuls ground 
mustard, 1 tablespoonful celery seed. Boil tomatoes 
and press through a fine sieve, return to fire, add 
seasoning and boil at least 5 hrs. Add a pint strong 
vinegar, bottle and seal and keep in a cool dark place. 

Mrs. C. M. Stock. 

MIXED PICKLE. 

| pk. string beans, \ pk. green tomatoes, 1 qt. 
small onions, 1 qt. cucumbers, 2 heads cauliflower, 
or a little cabbage, 4 peppers, red and green, 2 stalks 
celery, 1 pt. lima beans, 5 cts. worth of celery seed, 
1 oz. ground mustard, 5 cts. worth of mustard seed, 
a little tumeric, if desired. Cut vegetables fine. 
Boil in salt water separately until tender, and 
dra|n. Add 2 qts. vinegar, \\ lbs. brown sugar, boil 
a little then add vegetables and spices. Heat 
thoroughly and seal. 

Mrs. Samuel Basehoar. 



102 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



TOMATO CATSUP. 

\ bushel ripe tomatoes, cut up, and boil a little, 
pass through a fine wire sieve. Boil four hours, 
stir frequently; just before taking off the fire, add 
1 qt. cider vinegar, 5 teaspoonfuls fine salt, 2 tea- 
spoonfuls black pepper, 1 oz. each of ground cloves 
and allspice. Allow it to come to a boil and take 
off while hot. Bottle and cork well. (Before put- 
ting in the spices mix them all well with a little of 
the vinegar to prevent them from becoming lumpy.) 

Mrs. Edw. F. Redding. 

BOILED TOMATO CATSUP. 

1 pk. tomatoes cut in pieces and boiled soft, then 
taken through a sieve, put pulp in kettle and boil 
until very thick. When done boiling add 1 table- 
spoon ful black pepper, 1 tablespoonful ground cloves, 
1 tablesdoonful allspice, 2 tablespoonful mustard, 

1 tablespoonful nutmeg, 2 tablespoonfuls salt, 4 
tablespconfuls sugar, 1 qt. vinegar, and a small tea- 
spccnful of cayenne pepper. Mrs. M. 0. Smith. 

MARTYNIAS. 

Soak in salt water 2 weeks, wash and soak in cold 
water over night. Take 1 gal. of vinegar, 6 onions, 

2 large pieces horse-radish, 1 pepper pod, 1 oz. black 
pepper, \ oz. allspice, \ oz. cloves, \ oz. ginger, and 

3 lbs. brown sugar. Boil well, then add martynias, 
scald until you can pierce with a straw. This quan- 
tity for 100 martynias. Mrs. A. C. Matthews. 

GREEN TOMATO SOY. 

2 gals, green tomatoes, chopped without peeling, 
12 good sized onions sliced, 2 qts. vinegar, 1 qt. 
sugar, 2 tablespoonfuls salt, 2 tablespoonfuls ground 
mustard, 2 tablespoonfuls black pepper, 1 table- 
spoonful allspice, 1 tablespoonful cloves. Mix all 
together and stew until tender, stirring often lest 
they should scorch. Put in small glass jars. 

Mrs. C. M. Stock. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 103 



SPICED CANTALOUPE. 

6 lbs. of cantaloupe, cut as nearly one size as pos- 
sible, 4 qts. of water, 1 oz. of alum; bring to the boil- 
ing point, drop in your fruit, cook 15 minutes, lift 
and drain a short while. Then take 1 qt. of vinegar, 
3 lbs. of white sugar, 3 teaspoonfuls of yellow mus- 
tard seed, 1 teaspoonful of black mustard seed, 1 
teaspoonful whole mace, 8 in. of stick cinnamon, 
9 whole cloves, about a doz. whole allspice. Place 
the fruit in it and slowly cook until clear, requires 
about 2 hours. Mrs. J. D. Zouck. 

PICKLED CANTALOUPE. 

Pare and slice fruit and put in vinegar over night. 
Take 1 lb. sugar to 1 qt. vinegar. Cinnamon, mace 
and cloves to suit taste. Boil well, add fruit, then 
boil until you can pierce with a straw. 

Mrs. G. W. Welsh. 

SWEET PICKLED CANTALOUPE. 

5 lbs. of cantaloupe, 2 lbs. of white sugar, 1 qt. 
of cider vinegar and cinnamon bark. Pare canta- 
loupes and cut into strrps, soak in equal parts of 
vinegar and water over night. In the morning re- 
move fruit. Boil sugar, bark and vinegar together, 
add cantaloupe to syrup, cook until tender and then 
remove fruit to a platter to cool, before packing in 
jars. Continue boiling the syrup till it is quite 
thick, then pour it over fruit. Seal jars and keep in 
cool place. Miss Anna Garber. 

SWEET WATERMELON PICKLE. 

Cut the rind into small pieces and soak it for three 
or four hours, then weigh it and to 5 pounds of it 
allow 3 pounds of granulated sugar and 3 pints of 
vinegar. Put the sugar and vinegar into a saucepan 
and bring it to a boil; skim well and add a spice 
bag containing nutmeg, stick cinnamon, mace and 
whole cloves, and let it cook for 4 minutes and pour 



104 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



it boiling hot over the rind. Allow to stand all night 
and next morning drain the syrup from the rind, 
boil it up once more with the spice bag, and . again 
pour it over the rind. Repeat this process twice, 
after which put the entire mass, rind and all, into 
a preserving kettle and let it boil for 3 minutes; add 
the juice of four lemons well strained and cook for 
three minutes more. Then seal, boiling hot, in hot, 
sterilized fruit jars. 

Mrs. F. C. Bitner. 

PEPPER RELISH. 

24 peppers, mixed green, red and yellow, and 14 
small onions. Chop together, pour on boiling water 
and let stand 5 minutes. Drain. Again pour on 
boiling water and let stand 10 minutes. Drain. 
Add 1 quart of vinegar, 2 cups of sugar, and 3 table- 
spoonfuls of salt. Boil 15 minutes. Put into jelly 
glasses and when cold seal with parafine. 

Mrs. C. P. Wolcott. 



RELISH. 

2 hot peppers, 18 red peppers, 6 green peppers, 
| peck onions, 2 stalks celery, 4 cups brown sugar, 
5 cups vinegar, salt to taste. Run all through 
grinder. Scald peppers and let stand 5 minutes and 
drain. Peel onions and scald, then put into cold 
water to make crisp before grinding. Drain juice 
from onions. Put all together and boil 20 minutes. 

Mrs. L. H. Hoffacker. 



CHERRY SAUCE. 

Seed sour cherries and cover with vinegar. Let 
stand 24 hours and drain off vinegar. Take same 
quantity sugar as cherries and put first a layer of 
cherries, then sugar, etc., and let this stand a week, 
stirring every day. Put in jars and seal. 

Mrs. E. J. Chenoweth. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 105 



PLUM SAUCE. 

1 pk. plums, 7 lbs. sugar, 1 pt. vinegar, 1 table- 
spoonful mace, 1 oz. cloves, 1 oz. cinnamon. Boil 
all until thick enough to keep. Jar and seal. 

Mrs. C. M. Stock. 

SPICED PEACHES. 

3 lbs. peaches, \\ lbs. sugar, \ cup vinegar, 1 ct. 
worth cinnamon bark. Dissolve vinegar and sugar, ' 
then throw in the peaches, when soft enough to 
pierce with a starw, take out and add 1 doz. cloves, 
and cinnamon bark to the syrup. Boil well and pour 
over the peaches. Mrs. Dr. Hollinger, 

Abbottstown, Pa. 

SPICED PEACHES. 

5 lbs. of peaches pared and stoned, 2 lbs. sugar, 
1 qt. vinegar, \ oz. cloves, \ oz. cinnamon bark, . 
\ oz. mustard seed, white. Put all together and let 
stand 24 hours, then pour off vinegar and let it come 
to a boil, add peaches and boil together until syrup 
thickens. Mrs. Kate W. Himes, 

New Oxford, Pa. 

PEACH SAUCE. 

1 pk. cling peaches, 3 lbs. white sugar, 1 pt. vine- 
gar. Dip peaches in hot water and rub with a dry 
cloth, boil in water a short time, then remove and 
boil in syrup soft enough to pierce with straw. Put 
boiling in jars and seal. 

Mrs. G. W. Welsh. 

SWEET PICKLE PEACHES. 

1 pk. peaches, 2 lbs. sugar, 1 qt. vinegar, cloves 
and mace. Boil syrup 5 minutes and put fruit in, 
let come to a boil. Seal. 

Mrs. Ezra Bair. 



106 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



SPICED PEARS. 

Pare your fruit and halve them, tart pears are 
preferable; prepare a syrup with 1 qt. of vinegar, 
4 lbs. of sugar, white, 2 teaspoonfuls of whole mace, 
1 teaspoonful of allspice, H sticks of cinnamon, 
J teaspoonful of cloves. Allow fruit to cook slowly 
about 3 hrs. If the fruit is acid it will become a 
rich red in color. 

To spice Damson. — Use the same proportion of 
syrup, only do not put your fruit into it, but instead 
let the syrup come to a good boil, have the damsons 
carefully looked over and washed, and put into a 
vessel large enough and pour over them the boiling 
syrup, repeat for 3 days, the third time place in 
airtight jars, pour over the syrup and seal while hot. 

Mrs. J. D. Zouck. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 107 



Bread, Rolls, Sand- 
wiches, Etc. 



Bread, baked 

Bread, large loaves 
Biscuits and small cakes 



45 minutes 
60 minutes 
15 to 20 minutes 



TO CUT HOT BREAD. 

Use a knife greased with butter. 

TO CUT BUTTER. 

When cutting butter tear off a piece of the oil 
paper it is wrapped in. Wind the paper tightly 
around the knife blade, then cut and not a speck 
of butter sticks to the knife. 

HYGIENIC GRAHAM BREAD. 

Mix 2 pts. graham flour with 1 pt. wheat flour, 
then 1J pints of fluid, § milk and \ warm water. 
Mix in fluid 1 cake compressed yeast, \ teaspoonful 
salt. Knead until dough no longer sticks to the 
hands. Put in bake pans at once, preferably closed 
ones. Allow dough to raise only moderately. Bake 
slowly and thoroughly. This makes 2 loaves. Use 
coarsest and fresh graham flour. 

Mrs. J. R. Cornman, 

Carlisle, Pa. 

RECIPE FOR BAKING BREAD. 

Grate 2 potatoes, pour over potatoes 3| pints 
boiling water. Let stand until hike warm, then add 



108 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



1 tablespoonful sugar, 1 tablespoonful salt, \ cake 
of yeast dissolved ih hike warm water. Let stand 
over night. Next morning warm yeast, add If 
tablespoonfuls melted butter, work stiff. Let stand 
unti lit rises, then work out into loaves. . Let it rise; 
bake f hour in moderately heated oven. 

Mrs. Charles H. Richter. 

WHITE BREAD. 

1 pint of flour, 1 even tablespoonful salt, 2 heaping 
tablespoonfuls of sugar, 1 heaping tablespoonful 
of lard. Take boiling water enough to make a stiff 
sponge, stir with a fork adding a little water at a 
time. Then stir in 1 qt. of boiling water, let cool 
till luke warm, add \\ soaked yeast cakes, and 
thicken with flour to a stiff sponge. Set in a warm 
place to rise, in winter time, over night. In the 
morning knead in a large loaf, let rise again, then 
put in pans. Let rise again; bake 45 minutes in a 
moderate oven. Mrs. M. Leonard. 

RAISIN BREAD. 

Make a sponge at night of 1 qt. of sweet milk 
boiled and cooled, 1 tablespoonful* of lard added to 
the warm milk. When cool stir in 2 beaten eggs, 
f lb. of sugar, flour enough to make a soft batter, 
and 1 yeast cake. In the morning add 1 tabelspoon- 
ful of salt, If lbs. of seeded raisins, If grated nut- 
megs, flour to make a dough. Mold into loaves, let 
rise again; bake f hr. in a moderate oven. 

Miss Emma Dellone. 

SWEET POTATO BREAD. 

1 qt. flour, 1 tablespoonful baking powder, 1 
tablespoonful lard, \\ pts. cold mashed sweet pota- 
toes; 1 teaspoonful salt. Mix potatoes with other 
ingredients, add water enough for a firm dough, roll, 
cut out with biscuit cutter and bake in hot oven. 

Amelia Fisher. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 109 



RYE BREAD. 

1 cup water, 1 cup yeast, 1 tablespoonful sugar, 
1 teaspoonful salt, 1 teaspoonful lard, let rise, then 
work in pans, when light, bake. 

Mrs. C. Anthony. 
BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

1 pt. thick milk, 1 qt. graham flour, \ cup 
molasses, 1 teaspoonful of salt, 1 teaspoonful baking 
powder, 1 teaspoonful soda dissolved in a little hot 
water. Bake 1 hr. If more than this quantity is 
desired, do not double the receipt, but mix up another 
loaf the same way. 

Mrs. R. M. Wirt. 
STEAMED BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

2 cups of yellow corn meal, 2 cups of graham flour, 
3 cups of sour milk in which has been dissolved 3 
even teaspoonfuls of soda, 1 cup of molasses, 1 
teaspoonful of salt. Fill pound baking powder cans 
about f full, put on covers, and steam about 3 
hours. Raisins improve this bread. 

Mrs. C. P. Wolcott. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

1 full cup of graham flour, \ cup of white flour, 
\ cup of cornmeal, 1 cup of sour mijk, 1 scant tea- 
spoonful of soda dissolved in the milk, \ cup of 
baking molasses, a little salt. Bake in a slow oven 
about an hour in a pound coffee can with lid on. 
Raisins can be added if desired. 

BROWN BREAD. 

Place 1 small cup molasses and 1 small teaspoonful 
soda on the stove until it foams. Add 1 pint sweet 
milk, 1 teaspoonful salt, 2 cups graham flour, 4 
teaspoonfuls baking powder. Let stand 2 hours in 
tins before baking. Mrs. G. L. Terrasse. 



110 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



BRAN BREAD. 

4 cups of bran, 1 cup of white flour, J cup of mo-, 
lasses, 2 cups of sour milk in which is dissolved 2 
even teaspoonsfuls of soda, 1 teaspoonful of salt. 
Raisins, if you like. Bake in a moderate, oven for 
at least an hour. 

Mrs. C. P. Wolcott. 



GRAHAM BREAD. 

5 cups of warm water, \ cup of lard, 1 tablespoonful 
salt, add 2 soaked yeast cakes; thicken with wheat 
flour, stand in a warm place until next morning. 
Then add 1 cup of warm water, 1 teaspoonful soda 
dissolved in the water, 1 cup of molasses, 1 cup of 
sugar. Thicken with graham flour as thick as can 
stir with a fork, smooth off with a knife dipped in 
hot water. Let rise and bake 40 minutes. This 
makes 5 loaves. 

Mrs. M. Leonard. 



NUT BREAD. 

4 cups flour, 1 cup sugar, 5 level teaspoonfuls 
baking powder, 2 level teaspoonfuls salt, 1 cup 
chopped walnuts, 1 egg, If or 2 cups of milk. Sift 
flour, sugar, salt and baking powder together. Add 
nut meats, then the eggs and milk. Put in greased 
pan and let raise 20 minutes, then bake one hour in 
moderate oven. 

Mrs. Emil J. Stout. 



NUTBREAD. 

1 egg, 1J cup sweet milk, 1 cup sugar, 1J cups 
nuts, 4 cups flour, 4 teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 
Raise 40 minutes. Bake 45 minutes. 

Miss Ethel Kohler, 
Hagerstown, Md. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. Ill 



VIENNA ROLLS. 

1 qt. flour, 1 tablespoonful of butter or lard, 2 
large teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Add enough 
sweet milk to mix a soft dough, \ teaspoonful of 
salt. Roll out | in. thick, cut round, then turn over 
to form half round, wet between the fold to make 
them stick, wash on top with sweet milk. Bake in 
hot oven 20 minutes. 

Miss Anna Garber. 
MILK ROLLS. 

1 cup of yeast, 1 cup of sugar, 1 cup of sweet milk, 
2 eggs, shortening size of walnut. Let rfee second 
time, roll, cut in diamonds, put a dash of butter 
on the ends and turn up an inch or two. This will 
make 3 doz. cakes. 

Miss Anna Garber. 
PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 

2 qts. flour, rub in large spoonful lard, 1 pt. cold 
boiled milk, \ cup sugar, f cup yeast. Make hole 
in flour, put all in and stir together. Let rise a 
couple hours, then knead into a soft dough. Let 
rise a few hours again, then cut in squares and roll 
them; let rise until tea time. Bake 15 minutes. 

Mrs. Cora Grabill. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 

2 cups flour, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder, 2 
tablespoonfuls butter, J teaspoonful salt, 2 table- 
spoonsful sugar, two-third cup milk. Mix flour, 
sugar, salt and baking powder, work in butter with 
tips of fingers, add gradually the milk, mixing with 
a knife untijl it forms a soft dough. Roll one- third 
inch thick, cut with a round cutter, crease in centre 
with the handle of knife, first dipped in flour. Brush 
| with melted butter and fold over. Bake in quick 
oven 15 minutes. 

Mrs. Charles Myers. 



112 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 

1 pint hike warm sweet milk, J cup sugar, f cup 
yeast, let raise over night. In the morning add 1 
tablespoonful butter, enough flour to stiffen. Let 
raise until light. Roll out and cut in squares, fold 
up and raise again. Bake 15 minutes. 

Mrs. Edw. F. Redding. 



FINGER ROLLS. 

Make a good bread dough, before kneading the 
second time (rising) work in 1 tablespoonful melted 
butter for each quart of flour. After it has risen 
the second time roll into a sheet J- in. thick, cut 
this into strips 1 in. wide and 4 in. long. Roll these 
lightly in the hand until round, lay in a floured 
baking pan, let stand 10 min. then bake. These 
are indispensable at luncheons and teas. 

Martha M. Fisher. 



HOT ROLLS. 

1 pt. milk, \\ rounded tablespoonfuls of butter, 
2 tablespoonfuls sugar, 1 cake Fleischman's yeast, 
} teaspoonful salt; flour sufficient to make dough stiff 
enough to knead. Heat milk, dissolve yeast, add 
to it sugar, salt, butter, yeast, and lastly flour. 
Roll out about 2 hrs. before baking. Wash with 
beaten egg and bake 20 minutes. 

Mrs. J. H. Brough. 



FRENCH ROLLS. 

1 pt. yeast, 2 eggs, \ lb. lard, \ pt. milk, \ cup 
sugar. Let rise 2 hrs., knead well, adding enough 
flour to make a stiff sponge. Let rise 2 hrs. more, 
roll in sheets, spread with butter, cut into squares, 
fold over and let rise until ready to bake. 

Mrs. Harry Naill. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 113 



FRENCH ROLLS. 

2 eggs, § cup butter, J pt. sweet milk, warm to- 
gether. 1 small cup sugar, \ pt. good potato yeast. 
Mix at ten o'clock and make like flannel cakes. 
At 12 stir thoroughly, at 2 o'clock mix into soft 
dough, at 4 roll out and cut with biscuit cutter. 
Spread with butter and turn over, set to rise and 
bake. Mrs. G. T. Himes, 

New Oxford, Pa. 



BARRINGTON RUSKS. 

1 cup sugar, 1 cup milk, 1 cup yeast, 1 cup flour, 
mix over night. In the morning add \ cup sugar, 
\ cup butter mixed together. 2 eggs, reserving 
white of one beaten to a stiff froth, with sugar to 
spread on top of rusks. 

Martha M. Fisher. 



LEBANON RUSKS. 

1 teacup mashed potatoes, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup 
yeast, 4 eggs beaten separately. Stir this together 
and let it begin to raise at 8:30 a. m. Let raise 
until noon. Then add \ cup butter and lard mixed, 
enough flour to make stiff. Let raise until 3 p. m. 
Shape into rolls and raise again. Bake in a quick 
oven 15 minutes. 

Mrs. Edw. F. Redding. 



LEBANON RUSKS. 

Take a teacup of mashed potatoes, then almost 
a cup of sugar, 1 cup yeast, 3 eggs beaten separately. 
Stir together and let rise till noon. Then add a 
half cup of butter and lard mixed, enough flour to 
stiffen, then let rise again until 3 o'clock. Shape 
into rolls and let rise until tea time and bake in a 
quick oven. Mrs. Edgar Slagle. 



114 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



MORAVIAN COFFEE CAKE. 

About 6 P. M. put 2 teacupfuls of warm mashed 
potatoes, 1 teacupful of home made yeast, and 1 
teacupful white sugar, into a bowl to rise. About 
9 P. M. mix into this 1 egg, 1 teacupful melted butter, 
with enough flour to make a dough like that for 
rolls. Next morning put the dough into pans, 
smoothing it out with the palm of the hand, as it 
will be too thin to roll out. Let is rise until very- 
light, then with your thumb make deep holes, about 
an inch or more apart on the surface. Into each 
hole put a small lump of butter, a tiny pinch of 
cinnamon and a generous one of light brown sugar. 
Bake in quick oven and eat with coffee. 

Kate W. Himes. 
New Oxford, Pa 

CINNAMON CAKE AND RUSKS. 

Make a pit of flour, into this put 1 pt. of hike 
warm milk and 1 cup of homemade yeast. Stir in 
enough flour to make a batter that will drop heavily 
from the spoon. Set to rise about 6 A. M. When 
it begins to fall in the center, add J teaspoonful 
of salt, \ cup of butter and lard melted, \\ cups of 
sugar, and 3 whole unbeaten eggs. Work into the 
above mixture enough flour to make a soft dough. 
Let rise again until double the size, then work it 
lightly into a lump and let rise. Pull off small por- 
tions and shape into rusks. Brush the tops with 
1 teaspoonful of molasses and \\ tablespoonfuls 
of milk and let rise again. Shape the remaining 
dough into large cakes. Before putting these into 
the oven spread with a mixture of 1 tablespoonful 
of butter with sugar enough to stiffen and a little 
cinnamon. Bake about \ hour in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. Joseph Brockley. 

CINNAMON BUNS. 

1 cake yeast, \ cup milk, scalded and cooled; ! 
tablespoonful sugar. Dissolve yeast and sugar in 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 115 



warm milk. Add f cup of flour. Beat well, and 
let rise in warm place forty-five minutes. Add 2 
cups sifted flour, \ cup sugar, 2 tablespoonfuls 
butter, 1 egg, \ teaspoonful salt. Knead lightly, 
and cover. Let rise to twice the bulk. Roll \ inch 
thick. Spread with a mixture; 2 tablespoonfuls 
butter, 2 tablespoonfuls brown sugar, \ teaspoonful 
cinnamon. Roll out \ inch thick. Let rise till 
light. Bake in moderate oven 15 minutes. 

Mrs. E. K. Eichelberger. 

LIGHT CINNAMON BREAD AND ROLLS. 

Let 1 pint sweet milk come to a boil. Add 1 
generous tablespoonful lard while the milk is still 
hot. Cool. Add 2 thoroughly beaten eggs, J cup 
sugar, f cake yeast dissolved in a little milk, 4 cups 
flour. Let this raise over night or about 5 hours. 
Add 1 tablespoonful salt after the first raising. Add 
2 cups more of flour or enough to make the dough 
easy to handle. Form into rolls or loaves and let 
raise until light. 

Mrs. L. H. Hoffacker. 

POTATO ROLLS. 

1 cup of potatoes cut into small pieces, and cook 
until soft, mash fine, and add 1 cake of Fleischman's 
yeast, dissolved in 1 cup of warm water, and 1 cup 
of flour. Set this mixture in a warm place until 
light, then stir into it 2 eggs beaten light, \ cup 
sugar, \ cup butter, 1 teaspoonful of salt and 5 cups 
of flour; roll out and cut with biscuit cutter, spread 
with butter and fold together. Put in pans and 
let rise about an hour before baking. As the dough 
is very soft a great deal of flour must be used in 
rolling out. Bessie Newman, 

Frederick, Md. 

POTATO ROLLS. 

4 medium sized potatoes mashed fine, \\ cups 
milk or water, 1 cup lard, add to potatoes while 



116 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



hot, 1 cup sugar, salt to taste, 2 eggs beaten light, 
1 yeast cake, 1 qt. flour. Let rise, make stiff, let 
rise again, then roll out and cut. 

Mrs. Paul Hoke. 

POTATO ROLLS. 

1 cup yeast, or \ cake compressed yeast, 1 cup 
mashed potatoes, \ cup sugar, 2 eggs. Stir all to- 
gether at 10 o'clock, let rise until noon, then add 
J cup lard, and enough flour to stiffen, let rise until 
3 o'clock, then shape into rolls. 

Mrs. Wm. J. Young. 

ROLLS. 

Boil 1 good sized potato. When soft pour off the 
water and set away to cool, mash the potato and 
stir into it 3 heaping tablespoonfuls of flour, thin 
this to a rather thin batter with the potato water, 
which should be quite warm but not hot. Dissolve 
1 cake Fleisch man's yeast in a little warm water, 
and stir into the potato and flour. Let rise, which 
will take about 2 hours, then stir into this 1 large 
spoonful of lard, 1 pt. luke warm boiled milk, \ cup 
sugar and stiffen, using about 1 qt. flour. Let rise 
again about 2 hours, then roll out, cut in rounds, 
fold together, and place on tins. Set away to rise 
again, about 1 hour, then bake about 15 minutes. 
Do not let the sponge get chilled. 

Mrs. L. F. Wirt. 

POTATO POCKETS. 

2 large potatoes, boil and mash fine, add 1 small 
cup of lard, 3 eggs, 1 qt. of flour, 1 cup of yeast, 
or \ cake of compressed yeast, dissolved in a cup of 
water, a pinch of salt. Mix all well together and let 
it stand to rise, when quite light roll out and cut 
with a large round cutter, grease over the top with 
melted butter, and fold them over and let rise again, 
then bake 20 minutes. Do not be afraid if the dough 
seems too soft, any more flour will spoil them. 

Mrs. J. 0. Swartz, New Oxford, Pa. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 117 



BISCUITS. 

Mix together 1 pt. of unsifted flour, 1 tablespoonful 
of sugar, | tablespoonful of salt, 2 teaspoonfuls ot 
baking powder. Sift twice. Into this rub a generous 
tablespoonful of lard, mix with milk, roll into a 
sheet about § in. thick, spread with melted butter, 
fold over, cut into squares, and bake in a quick oven. 

Miss Emma Dellone. 



BUTTER BISCUIT. 

Sift 1 pt. of flour into a pan, make a hollow in the 
centre large enough to admit 1 cup of warm milk 
and J cup of yeast. Mix into a sponge and set to 
rise. In the morning add \ lb. of melted butter and 
knead in as much flour as will mix with another cup 
of warm milk or water. Make a soft dough, roll out 
and put into pan to rise. Bake in a well heated oven. 

Mrs. Lewis Brockley. 



DROP BISCUIT. 

3 cups of flour, 2 scant teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder, butter and lard the size of a walnut, \ tea- 
spoonful salt, milk to soften. Bake in muffin pans. 

Mrs. L. H. HofTacker. 



CREAM BISCUIT. 

2 cups of flour, 2 even tablespoonfuls of baking 
powder, 2 teaspoonfuls of salt. Sift 3 times, add 
1 cup of sweet cream, mix lightly with a fork, roll 
and bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. J. H. Fleming. 

CREAM BISCUIT. 

1 pt. of flour, 1 cup sweet cream, 1 tablespoonful 
of baking powder. Salt. 

Miss Belle Peters. 



118 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



MAPLE BISCUIT. 

Make an ordinary baking powder biscuit dough 
and roll thin. Spread with shaved maple sugar, 
ordinary brown sugar will do, and butter, using i 
as much butter as sugar. Roll up the dough and 
slice as one would cut a jelly roll for serving. Bake 
in a very hot oven and serve hot. 

Miss Emily J. Young. 

MARYLAND BISCUIT. 

Rub \ lb. lard into 3 lbs. flour, add 1 spoonful of 
salt, 1 teacupful cream, and sufficient water to make 
stiff dough. Divide into 2 parts and work each part 
well till it will break off short, and is smooth. Some 
pound it with an iron or axe until it blisters. Break 
off small pieces and work into little round cakes, 
and stick with a fork. Bake in a quick oven. These 
biscuits are nice either hot or cold. 

Mrs. H. D. S. 

SODA BISCUIT. 

1 qt. of sifted flour, 1 heaping tablespoonful of 
lard, 1 even teaspoonful of soda dissolved in 1 pt. 
of sour milk, a pinch of salt. After raising 15 or 20 
minutes, bake in an oven not too hot. If sour cream 
is to be had, use it instead of milk, and leave out 
shortening. Mrs. Lewis Brockley. 

CORN PONE. 

2 cups of corn flour, 1 cup qf wheat flour, 1 table- 
spoonful of sugar, 1 teaspoonful of soda dissolved 
in hot water, 1 egg, butter size of an egg, 1 teaspoon- 
ful salt. Milk as needed to make batter the right 
consistency. Mrs. Alice Benford. 

CORN MEAL PONE. 

One-half cup sugar, \ cup lard, 1 cup sweet milk, 
1 egg, 2 cups flour, 1 cup corn meal, 3 teaspoonfuls 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 119 



baking powder, and a pinch of salt. Mix well to- 
gether and add lard last. Mrs. H. B. Baer. 

SPOON BREAD. 

Scald 1 pt. of corn meal with 1 pt. of boiling water, 
add to this 2 beaten eggs, J teaspoonful of salt, a 
lump of butter the size of a walnut, melted, 1 tea- 
spoonful of baking powder, If pts. of sweet milk. 
Bake slowly in a pudding dish 1 hour. 

Mrs. Guy Newcomer. 

CORN BREAD. 

1 cup corn meal, 1 cup wheat flour, \ cup white 
sugar, 1 cup sour cream, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoonful soda, 
\ teaspoonful salt. Stir all together. Bake in jelly 
molds. Mrs. H. M. Stokes. 

SPIDER CORN BREAD. 

One and one-third cups corn meal, one-third cup 
wheat flour, 1 tablespoonful sugar, 1 teaspoonful 
salt, 2 heaping teaspoonfujs baking powder; 3 eggs, 

1 pt. of milk; 1 heaping tablespoonful butter, 1 cup 
of milk. Mix dry ingredients, beat eggs and add 
milk, and stir into the dry mixture. Partly melt 
the butter in a hot spider, pour in mixture and add 
the cup of milk without stirring. Bake in hot oven 
30 minutes. When done there will be a streak of 
custard through the middle. Serve from spider 
with cream and sugar. 

Ruth Conrad Henry. 

GREEN CORN PONE. 

One-half doz. ears corn, 1 pt. corn meal, 1 cup 
sweet milk, 2 eggs, well beaten, \ teaspoonful soda; 
a pinch of salt. Mrs. H. M. Rudisill. 

CORN PONE. 

2 cups thick milk, 2 eggs, 2 tablespoonfuls sugar, 

2 tablespoonfuls flour, 1 teaspoonful soda, 1 tea- 



120 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



spoonful salt. Mix all together, add corn meal 
enough to make as stiff as sponge cake dough; 2 
tablespoonfuls melted butter put in last. Bake in 
gem pans or pie plates. 

BOILED MUSH. 

3 cups corn meal dissolved with 3 cups cold 
water. Add 12 cups boiling water and boil 1 hour. 
Salt to taste. 

Mrs. L. H. Hoffacker. 

CINNAMON CAKE. 

1 qt. flour, 1 teaspoonful salt, 2 tablespoonfuls 
sugar, \ cup butter and lard, 2 eggs, 1 large cup milk, 
lukewarm, 1 cake Fleipchman's yeast, dissolved in 
milk. Knead all together until it doesn't stick to 
fingers, then roll out and spread with butter, sugar, 
and cinnamon, cut into strips, roll as buns, put into 
pans, let rise 3 or 4 hrs., then bake 20 minutes. 

Mrs. E. R. Schmuck. 

CINNAMON CAKE. 

4 eggs, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 1 cup milk, 
3 cups flour, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder. Put 
into pans, sprinkle with butter, sugar, and cinnamon. 
Bake in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. Geo. H. Grove. 

CINNAMON CAKE. 

1 cup sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, 3 cups flour, \ cup 
butter, 3 teaspoonfuls baking powder; 2 eggs. Put 
on top sugar, butter, and cinnamon. 

Mrs. S. Hoke. 

CINNAMON CAKE. 

1 cup sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, 2 eggs beaten with 
sugar, 3 cups flour, 3 teaspoonfuls baking powder, 
2 tablespoonfuls melted butter. Put batter in pans 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 121 



and spread with mixture of butter, brown sugar, 
and cinnamon. Cora Colehouse. 

SWEET CINNAMON CAKES. 

2 scant cups of white sugar, f cup shortening, 2 
eggs, 1\ cups of sweet milk, 2\ cups sifted flour, 2 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Sprinkle freely 
with cinnamon before putting in oven. 

" Mrs. Thomas Murphy. 

TEA CAKE. 

1 cup sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, 3 cups flour, 2 
eggs, 1 tablespoonful butter, 2 teaspoonfuls baking 
powder. Mix butter and cinnamon and spread over 
the top before baking. Bake in a moderate oven. 
Serve hot instead of bread. 

Marguerite Carbaugh. 

CINNAMON TOAST. 

Cut fresh white bread about one-half or three- 
eights of an inch thick, toast quickly on one side 
only and spread thickly with butter on the un- 
toasted side. Then spread generously with the cin- 
namon mixture (one tablespoonful cinnamon to 
three of powdered sugar). Dot with pieces of butter 
and place in the oven with the broiler on full. 
The rack on which the toast is placed should be in 
the lower part of the oven, not too near the flame. 
The mixture should melt and soak into the toast as 
well as brown. Do not leave it a bit longer than is 
needed to melt the mixture. Cut the toast in strips 
or halves as desired and serve with "tea and trim- 
mings." Note that it is buttered above and be- 
low the cinnamon. The whole point is to get a 
soft buttery paste, not a hard dry mass. 

CINNAMON CAKE. 

1 cup of white sugar, 2 eggs, leaving out the white 
of one, 2 tablespoonfuls of melted butter, 1 cup 



122 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



of sweet milk, 3 cups of flour, 2 teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder. Spread top of cake with the follow- 
ing: \ cup of sugar, white of 1 egg, a little cinnamon, 
and a piece of butter the size of an egg. 

Mrs. Lewis Brockley. 

DAINTY SANDWICHES. 

Mrs. George Vandervilt is very fond of dainty 
sandwiches. For example, here are sandwiches made 
of Parker House rolls. The soft interior of the rolls 
is removed and the cuplike cavity in each is filled 
with minced tongue and a little crisp bacon, with a 
little chopped celery and Spanish peppers and a 
dash of mustard. The combination of the sweet 
bread and the strongly flavored bacon and peppers 
is delectable. 

Another novel sandwich is made of thin slices of 
unsweetened Boston brown bread, well buttered 
with sweet butter and filled with a delicious mixture 
of cream cheese, ground protoid nuts, olive oil and 
just a dash of lemon juice. 

A sweet sandwich is made of thin slices of whole 
wheat bread spread with unsalted butter and filled 
with a mixture of chopped raisins, almonds, orange 
juice, a little grated orange rind and enough olive 
oil to blend the mass well together. 

MINT CUCUMBER SANDWICHES. 

For light summer refreshments dainty and deli- 
cious sandwiches may be made by dipping thin slices 
of fresh, young cucumbers in well-seasoned French 
dressing, and placing, with a sprinkling of finely 
chopped fresh mint, between slices of white bread 
spread with unsalted butter. These sandwiches 
should be put together as short a time as possible 
before serving, and, except the butter, everything 
used should be very cold. 

OLIVE AND CELERY SANDWICHES. 

Chop separately in a chopping bowl, not in a 
grinder, an equal quantity of olives stuffed with 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 123 



pimentos and tender, white celery. Mix and moisten 
with a sufficient amount of mayonnaise dressing 
to spread easily. Put between buttered bread and 
cut in rounds or triangles. 

PEANUT SANDWICHES. 

Prepare the mayonnaise dressing in the usual 
way, only making slightly thicker, adding no milk 
or cream. Hull 2 qts. of fresh peanuts, then roll 
fine, do not grind. Mix the peanuts with the dress- 
ing. Slice and butter the bread, then spread with a 
layer of peanuts and dressing, then a few slices of 
hard boiled egg. Close with another layer of bread 
and serve as other sandwiches. 

Mrs. Jacob Sell. 

SANDWICHES. 

Take equal amount of cold boiled chicken and 
cold boiled tongue, the meat of 1 doz. olives, and 
6 hard boiled eggs. Mix ingredients all together, 
and chop fine. Then work into a paste by adding 
mayonnaise dressing. Spread on buttered toast. 

Mrs. Howard Young. 

CHEESE SANDWICHES. 

Two-thirds lb. American cream cheese, one- third 
cup butter, little whipped cream, pepper to taste. 
Grind cheese in meat chopper, add butter and work 
together. Add sufficient whipped cream to thin 
enough to spread. 

Mrs. Howard Young. 



124 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



Waffles and Muffins 



4 saltspoonfuls equal 

4 teaspoonfuls equal 

2 teaspoonfuls equal 

2 dessertspoonfuls equal 

8 tablespoonfuls of liquid . equal 
6 tablespoonfuls of dry . . . equal 

2 gills _ equal 

2 cupf uls or 4 gills equal 

• 4 cupfuls of liquid equal 

4 cupfuls of flour equal 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



teaspoonful 
tablespoonful 
dessertspoonful 
tablespoonful 

gill 
gill 

cupful 
pint 
quart 
quart 



2 cupfuls of solid butter . equal 1 pound 
2 cupfuls granulated sugar equal 1 pound 
2J cupfuls powdered sugar equal 1 pound 
2 cupfuls of milk or water equal 1 pound 

1 tablespoonful of butter . . equal 1 ounce 

2 tablespoonfuls of flour . . equal 1 ounce 
2 tablespoonfuls of coffee equal 1 ounce 

Butter the size of an egg means 2 tablespoonfuls or 
2 ounces. 

A tablespoonful of melted butter is measured after 
melting. 

A tablespoonful of butter, melted, is measured before 
melting. 



In all receipts calling for baking powder, our 
friends will find it more profitable to use the Royal 
brand. This powder we all know is free from alum 
and absolutely pure. 



In all recipes calling for flavoring extracts our 
friends will find "Sauer's Flavoring Extracts" es- 
pecially satisfactory. 



BAKING POWDER. 



FLAVORING EXTRACTS. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 125 



WAFFLES. 

1 pt. of thick milk, 2 eggs, beaten separately, 
| cup of sour cream, 1 heaping teaspoonful of soda, 
salt to taste, flour enough to make a batter. Mix 
yolks of eggs, milk, cream, and soda. Let stand a 
while, then beat in the flour and the whites of eggs. 
Have iron very hot, pour batter on hot side, turn 
iron at once and bake. 

Miss Yettie Newman. 

QUICK WAFFLES. 

1 qt. sweet milk, 6 eggs, yolks and whites beaten 
separately, \ cup melted butter, 5 cups flour. Just 
before baking add 4 teaspoonfuls baking powder. 
Beat well for a few minutes. 

Mrs. S. L. Bixler. 

WAFFLES. 

4 eggs beaten separately, 1 qt. milk, piece of 
butter the size of an egg, melted, 3 teaspoonfuls 
baking powder, a little salt; flour enough to make a 
rather stiff batter. Mrs. W. F. Kintzing. 

WAFFLES. 

1 qt. of sour milk, 1 teaspoonful of soda, a pinch 
of salt; flour enough to make a stiff batter, a little 
thicker than for griddle cakes, add 1 teaspoonful 
of baking powder to the flour, stir in \ cup of melted 
butter and lard, 2 eggs, yolks and whites beaten 
separately, beat whites very stiff and add just before 
baking. Mrs. J. B. Weeks. 

• BREAD GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Soak \ cup of bread crumbs, free of crusts, in 
1 cup of milk, add 1 well beaten egg, \ teaspoonful 
salt, 1 cup flour, 1 rounded teaspoonful baking 
powder. Mix thoroughly and bake on a hot griddle. 

0. H. 



126 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



FLANNEL CAKES. 

1 tablespoonful of butter, 2 tablespoonfuls of sugar 
creamed, 2 eggs beaten separately, cups of sour 
milk, or butter milk, 1J cups of sweet milk, 1 tea- 
spoonful of soda in the sour milk, 3 cups of flour. 
Many use it for waffles by adding 1 more cup of flour. 

Minnie Hartman. 

FLANNEL CAKES. 

3 cups flour, 1 qt. sour or butter milk, J teaspoonful 
of salt, 1 teaspoonful soda, 2 eggs beaten separately. 
If milk is very sour add the full amount of soda, if 
it is freshly turned use less. Dissolve soda in a little 
of the milk, or in hot water. Some cooks use vinegar. 

Mrs. J. S. Moul. 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES. 

1 pt. of buckwheat flour, 2 large spoonfuls of 
wheat flour, 1 pt. water, § cake of yeast, 1 teaspoon- 
ful of salt, 1 tablespoonful of sugar. Let stand until 
light then add 1 heaping tablespoonful of molasses 
and 1 teaspoonful of soda, scalded in water. 

Mrs. L. H. Hoffacker. 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES. 

Rub together 1 tablespoonful of flour, 1 table- 
spoonful of molasses and \ teaspoonful of salt. Dis- 
solve 1 yeast cake in 1 pt. of luke warm water^ or 
diluted milk, add to the flour and molasses, working 
smooth. Stir in another pint of water or milk and 
water, to this add 1 qt. of buckwheat flour. In the 
morning add \ a teaspoonful of soda, thin if neces- 
sary; bake on a greased griddle. Mrs. J. S. Moul. 

GRAHAM GEMS. 

One-half pt. graham flour, \ pt. wheat flour, 2 
eggs, 1 pt. milk, a little salt. Bake in quick oven. 

Mrs. M. 0. Smith. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 127 



GRAHAM GEMS. 

1 qt. of graham flour, a little wheat flour, 1 egg, 
little salt, 2 teaspoonfuls of good baking powder, 
butter size of an egg, rub butter and graham flour 
together, add 1 qt. of sweet milk, bake in gem pans. 
Bake about 36 min. in a quick oven. Batter should 
be the consistency of puffs. 

Anna H. Eagle, 
Marietta, Pa. 

MUFFINS. 

3 cups flour, 3 tablespoonfuls butter, 2 teaspoon- 
fuls baking powder, 3 eggs beaten separately, whites 
added last. Salt to taste. Very good. 

WHEAT MUFFINS. 

2 tablespoonfuls of sugar, 1 tablespoonful butter, 
1 egg, | cup sweet milk, 1J cups flour, 2 teaspoonfuls 
baking powder. Beat whites separately. 

Mrs. Etzler. 

MINNIE HARTMAN'S MUFFINS. 

1 pt. of milk, 3 cups of sifted flour, 2 eggs, J cup 
of butter, 3 heaping teaspoonfuls baking powder, 
a pinch of salt, 1 tablespoonful of sugar. Put salt, 
sugar in 2 cups of flour, then add the mijk, then the 
butter melted, yolks of the eggs, then the last cup 
of flour with the yeast powder sifted into it, last the 
whites of the eggs beaten stiff, folded gently in. 

TWIN MOUNTAIN MUFFINS. 

One-third cup of butter, J cup sugar, J teaspoonful 
salt, 1 egg, J cup of milk, 2 cups of sifted flour, 3 
level teaspoonfuls baking powder. Cream the 
butter, add sugar gradually, then salt, add egg 
beaten light with the milk, mix with flour and baking 
powder. Bake in hot buttered gem tins about 25 
minutes. This makes just 1 doz. Mrs. H. B. Baer. 



128 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



RAG MUFFINS. 

2 cups of flour, 1 tablespoonful of shortening, 
2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, and a little salt. 
Wet with milk, roll thin and a mixture of butter and 
sugar. Roll like jelly cake, cut into slices, and bake 
on tins. Mrs. Harry Shultz. 

CORNMEAL MUFFINS. 

1| cups cornmeal, H cups flour, 2 teaspoonfuls 
baking powder, \ cup sugar, \ teaspoonful salt, 
small teaspoonful melted butter, 2 eggs, milk enough 
to make stiff batter. 

Martha M. Fisher. 
CORN MUFFINS. 

1 qt. of wheat flour, 1 cup of corn meal, 1 scant 
cup of butter, 1 cup of sugar, 4 eggs, 3 good tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder, 1 pt. of milk. Beat 
butter, sugar and yolks together, then add the other 
ingredients. Mrs. C. N. Myers. 

CORN MUFFINS. 

2 pts. of sour milk, \ pt. of water, 1 even teaspoon- 
ful of soda, 4 teaspoonfuls of melted butter, salt, 
yolks of 2 eggs, \\ pts. of corn flour, \ pt. of wheat 
flour, whites of eggs beaten and added last. 

Miss Charlotte Hauer. 

CORN MUFFINS. 

1 cup of flour, J cup of yellow corn meal, | cup 
of sugar, \ teaspoonful of salt, 2 teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder, 1 cup of sweet milk, 1 egg, 1 table- 
spoonful of melted butter. Mix dry ingredients, 
beat the egg and add milk. Add the liquid to the 
dry ingredients and beat thoroughly, put in the 
melted butter. Bake in greased pans. Good. 

Mrs. Lewis Brockley. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 129 



CUP PUFFS. 

One-half cup of white sugar, \ cup milk, 2 eggs, 
2 teaspoonfuls baking powder, and a pinch of salt; 
flour enough to make a batter that runs easily from 
a spoon. Butter 6 cups and put in tablespoonful 
of batter, layer of fruit, then batter, and steam 1 hr. 
Either canned or fresh fruit is nice. 

Mrs. A. H. Secrist. 

PUFFS. 

1 cup flour, 2 cups milk, 2 eggs. Beat eggs and 
milk together add to flour and beat smooth. Salt. 
Bake f hr. in a moderate oven. 

FILLING. — 1 egg, f cup sugar, lump of butter 
size of walnut, beat to a cream, open the puff on 
the side and put in two teaspoonfuls of cream. Eat 
warm. Mrs. Fannie V. Hostetter. 



RAISIN PUFFS. 

Cream \ cup sugar, butter size of an egg and 1 egg. 
Add 1 cup milk, 2 cups flour, 2 teaspoonfuls baking 
powder, J teaspoonful salt, and 1 cup chopped rai- 
sins. Steam \ hour in cups or two-thirds of an hour 
in a basin. 

SAUCE. — Mix | cup sugar, 1 tablespoonful 
cornstarch, pour in 1 cup boiling water and let boil 
5 min. Add 1 tablespoonful butter and juice and 
rind of small lemon. 

Mrs. J. C. Carey. 



RAISIN MUFFINS. 

1 cup sweet milk, 2 tablespoonfuls of sugar, 2 
tablespoonfuls of butter, 2 cups flour, 2 rounding 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 2 eggs, § teaspoonful 
of salt. Beat well and stir in 1 cup of seeded raisins. 
Bake in hot oven twenty-five minutes. 

Marguerite Carbaugh. 



130 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



PUFFS. 

1 cup flour, 1 cup milk, 2 eggs and a little salt. 
Heat puff irons and have hot oven. 

SAUCE. — 1 small lump butter creamed with 1 
cup sugar, add 1 egg beaten until light. Flavor with 
vanilla. Emma Jackson. 

SALLY LUNN. 

1 scant pint flour, 1 tablespoonful sugar, 1 level 
teaspoonful salt, \ cup butter and lard creamed, 
1 cup sweet milk, 2 neaping teaspoonfuls baking 
powder, 3 eggs beaten separately. Bake in pan for 
30 minutes. Blanche Hostetter. 

SALLY LUNN. 

1 cup milk, 1 cup sugar, 2 eggs, 1 tablespoonful 
butter, 3 scant cups flour, 2 teaspoonfuls baking 
powder. Bake in moderate oven 1 hour. 

Amelia Fisher. 

OATMEAL MUFFINS. 

1 lb. oatmeal, 1 lb. brown sugar, 1 cup boiling 
water, \\ cups flour, J teaspoonful soda; § cup lard. 

Sarah Dusman. 

GRAHAM MUFFINS. 

1 cup sour milk or butter milk, \ cup baking mo- 
lasses, \\ teaspoonfuls soda, \ cup lard, 1 egg, pinch 
of salt, a little wheat flour, stiffen with Graham 
flour until thickness of cake batter. 

Marguerite Carbaugh. 

POP OVERS. 

2 cups of milk, 2 cups of flour, 2 eggs. Beat the 
eggs, then add milk and flour. Have the muffin 
pans very hot. Put in mixture and bake in a quick 
oven. Mrs. George N. Forney. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 131 



CHEESE STRAWS. 

Rub 4 tablespoonfuls of sifted flour with 2 of 
butter and 4 of grated cheese. Add 1 egg and season 
with salt and cayenne pepper. Roll very thin, cut 
into narrow strips 3 in. long, and bake a pale brown. 

Mrs. Lewis Brockley. 



132 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



Puddings 



BAKED PUDDING. 

Such as bread, rice, tapioca, sago and cocoanut, 
one hour each. 

BOILED PUDDING. 

Such as Indian pudding, plum pudding and huckle- 
berry pudding, two or three hours each. 

BATTER PUDDING. 

Such as cottage, etc., about forty-five minutes. 

PHILADELPHIA PUDDING. 

Wash and core the desired number of slightly 
tart apples, but do not pare them. Place i|n bake 
dish large enough to hold apples and batter. Dot 
each apple with a bit of butter, tablespoonful of 
sugar and sprinkle cinnamon on top. Put into oven, 
bake until soft. Prepare the batter as follows: 2 
eggs, whites beaten separately. Beat 2 tablespoon- 
fuls of sugar with yolks, add 1 cup cream or use rich 
milk and a small lump of butter, then add 2 cups of 
flour, into which 2 teaspoonfuls of good baking 
powder has been sifted. Pour this over baked apples 
and put back into oven, baking until done. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

Soak 3 tablespoonfuls of tapioca in water over 
night, put this into a quart of boiling milk and boil 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 133 



half an hour. Beat the yolks of 4 eggs with a scant 
cup of sugar. Add 3 tablespoonfuls of prepared 
cocoanut; stir in and boil 10 minutes longer. Pour 
into a pudding dish, beat whites to a stiff froth, add 
3 tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar, spread on top 
and sprinkle cocoanut over all. Brown in oven. 

Mrs. J. C, Miller, 

York Road, Pa. 

APPLE TAPIOCA. 

1 cup tapioca, soak 1 hr. in water to cover, 1 tea- 
spoonful salt. Pare and core 6 apples and put in 
baking dish, fill center with sugar, add tapioca, and 
1 pt. water. Bake. M. Elizabeth Gitt. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

1 qt. of milk, 4 full tablespoonfuls of sugar, f cup 
tapioca, 3 eggs, vanilla to taste, pinch of salt. Soak 
tapioca over night in cold water. Boil milk and 
tapioca together for 5 minutes, remove from stove, 
add beaten yolks of eggs, return to stove until it 
comes to a boil, add sugar flavor with vanilla. When 
cold add beaten whites of eggs, just before serving. 

Mrs. Jacob Slagle. 
Baltimore, Md. 

RICE APPLES. 

Boil \ lb. rice until soft, add 1 qt. sweet milk, \ 
small cup of sugar. Pare and core 7 or 8 good cook- 
ing apples, place in a buttered dish, put 1 teaspoonful 
jelly into each cavity, and fill with rich cream, 
put rice in around the apples, leaving top uncovered. 
Bake 30 minutes, then cover with whites of 2 eggs 
and sifted sugar. Brown. Serve with cream. 

Mrs. D. Guy Hollinger. 

RICE PUDDING. 

2 qts. of milk, 1 teacup of rice, butter the size 
of a walnut, \ teaspoonful of salt, 4 tablespoonfuls 



134 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



of sugar. Bake in a slow oven 2 hours, stir while 
baking; flavor with nutmeg. 

Mrs. Lewis Brockley. 

RICE PUDDING. 

1 qt. milk, 3 tablespoonfuls uncooked rice, 3 
tablespoonfuls sugar, pinch of salt, lump of butter, 
and grated nutmeg for flavoring. Put in oven and 
stir when crust forms on top. Bake If hours in 
moderate oven. Mrs. E. E. Henderson. 

QUEEN OF PUDDING. 

1 qt. milk, 1 pt. bread crumbs, 4 eggs, 1 cup sugar. 
Beat the yolks of the eggs and sugar together, add 
the milk, then the bread crumbs. Pour into a pud- 
ding dish well greased with butter, and bake until 
firm. Take from oven, and cover with thin slices 
of crabapple jelly, then with an icing made of the 
whites of the eggs, and 1 cup of sugar. Put back 
into oven and let brown. 

A. K. Trone. 

BREAD PUDDING. 

1 pt. of fine bread crumbs, always stale and dry, 
3 eggs, 1 tablespoonful melted butter, nutmeg to 
taste, 1 teaspooonful baking powder. Beat yolks 
light, add 1 pt. milk, stirring well together, add 
bread crumbs with baking powder, butter and 
nutmeg, stir lightly, bake at once until done, but 
not watery, almost 20 minutes. Take from oven, 
spread with currant jelly, beat whites very stiff, 
add 1 tablespoonful sugar, spread over pudding, 
return to oven to brown lightly, eat with cream or 
any desired sauce. 

Mrs. Ella Bollinger. 

AN EXCELLENT BREAD PUDDING. 

Take 1 pt. bread crumbs, and pour over 1 qt. 
new milk, let stand until soft. Add 1 tablespoonful 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 135 



butter, and grated rind of 1 lemon, yolks of 4 eggs, 
well beaten, with 1 cup sugar. Bake in pudding dish, 
when cool spread with jelly, preserves or stewed 
fruit. Beat whites of 4 eggs with 1 tablespoonful 
pulverized sugar. Flavor with lemon, spread over 
pudding and put in oven to brown. 

Mrs. H. M. Rudisill. 

BREAD CAKE. 

1 doz. eggs, the yolks beaten with 1 lb. powdered 
sugar, | lb. bread cut in little squares, browned, then 
pounded, f lb. powdered almonds, § oz. ground 
cinnamon, J oz. ground cloves, a little rose water, 
last whites of eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Grease 
pan well and put greased paper in pan. Bake 1\ hrs. 

Mrs. Edward Reindollar, 

Taney town, Md. 

CRACKER PUDDING. 

1 cup crushed crackers, f cup sugar, 1 quart 
sweet milk, | cup cocoanut, 2 eggs (whites for icing), 
\ teaspoonful vanilla. Bake in oven. 

Mrs. B. R. Shultz. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 

1 full cup flour, 1 tablespoonful butter, \ cup 
sugar, \ cup of milk, 1 heaping teaspoonful of baking 
powder, 1 egg, and a little salt. Bake 25 minutes in 
moderate oven. 

SAUCE. — 1 cup sugar, \ cup butter, juice of 1 
lemon, 1 egg. Beat butter, sugar and egg together 
to a cream. Set it on stove in double boiler and 
heat. Pour in lemon juice and add nutmeg. Pour 
from one dish to another a few times and send to 
table. Edith Gitt Billmeyer. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 

1 cup sugar, 1 tablespoonful butter, 2 eggs, 1 cup 
sweet milk, 3 cups flour, or enough to make a right 



136 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



stiff batter. 3 small teaspoonfuls baking powder, 
1 teaspoonful salt. Serve with lemon sauce. 

Mrs. J. U. Snively. 

BAKED INDIAN PUDDING. 

Scald 1 qt. sweet milk, thicken with 1 cup corn- 
meal, 4 well beaten eggs, whites and yolks separately, 
sugar to taste, 1 cup currants, \ cup raisins, salt, 
cinnamon. Bake 2 hours; serve hot. 

SAUCE FOR PUDDING.— 1 cupful boiling 
water, 1 tablespoonful of corn starch, \ cup of 
butter, 1 cup powdered sugar, 1 egg, a little grated 
nutmeg, juice of 1 lemon. Wet the corn starch in 
cold water and stir in the boiling water and boil 
10 min. Add the lemon juice and pour the boiling 
mixture into the egg mixture until thoroughly 
blended. The egg mixture consists of the butter 
and sugar rubbed to a cream. Add the well beaten 
egg and the nutmeg. 

M. Bertha Zieber. 

BLACKBERRY MUSH. 

Mash 1 qt. of very ripe blackberries, sweeten to 
taste, cook 15 minutes, stir in flour enough to make 
them stick together. Keep boiling all the time, 
pour into cups, when cold, eat with cream. 

Mrs. A. C. Matthews. 

York, Pa. 

BLACKBERRY PUDDING. 

1 cup of butter, 2 cups of sugar, 4 eggs, 1 cup of 
milk, 1 teaspoonful of soda, flour enough to make 
it very stiff, 1 qt. of berries, bake 1 hour. Huckle- 
berries can be used instead of blackberries. 

Miss A. Kate Shriver. 

HUCKLEBERRY PUDDING. 

2 eggs, \ cup sweet milk, 1 cup sugar, \ teaspoonful 
baking powder, \ cup butter, creamed, 2 cups flour, 
1 pt. huckleberries, floured. Mrs. Hugh B. Hostetter. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 137 



HUCKLEBERRY PUDDING. 

1 cup sugar, \ cup butter, \ cup sweet milk, 2 eggs, 
1 teaspoonful baking powder in \\ cups of flour, 
and lastly a pint of berries, if preferred substitute 
raisins. Bake and serve with sauce. 

Mrs. Paul Sell. 

BAKED HUCKLEBERRY PUDDING. 

1 quart of berries, \ teaspoonful of mace or nut- 
meg, 3 eggs well beaten, separately, 2 cups of sugar, 
1 tablespoonful of butter, 1 cup of sweet milk, 1 
pint of flour, 2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Roll 
the berries well into the flour and add last of all. 
Bake \ hour in a moderate oven and serve with 
sauce. Mrs. 0. N. Anthony. 

BAKED HUCKLEBERRY PUDDING. 

1 cup of sugar, 1 cup of milk, 1 egg, 1 pt. of flour, 
1 pt. of berries, butter the size of an egg, 2 tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder. 
m SAUCE. — 5 tablespoonfuls of sugar, butter the 
size of an egg, cups of boiling water, yolk of 1 egg, 
1 heaping teaspoonful of corn starch, 1 teaspoonful 
of vanilla, 2 or 3 of good strong vinegar, and a little 
nutmeg. Cream sugar, butter and egg together. 
Mix the cornstarch with a little water and stir all 
into the 1\ cups of water. Cook a few minutes and 
serve. Mrs. W. L. Hoffheins. 

RASPBERRY PUDDING. 

Bake in loaf, 1 cup sugar, cups milk, a piece of 
butter the size of an egg, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoonful 
baking powder. Make stiff as cake batter, then stir 
in 1 pt. raspberries. Serve hot with milk or a plain 
sauce. Miss Emijy J. Young. 

RASPBERRY or STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE 

1 qt. flour, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder, 4 table- 
spoonfuls sugar, 3 tablespoonfuls butter, salt, 1 cup 



138 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



sweet milk, 1 egg. When baked split the cake with 
a sharp knife and fill with sweetened berries, replace 
top and serve with milk. Mrs. Naill. 

CHERRY PUDDING. 

1 pt. of flour, 2 tablespoonfuls of sugar, 1 teaspoon- 
ful salt, 2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 1 cup of 
milk, and 2 eggs. Stir all together until smooth, 
add 1 cup of cherries, seeded. Pour in small cups, 
greased, and steam 20 minutes. Serve with hard 
sauce, or if preferred a hot sauce. 

Mrs. Wm. Anthony. 

EGG DUMPLINGS. 

One pint flour, one and one-half teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder, two eggs and one cup of sweet milk. 

Mrs. Reuben Sprenkle. 

BOILED CHERRY DUMPLINGS. 

To 1 lb. of bread sponge, add 1 egg, J cup sugar, 
tablespoonful lard, knead well, adding a little flour. 
Let rise 2 hours, then shape into dumplings. Let 
rise 2 hours more. Have boiling 1 pt. cherries, 
\ pt. water, \ cup sugar. Drop in the dumplings 
and boil for \ hour. Do not remove lid from kettle 
while boiling. 

Mrs. Harry Naill. 

BOILED BERRY OR CHERRY PUDDING. 

1 cup of sugar, 2 \ cups of flour, 1 cup of sweet 
milk, 2 cups of berries, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoonful of bak- 
ing powder. Put into a bag and boil 2 hours. 

Mrs. H. M. Alleman. 

PEACH PUDDING. 

1 pt. of cut peaches, 1 pt. of flour, f cup sweet 
milk, 1 egg beaten light, butter the size of an egg, 
| teaspoonful salt, 1 teaspoonful baking powder. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 139 



Mix well together, then pour it over the peaches in 
a pudding dish and bake until well done. Serve 
with sugar and cream. 

Mrs. Jacob Myers. 

PEACH SHORT CAKE. 

2 cups flour, 2 tablespoonfuls butter and lard 
mixed, 2 teaspoonfuls bakijng powder, pinch salt. 
Mix together then add 1 well beaten egg, 2 table- 
spoonfuls sugar and 1 cup sweet milk. Bake in 
jelly pans. Slice peaches thin and sugar before 
using. When cool place them between the layers 
and on top. Mrs. C. E. Roop, 

Taney town, Md. 

PEACH PUDDING. 

Rub a tablespoonful of butter into a pint of sifted 
flour mixed with a teaspoonful of baking powder, 
and a pinch of salt. Pare 6 ripe peaches, cut into 
halves, and take out stones. Add one beaten egg 
to a half a cupful of milk, thicken with prepared 
flour, and pour into a buttered baking pan. Arrange 
the peaches over the top, cut side up. Put a drop 
of vanilla into each, fill with sugar and lay a bit of 
butter on the center of each. Bake in a hot oven. 
Serve hot with sweetened cream. 

Sarah Dusman. 

DRIED APRICOT PUDDING. 

1 pt. milk, 1 pt. bread crumbs, 1 pt. dried apricots, 
stewed very soft, 1 tablespoonful of butter, 2 eggs, 
1 cup of sugar; pinch of salt. Boil the milk and while 
hot turn it over the bread crumbs. Stir into this the 
butter and the stewed apricots. When cool add 
the sugar, the pinch of salt, and the egg well beaten. 
Put into a well buttered pudding dish, and bake 
half an hour. Serve with a sweet sauce. Dried 
peaches may be used in the same way. 

Mrs. Chas. Ehrehart. 



140 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



FRUIT PUDDING. 

1 pound mince meat. Boil 20 minutes in 1 pint 
water. Let cool then add: 2 well beaten eggs 1 
cup bread crumbs, browned, \ cup suet, chopped 
fine, a little citron, 1 teaspoonful vanilla. Cook or 
steam in double boiler 2 J hours. Serve with lemon 
sauce. This may be served hot or cold. 

Mrs. Emil J. Stout. 

MOONSHINE. 

1 cup of sweet cream, whites of 2 eggs, well beaten, 
2 oranges, 2 bananas cut in small pieces, stir in the 
cream, sweeten to taste. Set on ice and serve with 
whipped cream. Mrs. D. D. Ehrhart. 

APPLES STUFFED WITH NUTS. 

Core the apples. Chop very fine enough walnuts 
to fill them. Season with cinnamon and sugar. 
Bake and serve with whipped cream. 

Mks. F. M. Miller, 
New Oxford, Pa. 

APPLE FLOAT. 

1 pt. milk, 3 eggs, 1 teaspoonful of corn starch. 
Make into custard and let cool. Beat the whites 
of eggs into stiff froth, take a pint of finely chopped 
or mashed apples, beat them i nto the ( whites. 
When the custard is cool lay the beaten whites over 
the top, dot with a jelly and flavor with vanilla. 

Mrs. V. K. Jordan. 

EXCELLENT BAKED APPLES. 

Take 10 or 12 good sized juicy apples, pare and 
core. Butter a baking dish and put into it the apples, 
fill the cavities with sugar. Take a half teacup of 
butter, and a tablespoonful of flour, and rub together 
until smooth. To this put enough boiling water 
to make it thin enough to cover each apple. Bake 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 141 



in a slow oven 1 hr. or more. Can be eaten with 
meat or used as a dessert with cream. 

A. L. Alleman. 

PRUNE PUDDING. 

Beat whites of 3 eggs very stiff, add 1 cup of 
chopped prunes, sugar to taste, and a little vanilla. 
Bake 15 minutes in hot oven and eat with whipped 
cream. Prunes must be cooked, seeded, and chop- 
ped fine. Mrs. Kate W. Himes, 

New Oxford, Pa. 



PRUNE PUDDING. 

One-half pound of best prunes, \ pt. of rich cream, 
whites of 6 eggs, 6 tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar. 
Stew prunes, pour off the syrup, when fruit is cold, 
chop fine. Beat eggs to a stiff froth, add sugar and 
prunes. Bake in a buttered dish for | hour in a 
moderate oven. Cover for 20 minutes and serve 
with whipped cream. 

Mrs. Frank Conrad. 



WHORTLEBERRY PUDDING. 

One-fourth lb. butter, \ lb. sugar, 1 lb. flour, 
5 eggs, 1 teaspoonful soda dissolved in cup sour milk. 
Flour to make a good batter. Add 1 pt. or 1 qt. 
berries well floured. Bake 1 hour. 

Mrs. A. C. Matthews. 



DOLLY IN THE BLANKET. 

1 qt. flour, good pinch salt, 2 teaspoonfuls baking 
powder, 1 tablespoonful lard. Roll dough lightly 
into a sheet, spread thick with jam or plum pre- 
serves, roll up, fasten ends, and put into a floured 
bag twice the size, and drop into a pot of boiling 
water. Boil 2 hours. Mrs. J. U. Snively. 



142 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



HASTY PUDDING. 

1 pt. milk, 4 eggs, 6 spoonfuls flour. 

SAUCE. — 1 cup sugar, 1 egg, nutmeg, 1 teacupful 
boiling water, butter size of egg. Beat well together 
before adding the water. Season with juice and 
grated rind of 1 lemon. 

Mrs. G. F. Himes, 
New Oxford, Pa. 

ASH BOLTON. 

1 cup suet chopped fine, 1 cup raisins, 2 cups 
molasses, 1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, 
pinch salt, 1 teaspoonful baking powder. Flour to 
stiffen. Boil 2 hours; serve with sauce. 

Mrs. J. U. Snively. 

DARK PUDDING. 

One-half cup raisins, chopped, \ cup molasses, 
\ cup butter, \\ cups flour, \ cup sweet milk, f tea- 
spoonful cloves and 1 teaspoonful cinnamon, \ tea- 
spoonful soda. Steam \\ hrs. and serve with hard 
sauce or the following: 1 cup sugar, \ cup water, boil 
until it spins a thread. Pour this over the well 
beaten yolks of 3 eggs, add 1 cup cream and flavor 
with lemon. Mrs. Hugh B. Hostetter. 

PLUM PUDDING WITHOUT EGGS. 

1 pt. flour, \\ teaspoonfuls baking powder, 1 small 
cup of suet chopped fine, f cup brown sugar, a pinch 
of salt, \\ teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, not quite \ 
teaspoonful of cloves, a little nutmeg, 1 large cupful 
seedless raisins, J cup currants, \ cup molasses, 
1 cup milk, mixed with the molasses. Mix into a 
thick batter, steam 2 hours; serve with a hard sauce 
made with a lump of butter size of a large egg, a 
good cup of sugar creamed with the butter, and a 
small egg well beaten; flavor to taste. 

Mrs. F. W. Shuman. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 143 



LADY FINGER PUDDING. 

1 qt. sweet milk, 4 eggs, 4 tablespoonfuls of sugar, 
J tablespoonful corn starch; vanilla. Boil the milk 
in double boiler. Beat the eggs, whites and yolks 
separately. Mix a little milk with the yolks. Put 
sugar into the milk; cornstarch with a little milk 
mixed with the eggs. Mix all together and put into 
the boiling milk until it thickens. Take off the fire 
and flavor. Pour over the lady fingers. Put the 
whipped whites, sweetened, on top, and brown in 
the oven. M. Bertha Zieber. 

CREAM PUDDING. 

Stir together 1 pt. of cream, 3 oz. of sugar, the 
yolks of 3 eggs, and a little grated cocanut or nut- 
meg. Add the beaten whites, stirring lightly, then 
pour into a buttered pie plate, on which has been 
sprinkled the crumbs of stale bread to the thikcness 
of an ordinary crust. Sprinkle over the top a layer 
of bread crumbs and bake. Mrs. Samuel Althoff . 

BROWN BETTY. 

In a quart pudding dish arrange alternate layers 
of sliced tart apples, and bread crumbs, not dried, 
season each layer with bits of butter, a little sugar, 
and a pinch each of ground cinnamon and cloves. 
When the dish is full, pour over it a cupful of mo- 
lasses and water mixed. Cover the top with crumbs. 
Bake 1 hour in a medium hot oven. Serve hot with 
fairy butter. 

FAIRY BUTTER.— 1 egg, white and yolk beaten 
separately. To the yolk add juice of 1 lemon, and 
sufficient confectioners sugar to make a very thick 
paste. Last add white of egg beaten to a froth, 
and serve as cold as possible. 

Mrs. A. R. Mundorff. 

CREAM PUFFS. 

Drop 1 pt. hot water into 1 cup butter, and melt. 
Add 1 pt. sifted flour, and stir until it leaves the pan. 



144 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



Take off the stove and when cool enough not to cook 
the eggs, add 5 eggs, l at a time, and beat. Then 
drop in pans and bake in a very hot oven about 30 
minutes. 

FILLING. — 1 qt. milk, 2 tablespoonfuls of corn 
starch, sugar to taste, and 2 eggs. Make as blanc 
mange. Mrs. Charles Roop, 

Taneytown. Md. 



PUFFS. 

2 cups of flour, 4 cups of sweet milk, 4 eggs, a 
little salt. Bake in muffin rings \ hour. 

SAUCE. — A lump of butter the size of an egg, 
cream it with 1 cup of light brown sugar, beat in 1 
egg; flavor with vanilla, and pour over puffs just 
before serving. This makes 2 doz. 

Mrs. G. M. Bair. 



CREAM PUFFS. 

1 cup boiling water, \ cup of butter. Boil water 
and butter together, stir in while boiling 1 cup of 
flour. When cold add 3 unbeaten eggs, dropped one 
at a time. Drop mixture into the pan from a table- 
spoon. Bake 20 minutes in a very hot oven. 

CREAM. — 2 cups milk, 1 cup sugar, 2 eggs, 
5 scant tablespoonfuls flour. Boil as for any other 
custard. Flavor with vanilla. 

Mrs. W. B. Allewelt. 



CREAM PUFFS. 

2 cups of sugar, \ cup butter, 1 cup of sweet milk, 
3 eggs, 3 cups of flour, 3 teaspoonfuls baking powder. 
Beat eggs separately, bake in jelly cake dishes. 
This receipt may be used for cake, using chocolate 
or cocoanut. Very good. 

Mrs. Warren Hafer. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 145 



CREAM PUFFS. 

Boil together 1 cup water and \ cup butter. While 
boiling add 1 cup flour. Stir until smooth, then 
cool. Add 3 eggs, one at a time, not beaten, stir 
smooth and drop far apart on a sheet or pan. Bake 
30 minutes. 

CREAM FOR FILLING. — \ cup sugar, 2 heap- 
ing teaspoonfuls flour, 1 egg. Pour this into 1 cup 
boiling milk; flavor to taste. When cool cut puffs 
open and put in Ailing. 

Mrs. E. J. Chenoweth. 



146 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 

Pudding Sauces 



LEMON SAUCE. 

1 large cup sugar, § cup butter, 1 egg, 1 lemon 
juice, and \ rind, 1 teaspoonful nutmeg, 3 table- 
spoonfuls boiling water. Beat all together until 
light, then add hot water, and stand on stove where 
it will not boil. Serve hot. 

Mrs. J. U. Snively. 
LEMON BUTTER. 

2 lemon rinds and juice, \\ cups sugar, 2 eggs, 
beat all together. Put lump of butter in a pan, and 
boil for 5 minutes. 

Mrs. Dr. Jordy. 

HARD SAUCE. 

One- third lb. of butter, \ lb. of pulverized sugar, 
cream well together, season to taste. Stand in 
cool place. Mrs. L. H. Hoffacker. 

HARD SAUCE. 

\ cupful butter, 1 cupful sugar (pulverized), 
1 tablespoonful boiling water, 1 teaspoonful vanilla. 
Pour water over butter and cream together until 
light. Roll sugar to get lumps out, then add gradu- 
ally to creamed butter and water. Add flavoring 
last. Chopped fruit may be added but be sure to 
strain off the juice before adding fruit. 

Mrs. C. Stahr Hamm, 

Kingsport, Tenn. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 147 



CREAMY SAUCE. 

Beat 4 oz. of butter to a cream, add gradually 
8 oz. of powdered sugar. Beat again until very, 
very light, add gradually 1 gill of sweet cream, the 
grated rind of 1 lemon, and a teaspoonful of vanilla. 
Turn into a dish and stand away to harden. To be 
served with steamed, boiled, or baked batter pud- 
ding. Anna H. Eagle, 

Marietta, Pa. 

HOT COFFEE SAUCE FOR ICE CREAM. 

1 cup sugar, 1 cup strong coffe, one-third cup 
boiling water. Boil sugar and water hard for 5 min- 
utes, add coffee and boil J hour, or until syrupy. 
Serve hot with vanilla ice cream. 

Mrs. S. L. Bixler. 

CHOCOLATE DRESSING. 
V% cups sugar, \ cup water, \ cake of chocolate 
dissolved and mixed with sugar and water. 

Mrs. J. A. Melsheimer. 

HOT CHOCOLATE SAUCE FOR ICE CREAM. 

Boil together a cup of water, a half cup of sugar, 
and a few bits of cinnamon stick. Strain the syrup 
after 5 min. boiling, and stir into it a tablespoonful 
of cornstarch that has been dissolved in 3 table- 
spoonfuls of cold water, and 4 tablespoonfuls of 
grated chocolate rubbed smooth in a little water. 
Return to fire and stir while cooking until you have 
a smooth thick sauce the consistency of cream. Re^ 
move from the fire and add a tablespoonful of vanilla 
flavoring. Mrs. J. C. Tanger. 

SAUCE FOR MERINGUE. 

Two-thirds cup of milk, 4 tablespoonfuls of pow- 
dered sugar, yolks of 4 eggs, \ teaspoonful of vanilla. 
Cook in double boiler; let cool. When ready to 
serve, pour custard over the pudding. \ pt. of cream 
whipped and sweetened, makes it better, but can 
be served without. Mrs. J. P. Barnitz. 



148 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



Desserts 



PINEAPPLE DESSERT. 

1 can pineapple cut in dice, \ lb. marshmallows, 
\ pint cream. Make layer of pineapple and marsh- 
mallows until all is used and pour the whipped 
cream over this. Make 4 or 5 hours before using. 

Mrs. L. H. Hoffacker. 

FRUIT MERINGUE. 

Whites of 4 eggs, 4 tablespoonfuls powdered 
sugar, \ cup of pineapple marmalade. Beat eggs 
to a stiff dry froth, then add sugar or pineapple. 
Put this in an ungreased cake pan, and set in another 
pan of hot water. Bake in a slow oven 45 minutes. 
Take out on a platter, but do not allow a draft to 
strike it. Mrs. J. P. Barnitz. 

PRUNE WHIP. 

1 lb. prunes, cooked very soft; drain and seed, 
and chop fine. Beat whites of 3 eggs into prunes, with 
i cup sugar. Bake 20 minutes in moderate oven. 
Custard for prune whip. Cook in double boiler to 
soft custard, 1\ cups scalded milk, 1 teaspoonful of 
flour, \ cup sugar, yolks of 2 eggs well beaten. 

Mrs. William Fritz, 
Dover, N. J. 

PECAN CUSTARD. 

Grind \ lb. of pecan meats very fine, warm 1J pts. 
of milk with \ cup of the pecan meats and 3 level 
tablespoonfuls of sugar. Remove from the fire and 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 149 



flavor with \ teaspoonful of vanilla. Let this stand 
if possible for 1 hour. Beat 4 eggs slightly and add 
to the milk and nuts. Season with \ of a teaspoonful 
of salt. Bake in individual cups slowly for about 
40 minutes. When turning these out sprinkle the 
remaining ground nut meats over the top of the 
custard. Elizabeth Bowman Titzel, 

Lancaster, Pa. 

ORANGE PUDDING. 

5 oranges cut fine. Boil 1 pt. of sweet milk, add 
while boiling yolks of 3 eggs, 1 tablespoonful corn 
starch, 1 cup sugar made smooth with a little cold 
milk. Stir all the time, and when thick pour over 
fruit. Whites of 3 eggs, beaten very stiff, and 2 
tablespoonfuls sugar spread over pudding, put in 
oven to brown. Serve cold. 

Mrs. C. Anthony. 

DELICATE PUDDING. 

Into one pint of sweet milk stir \ cup granulated 
sugar, and put into double boiler. Dissolve 2 table- 
spoonfuls of cornstarch in a little cold milk, and when 
milk comes to a boil, add the cornstarch. Boil until 
it thickens. Add the beaten whites of 2 eggs, flavor 
with vanilla, pour into molds, and set to cool. When 
cold, put on ice. Serve with the following custard: 
Beat lightly the yolks of 2 eggs, add \ cup sugar, 
and 1 pt. of sweet milk. Cook in double boiler 
until it thickens. Flavor with vanilla, and set to 
cool. Mrs. 0. H. Hostetter. 



BAKED CUSTARDS. 

1 qt. of milk, let come to a boil. Stir the hot milk 
into the yolks of 6 eggs, beaten light. Add 6 table- 
spoonfuls of sugar, 1 teaspoonful of vanilla. Pour 
into molds and set molds in a pan of boiling water, 
and bake in a hot oven 20 minutes'. 

Virginia Fitz. 



150 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



FLOATING ISLAND DESSERT. 

1 qt. milk, in double boiler. Let come to a boil. 
Then add 2 tablespoonfuls of cornstarch mixed with 
a little milk and the yolks of three eggs well beaten. 
Boil well. Flavor with vanilla when nearly cold. 

FLOATER.— Beat the whites of 3 eggs to a stiff 
froth. Add 2 tablespoonfuls of granulated sugar, a 
little vanilla. Beat well. Spread on buttered pie- 
plate and place in oven until slightly browned. When 
cold cut with biscuit cutter and place on the custard. 

Mrs. A. M. Heilman. 

MARSH-MALLOW CREAM. 

Whip | pt. of cream, sweeten to taste, place on 
ice to cool. Cut in small pieces 1 orange, 2 bananas, 
5 cents worth of marsh-mallow, \ cup walnut meats. 
Beat the fruit lightly into the cream, put into 
Sherbert glasses, add a cherry for ornamentation, 
and serve at once. Mrs. CM. Wolff. 

BISQUE. 

Make a custard of 1 qt. of good milk, 3 table- 
spoonfuls of corn starch, and the yolks of 2 eggs. 
When cold add 2 qts. of rich cream and f lb. of 
macaroons dried and rolled fine. 

Mrs. J. S. Moul. 

MOCK ICE CREAM. 

Rub 1 cup of strawberry jam or preserves through 
a sieve, and add to it 1 qt. of sweet, rich cream, 
then dissolve 1 oz. of gelatine in § pt. of water, add 
J lb. of fine white sugar, stir all well together, put 
into a mold, and set on ice until firm and solid. 

Mrs. J. S. Moul. 

CHOCOLATE CUSTARD. 

4 tablespoonfuls grated chocolate, 6 tablespoonfuls 
sugar, 2 tablespoonfuls of flour, 1 teaspoonful vanilla, 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 151 



1 cup cold water, yolks of 2 eggs. Mix well and boil 
until it thickens. Use the whites of the eggs for a 
meringue on the custard. Mrs. Ed. Michael. 

CHOCOLATE CUSTARD. 

1 pt. sweet milk, 1 cup brown sugar, yolks of 3 
eggs, 2 heaping tablespoonfuls chocolate, \ cup 
flour, whites of eggs, 2 tablespoonfuls sugar, beat 
whites stiff, add sugar. Mrs. C. Anthony. 



CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

One-fourth cake of chocolate, f cup sugar, \ cup 
of water, 1 pt. of mijk, 1 tablespoonful of corn starch. 
Take chocolate, sugar and water and boil to syrup, 
then add milk and corn starch. Flavor and cool. 

Edith Gitt Billmeyer. 

ORANGE PUDDING. 

4 large oranges, reject the peel, seed, and inside 
tijssue, cut the remainder into small pieces, and put 
into 2 qt. baking dish with 1 cup sugar. Make a 
custard of 1 tablespoonful corn starch, yolks of 3 
eggs, and 1 pt. milk. Cool and add to the oranges. 
Make a meringue of whiijtes of 3 eggs and 1 table- 
spoonful sugar, spread over top, and brown ijn oven. 



PEACH A LA PARIS. 

Pare and slice peaches, arrange in a dish, dust with 
sugar, and set in a cool place. Now put into a boiler 
1 qt. of milk. Mijx 2 tablespoonfuls of gelatijne with 
cold milk, beat together 2 eggs and f cup of granu- 
lated sugar. When the milk boils stir in the eggs, 
sugar and gelatine. Set away to cool, but do not 
allow it to set. When cool pour this mixture over 
your peaches and set on ice until it jellies. Serve 
with whipped cream. 

Mrs. Clinton J. Gitt. 



152 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



WHIPPED CREAM. 

1J pts. of good rich cream, sweetened and flavored 
to taste. Whip to a stiff froth. Dissolve f oz. of 
best gelatine in 1 small teacup of hot water and when 
cool, pour into the cream. Stir thoroughly and set 
in a cool place. Mrs. Lewis Brockley.. 



CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

Yolks of 4 eggs well beaten, with \ cup of pulver- 
ized sugar, dissolve one-third of a box of gelatine in a 
cup of milk after it has stood for 10 minutes, set the 
cup of milk in a vessel of hot water on the back of 
the range, stirring frequently, and as soon as dis- 
solved remove from the range or it will curdle, and 
pour it over the beaten eggs, and sugar, flavor with 
\\ teaspoonfuls of vanilla when cool add the well 
beaten whites of 4 eggs. Let get quite cold and add 1 
qt. of cream whipped, set on ice over night. This 
will serve 12 or 14 persons. Mrs. J. D. Zouck. 



CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

1 qt. cream, whites of 5 eggs, yolks of 3 eggs, 
\ lb. pulverized sugar, \ oz. gelatine, 1 gill new milk. 
Whip cream very light, whites well beaten, beat 
yolks with the sugar, add gradually, then add 3 
teaspoonfuls vanilla. Dissolve gelatine in the milk, 
strain it into the yolks, pour the mixture into the 
cream, beating well; add whites last. Line a dish 
with sponge cake, pour mixture in to congeal. Set 
on ice. Mrs. A. C. Matthews. 



GELATINE PUDDING. 

| cup cold water, 1 pkg. gelatine (Knox), soak 15 
minutes. Scald 1 cup of milk and \ cup of sugar,; 
add this to the gelatine. When cool and begins to 
jell, add one pint of whipped cream and the whites 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 153 



of two eggs, beaten stiff. Beat all together for five 
minutes, add one cup of nuts, one can of pineapple 
(large), cup in small pieces, and a few marshmal- 
lows cut fine. Flavor with vanilla. Get all ingre- 
dients ready before soaking gelatine. 

Mrs. J. S. Moul. 



MILK JELLY. 

Heat 1 qt. of sweet milk with 1 lb. of sugar. 
When the sugar is dissolved, continue the heat at 
boiling temperature for 10 minutes. Cool the above 
mixture well, then add slowly stirring, \ oz. of gela- 
tine dissolved in a cup of water, and the juice of 3 or 
4 lemons. Set glasses containing mixture in a cold 
place that the contents may gelatinize. It is neces- 
sary to have the milk quite cool before adding the 
other ingredients, to prevent curdling. 

Mrs. Henry Shultz. 



CHOCOLATE BAVARIAN CREAM. 

Soak \ box gelatine in enough cold water to cover 
\ hr. Boil 1 pt. milk add gelatine and 2 oz. grated 
chocolate. Stir until dissolved, add \ cup sugar, 1 
teaspoonful vanilla. Pour in pan and cool until 
thickens, then add 1 pt. whipped cream, pour in 
molds desired. 

M. Elizabeth Gitt. 



SPANISH CREAM. 

\ box gelatine soaked in a good \ cup of water, 
1 pt. milk boiled, add gelatine to this, then beat 
the yolks of 4 eggs with f cup of sugar, and stir into 
the milk and gelatine. Let mixture come to the 
boiling point, stirring constantly, then pour it into 
the beaten whites of the eggs. Flavor with vanilla, 
pour into a mold, and serve cold. 

Mrs. H. N. Gitt. 



154 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



VANILLA SNOW CREAM. 

Half box gelatine dissolved in 1| pts. of warm 
water, the whites of 4 eggs, 2 teacupfuls of white 
sugar, scant teaspoonful of vanilla, beat 1 hour. 

Mrs. W. W. H. 

VANILLA SNOW. 

Mix 4 tablespoonfuls of gelatine with cold water 
and soak until soft. Add 1 teacup of boiling water, 
strain and let cool until gelatine begins to adhere 
to the sides of the vessel. Now add 1 cup of sugar, 
the beaten whites of 4 eggs, and flavor with vanilla. 
Beat until light. It may take \ hour to beat into 
stiff enough mass. Make a soft custard of the yolks 
of eggs with a pint of milk and a little corn starch. 
Put the snow on the custard when the latter is cold, 
and eat with cream. 

Mrs. Edgar Slagle. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 155 



Pastry and Pies 



PASTRY FOR ONE PIE. 

1 large cup flour, 2 tablespoonfuls of butter or 
lard, pinch of salt, \ cup cold water. 

Cora Colehouse. 

TART OR CUSTARD PASTRY. 

1 cup lard, 1 tablespoonful white sugar, white of 
1 egg, 3 tablespoonfuls of water. Mix all in flour 
quickly just stiff enough to roll. If you like nice 
pastry try this. Mrs. Elmer Wentz. 

PASTRY. 

2 cups sifted flour, two-thirds cup lard, \ cup ice- 
water, 1 teaspoonful salt. Touch the dough as 
lightly as possible. Mrs. Geo. H. Grove. 

PUFF PASTE. 

1 lb. flour, | lb. butter, 1 egg, with water. 

Mrs. Geo. H. Grove. 

MINCE MEAT. 

If lbs. of beef boiled and chopped, 2 lbs. beef 
suet chopped fine, 4 lbs. apples, 2 lbs. raisins, 2 lbs. 
currants, 2 lbs. sugar, 1 pt. grape juice, 2 nutmegs, 
\ oz. cinnamon, | oz. cloves, \ oz. mace, 1 teaspoon- 
ful salt, \ lb. citron, 2 large oranges. 

Martha M. Fisher. 



156 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



MINCE MEAT. 

3 lbs. lean meat, J lb. suet, 3 lbs. sugar, 5 lbs. 
apples, 2 lbs. raisins, 2 lbs. currants, J lb. citron, 
3 lemons, 3 nutmegs, 1 oz. mace, J pt. grape juice 
J gal. cider, All these things must be chopped, meat 
well cooked; fresh tongue is best. 

Mrs. J. H. Mackelduff. 

MINCE MEAT. 

2 lbs. of raw beef, 1 lb. of raw pork, 2 lbs. of apples, 

2 lbs. of white sugar, 1 lb. of currants, 1 lb. of raisins, 
\ lb. of citron, 1 qt. of liquor, nutmeg, cloves and 
cinnamon. Add salt to suit your taste, put in 
quart jars, and it is ready to use. 

Miss Anna Garber. 

LEMON PIE. 

1 grated lemon, 1 cup of sugar, If cups of water, 

3 tablespoonfuls of flour, 3 eggs, beat yolks, sugar, 
and flour together, then add water. Beat whites to 
a froth and put on top when baked. 

Mrs. H. W. Swartz. 

LEMON CUSTARD. 

1 grated lemon, 4 eggs, 1 pt, milk, 3 grated crack- 
ers, melted butter size of an egg. Sugar to taste. 
Bake in pastry. Miss Mary Forney. 

LEMON CUSTARD. 

Yolks of 4 eggs, 3 cups of milk, \\ tablespoonfuls 
of cornstarch, \\ cups of sugar, juice and rind of 
3 lemons, white of eggs on top and 2 tablespoonfuls 
of sugar. Mrs. E. P. Kuhn. 

LEMON MERINGUE PIE. 

\\ cups sugar, 2 small cups boiling water, 2 lemons, 
2 eggs, butter size of walnut. Grate the rind and pulp 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



157 



of lemons, add sugar, butter and well beaten yolks 
of eggs, last the boiling water. Put on stove and 
thicken with cornstarch. Make meringue of whites 
beaten stiff, add 2 tablespoonfuls pulverized sugar; 
beat well. Have ready baked a rich paste, fill with 
the cooked mixture, top with meringue, put in oven 
and brown. Mrs. Black. 

LEMON CUSTARD. 

2 lemons, 2 tablespoonfuls of corn starch, f cup 
of sugar, yolks of 4 eggs, 1 pt. of hot water. Boil all 
together. Put the whites of eggs on top after being 
whipped to a froth or you can use cornstarch to 
stiffen the whites of the eggs. 

Mrs. E. R. Barker. 

LEMON CUSTARD. 

Into a granite sauce pan put 1 qt. of sweet milk, 
with a lump of butter the size of a large walnut; 
let come to a boil. While it is cooling, grate into a 
bowl the juice and rind of 1 lemon; now beat 4 eggs 
until light with 2 tablespoonfuls of flour and f of 
a cupful of sugar. Add this to the lemon; combine 
this lemon mixture with the milk and butter; line 
2 pie plates with rich pastry, fill in the mixture, 
and bake 30 minutes in a moderate oven or until 
the custard is set. Mrs. C. M. Wolff. 

LEMON CUSTARD. 

1 cup of water, grated rind and juice of 1 lemon, 
J cup of sugar, good measure, \ tablespoonful of 
corn starch. Beat yolks of 2 eggs and mix all togeth- 
er. _ Line a pie dish with good pastry, put in- 
greidents in and crumb fine 1 piece of bread ; scatter 
over the top, and dot the pie with bits of butter 
about the size of walnut. Then bake. When baked 
take whites of 2 eggs beaten stiff with tablespoonful 
of sugar, put on top; return to oven until a light 
brown. 

Mrs. S. Spangler. 



158 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



LEMON PIE WITH TWO CRUSTS. 

Juice and grated rind of 1 small lemon, f cup of 
sugar, 1 egg, 1 teaspoonful og butter, 1 tablespoonful 
corn starch, 1 large cup of water. Beat lemon, sugar 
and egg together for ten minutes. Rub the butter 
and corn starch together. Mix thoroughly with 
other ingredients, add the water, (milk may be used 
if convenient). Stir until well mixed. Pour into 
a deep pie pan lined with paste and cover with a 
top crust. Bake quickly. 

Mrs. J. H. Bittinger. 

LEMON PIE. 

Scant cup sugar, 2 tablespoonfuls of corn starch, 
lump of butter, a cup boiling water. Mix dry in- 
gredients well then add 1 cup of boiling water. 
Boil till it thickens, then take from fire and add 
yolk of 1 (or two) eggs, using white for top. Use 
as much lemon as you like. 

Miss A. Kate Shriver. 

LEMON PIE. 

Make a crust and bake it. Take 1 cup of cold 
water, yolks of 2 eggs beaten, 1 tablespoonful of 
cornstarch mixed with 1 cup of sugar, grated rind 
and juice of 1 lemon. Cook the mixture, place in 
crust, cover with a meringue made of the beaten 
whites of the 2 eggs (sweetened), put in oven and 
brown. Mrs. C. P. Wolcott. 

LEMON TARTS. 

First part: 1 grated lemon and juice, 1 cup mo- 
lasses, 1 cup sugar, f cup of hot water. 

Second part: 1 large tablespoonful of shortening, 
one-third cup sweet milk, 2 teaspoonfuls baking 
powder, 1 egg, and enough flour to stiffen. 

Line three pie plates with pastry, then pour in the 
first part, then drop in the second part. Bake in a 
moderate oven. Mrs. Thomas Murphy. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 159 



COCOANUT CUSTARD. 

1 cocoanut grated, 1 pt. milk, 2 tablespoonfuls 
cornstarch, J cup sugar. Bake pastry, and boil 
milk, sugar, and cornstarch till thick, then remove 
from the fire and stir in the cocoanut. Place it in 
the pastry and beat the white of an egg to a stiff 
froth and place on top. Mrs. Etzler. 

COCOANUT CUSTARD. 

. 1 grated cocoanut, 6 eggs beaten well, butter 
size of an egg, 3 tablespoonfuls sugar, 1 qt. milk, 
and then add a little flour. Bake in pastry. 

Miss Mary Forney. 

COCOANUT CUSTARD. 

1J pts. sweet milk, 1 cup sugar, 2 tablespoonfuls 
of cornstarch, whites of 3 eggs, 1 cocoanut. Take 
the milk, sugar, and corn starch and \ the cocoanut; 
boil all together, then take the whites and beat 
to a stiff froth, and stir into the rest while on the 
stove. Then take it out and put it in the pie. Put 
the other half of the cocoanut on top. Bake the 
crust before the custard is in it. Mrs. J. C. Miller. 

York Road. 

PUMPKIN PIE. 

1 cup pumpkin, 1 cup sugar, 1 qt. milk, 2 eggs, 
beaten separately, lump of butter size of egg, 3 even 
tablespoonfuls flour, vanilla. Cinnamon on top. 

Mrs. J. A. Melsheimer. 

PUMPKIN CUSTARD. 

Half pint pumpkin, 2 eggs, 1 tablespoonful flour, 
cup brown sugar, J teaspoonful ginger, same of 
nutmeg, a lump of melted butter. Mix all with 
pint of milk and sprinkle cinnamon on top. 

Mrs. W. F. Sheeley, 
New Oxford, Pa 



160 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



PUMPKIN PIE. 

cup of boiled pumpkin, 1 cup of sugar, 1 table- 
spoonful flour, 2 eggs (beat the whites separately), 

1 quart of sweet milk, small lump of butter. This 
makes 4 pies. Mrs. Bertha L. Wise. 

PUMPKIN CUSTARD PIE. 

2 cups of stewed pumpkin, J nutmeg grated, 2 
level tablespoonfuls of flour, 1 cup of sugar, 1 table- 
spoonful of melted butter, 4 eggs beaten separately, 
whites added last; 1 qt. of milk. Line pie pans with 
rich pastry, fill them with the above mixture, and 
bake the custards in a slow oven for 1 hour. 

Mrs. A. C. Welsh. 

PUMPKIN CUSTARD. 

1\ cups of pumpkin, \ cup of sugar, 1 cup of milk, 

2 eggs, 2 tablespoonfuls of molasses, 2 tablespoonfuls 
of melted butter, \ tablespoonful of ginger, 1 tea- 
spoonful of cinnamon, \ scant teaspoonful of salt. 

Mrs. Wertz. 

PUMPKIN PIE. 

3 tablespoonfuls of butter, 2 cups of sugar, beaten 
together, 3 eggs, 3 cups of stewed pumpkin, 1 cup 
of cream, nutmeg, cinnamon and salt to taste. 
Bake in puff paste. Mrs. Aaron Hostetter. 

SWEET POTATO PIE. 

1 lb. boiled sweet potatoes, finely mashed, 2 cups 
of sugar, 1 cup cream, \ cup of butter, 3 well beaten 
eggs. Flavor with lemon or nutmeg, and bake in 
an under pastry shell. 

A. Kate Shriver. 

SWEET POTATO PIE. 

Boil 4 large potatoes, then mash them fine, add 
1 teaspoonful of salt, a lump of butter the size of an 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 161 



egg, add 4 eggs beaten light, with sweet milk enough 
to make custard. Sweeten to taste and bake the 
same as pumpkin custard. 

Mrs. Jacob Myers. 

CREAM PIE. 

1J cupfuls of cream, 1 cupful of sugar, 1 table- 
spoonful of flour, 1 teaspoonful of vanilla, whites of 
3 eggs. Stir thoroughly the flour into the sugar 
then pour the cream upon the sugar. Let stand 
until the whites of eggs have been beaten to a stiff 
froth. Add thijs to the cream and beat well. Add 
the vanilla and bake without an upper crust. 

Mrs. C. E. Ehrehart. 

CREAM PIE. 

4 eggs, 2 cups of sugar, 2 cups flour, 2 teaspoonfuls 
cream tartar, 1 teaspoonful soda dissolved in 2 table- 
spoonfuls sweet cream. Sift cream taratr with flour, 
add soda last; bake in cake tin. When cool split 
and spread with custard composed of yolks of 2 eggs, 
\ cup sugar, 1 pt. sweet milk; boil gently until it 
thickens, flavor to taste. Sprinkle top with pul- 
verized sugar. Mrs. McC. Davidson. 

CHOCOLATE PIE. 

\ cup chocolate, 1 cup hot water, butter the size 
of an egg, 1 cup sugar, yolks of 2 eggs, 2 tablespoon- 
fuls cornstarch. Mix all together, adding the hot 
water last. Then put on stove and thicken. Spread 
on baked crusts. Use the beaten whites of 2 eggs 
and 2 tablespoonfuls powdered sugar for the top. 
Put into the oven to set the meringue. 

Mrs. Geo. H. Grove. 

CHOCOLATE CUSTARD. 

1 pt. sweet milk, J cup sugar, yolks of 3 eggs, \ 
cup flour, 3 tablespoonfuls chocolate. Boil all 
together, put in a baked crust with the whites beaten 



162 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



stiff with H tablespoonfuls sugar on top. Set in 
oven to brown. Mrs. L. B. Spreknle. 

CHOCOLATE TART. 

1| cups of sugar, 6 egg yolks beaten well together; 
1 teaspoonful each of cinnamon, cloves and all- 
spice, i lb. of chocolate (melted), J lb. of almonds 
(blanched and cut fine), juice of 1 lemon, 1 tea- 
spoonful of baking powder, and the stiff beaten 
whites of the eggs. 

Mrs. David Greenebaum. 

AMBROSIA CUSTARD. 

Juice and rind of 2 lemons, yolks of 4 eggs, 2 cups 
of sugar, 1 cup of milk, 2 teaspoonfuls of cornstarch. 
Bake with lower crust. For meringue beat the whites 
of the 4 eggs with 6 tablespoonfuls of sugar. 

Mrs. T. J. Little. 

EGG CUSTARD PIE. 

2 eggs, 1 pt. sweet milk, 2 tablespoonfuls sugar, 
1J tablespoonfuls flour, flavor to taste. Line dishes 
with pastry and pour in the custard. 

Mrs. A. L. Benford. 

OLD FASHIONED EGG CUSTARD PIE. 

5 eggs, 1 qt. good rich milk, 3 heaped tablespoon- 
fuls sugar, § teaspoonful flour. Beat sugar and eggs 
until very light, then fill the crusts and bake in a 
moderate oven. This portion will make 2 good 
sized custards. 

Mrs. John A. Cremer. 

CRUMB PIE. 

1 cup of brown sugar, \ cup of butter, \ cup of 
sweet milk, 1 teaspoonful of soda, 2J cups of flour, 
Mix dry ingredients together, taking out 1 cup of 
crumbs for top, then add milk. This will make two 
pies. Mrs. Ruth Bender. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 163 



SUGAR CRUMB PIE. 

2 cups of flour, 1| cups of white sugar, f cup butter 
and lard. Rub well together, take out 1 cupful. 
Mix the rest of the crumbs with § cup sweet milk, 
2 a eggs, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder. Flavor 
with nutmeg. Put the cupful of crumbs on top. 

Mrs. B. R. Shultz. 

CRUMB PIE. 

1 cup of molasses, 1 cup of boiling water, 1 egg, 
1 teaspoonful of soda, 1 teaspoonful of cream tartar. 
Stir all together; divide in 3 dishes. 

FOR CRUMBS.— 1 cup of sugar, 2J cups of flour 
\ cup of lard. Strew a little cinnamon and cloves 
on before the crumbs. 

Mrs. H. W. Swartz. 

MONTGOMERY PIE. 

1 lemon, 1 cup each of sugar, molasses, and water, 
1 egg, 1 tablespoonful cornstarch. Mix all together, 
divide into 4 dishes, with under crust. Then mix 
1J cups sugar, 4 cups flour, \ cup butter, 1 cup thick 
milk, 1 teaspoonful soda, 1 teaspoonful cream tartar; 
divide this on top of each of the 4 pies. 

Mrs. W. C. Stick. 

MOCK CHERRY PIE. 

| cup of cranberries. Halve and wash so seeds 
will come out, | cup of raisins, 1 cup of sugar, 1 
tablespoonful of flour mixed with the sugar, 1 cup 
of boiling water, and 1 teaspoonful of vanilla. Cook 
until it thickens, and use as the filling for a two- 
crust pie. Mrs. C. P. Wolcott. 

APPLE CUSTARD. 

Take 1 pt. apple sauce, sweeten to taste, mix with 
it 2 eggs well beaten. Flavor with cinnamon and 
nutmeg. Bake in pastry. Miss Mary Forney. 



164 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



PINEAPPLE CUSTARD. 

1 can of pineapples cut fine, 2 cups sugar, small, 
2 cups sweet milk, 4 eggs, 1 tablespoonful of melted 
butter. Beat eggs well, then mix in the melted 
butter and the milk, pineapple, and last the juice 
from the canned fruit. Bake immediately in a 
moderate oven in a rich pastry. If fresh pineapple 
they must be boiled first. Makes 2 custards. 

Sallie R. Winebrenner. 

JELLY PIE. 

Crumbs. — 2\ cups flour, 1\ cups sugar, \ cup lard. 

Jelly. — 1 cup table-syrup, 1 cup hot water, 1 
teaspoonful soda, juice of 1 lemon. 

Line 3 pie plates with pastry, divide the jelly in 
the 3, then divide the crumbs on top of each. 

Mrs. M. H. Rudisill. 

CARROT CUSTARD. 

1 small cup boiled carrots, add 1 egg, \ cup sugar, 
2 tablespoonfuls flour, pinch salt, 1 pt. of milk, 
teaspoonful cinnamon, and nutmeg to taste. 

Mrs. Haverstock. 

CHEESE CUSTARD. 

1 pt. cheese, 3 eggs, 3 tablespoonfuls sugar, 1 
tablespoonful flour. Cover pan with pastry, beat 
eggs, sugar, and flour together, add cheese; pour 
in pastry and bake in quick oven. 

Mrs. Charles Althoff . 

BUTTER SCOTCH PIE. 

Part One. — Yolk of 1 egg, 1 heaping tablespoonful 
of flour, 1 cup of milk. Mix well. 

Part Two. — Take piece of butter size of walnut, 
let melt and fry in skillet. Into this put f cup of 
brown sugar and 4 tablespoonfuls of milk. Let cool 
5 minutes. Then pour in part one and cook slowly 
until thick. Fill into baked crust. Grind or chop 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 165 



fine nuts and sprinkle on top, then beat white of 
egg and a little sugar stiff and put on top and brown. 
Very fine. 

BUTTER SCOTCH PIE. 

Boil 1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, 2 table- 
spoonfuls butter, 2 tablespoonfuls flour, yolks of 
2 eggs. Boil until thick, after which add vanilla to 
taste. Have ready two baked crusts, and fill. Use 
the beaten whites of 2 eggs and 2 tablespoonfuls 
pulverized sugar for top. Set in oven to brown. 

Mrs. B. R. Shultz. 

BUTTER SCOTCH PIE. 

2 cups brown sugar, 3 tablespoonfuls of butter, 3 
tablespoonfuls flour, yolks of 3 eggs, 2 cups of hot 
water. Boil until thick. Have your baked pastry 
ready. Beat the whites of 3 eggs, 2 tablespoonfuls 
pulverized sugar. Spread over top. Put in oven 
until set. Mrs. Charles E. Etzler. 

CARMEL PIE. 

f cup granulated sugar, dissolved in sauce pan. 
Add to this 1 pint milk. Stir until smooth. Yolks 
of 2 eggs beaten light with 1 tablespoonful corn 
starch, 1 teaspoonful vanilla. Add this to the brown- 
ed sugar and let cook until thick. Put in pastry. 
Have ready the whites of the eggs beaten light with 
about 2 tablespoonfuls sugar. Put on as a merin- 
gue. Put in stove to brown. Pastry should be 
baked first. Mrs. L. H. Hoffacker. 

CINNAMON PIE. 

4 eggs, 2 cups sugar, 1 pint of milk, 1 cup of but- 
ter, 3 tablespoonfuls cinnamon, 2 tablespoonfuls 
cornstarch or flour. Melt butter and sugar to- 
gether, beat yolks of eggs and cinnamon and corn- 
starch with milk. Put all together and let boil 
well. Then put in crust with the whites well beaten 



166 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



on top. Put in the oven and let brown a little. 
This will make 2 good sized pies. 

Mrs. Charles E. Royer, 

Westminster, Md. 

LEMON RHUBARB PIE. 

Take one cup of stewed rhubarb, add to it the 
yolks of 2 eggs, piece of butter size of a walnut, 1 
cup of sugar in which has been mixed 1 tablespoon- 
ful of flour. Cook in a double boiler until thick 
like custard, put into a baked crust, and cover with 
a meringue made of the beaten whites of the 2 
eggs (sweetened). Put in oven and brown. 

Mrs. C. P. Wolcott. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 167 



Icings and Cake Fillings 



BUTTER ICING. 

1 lb. pulverized sugar, 2 tablespoonfuls of melted 
butter, sweet cream sufficient to thin to the desired 
consistency. Flavor. Mrs. Jacob Trone. 



CREAM CHOCOLATE ICING. 

Boil 2 cups of sugar with \ cup of sweet milk 7 
minutes, then beat until it begins to thicken. Spread 
cream over cake, then cover with the dissolved 
chocolate. Mrs. Jacob Trone. 



COLD CHOCOLATE ICING. 

1 egg beaten very light, add enough pulverized 
sugar to stiffen, | cake chocolate, and butter the 
size of a hickorynut. Melt butter with chocolate, 
then stir in the already beaten egg and sugar. 

Mrs. A. R. Brodbeck. 



CHOCOLATE ICING. 

2 cups brown sugar, one-third cake chocolate, 
piece of butter size of walnut, \ cup water. Boil 
until it hardens in cold water, beat and add § tea- 
spoonful of vanilla. 

Mrs. Unger. 



168 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



CHOCOLATE FILLING. 

One-fourth cake chocolate grated, \ cup milk, 
yolk 1 egg, 1 cup sugar, 1 teaspoonful vanilla. Boil 
sugar, chocolate, and milk till thickened, add egg 
yolk; cook 2 min. Take from fire and add vanilla. 

Mrs. Luther Haverstick. 



FILLING FOR CAKE. 

Boil 3 cups of powdered sugar and f cup of water 
till it spins a thread. Stir the boiling syrup into 4 
whole eggs beaten together. Mix with 2 cups of 
chopped raisins and 2 cups of chopped and blanched 
almonds. Flavor with vanilla and spread between 
the layers. Finally make a white frosting and spread 
over the whole cake. Half this receipt makes a fair 
sized cake. 

ICING. 

1 cup very thick sour cream, \ cup sugar, 1 cup 
finely chopped hickorynuts, whites of 3 eggs well 
beaten, flavor with vanilla, spread each layer, put 
a few dozen whole kernels on top. 

Mrs. W. S. Alleman. 



MARSHMALLOW ICING. 

2 tablespoonfuls of gelatine dissolved in 8 table- 
spoonfuls of water, 2 cups pulverized sugar, beat 
until stiff enough to spread on cake. 

Mrs. A. R. Brodbeck. 

CAKE ICING. 

Whites 3 eggs, 3 cups sugar, pour \ pt. boiling 
water on sugar, and boil until almost candied. Beat 
whites and pour into the sugar, then beat to a stiff 
cream. Flavor to taste. 

Mrs. A. C. Matthews. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 169 

CHOCOLATE ICING. 

1\ cupfuls granulated sugar, \ cupful milk, 1 
tablespoonful butter, f cake chocolate, vanilla. Boil 
until a soft ball can be formed in cold water. Beat 
well. Ada Basehoar. 

CARAMEL ICING. 

1\ cupfuls brown sugar (light), \ cupful milk, 
2 oz. butter, vanilla. Boil about five minutes or 
until a soft ball can be formed in cold water. Beat 
well. Ada Basehoar. 

MARSHMALLOW ICING. 

\ pack of gelatine, soaked in 8 tablespoonfuls of 
water, 2 cups granulated sugar mixed with 8 table- 
spoonfuls of water; put all together and beat until 
very stiff. 

Mrs. Edw. F. Redding. 



170 HNAOVER COOK BOOK. 

Large and Small Cakes 



TABLE FOR BAKING. 

Ginger bread 20 to 30 minutes 

Brown Bread, steamed ... .3 hours. 

Sponge Cake 45 to 60 minutes 

Plain Cake 30 to 40 

Fruit Cake 2 to 3 hours 

Cookies 10 to 15 minutes 

Thin Cakes, usually 20 minutes 



HOUSEHOLD HINTS. 

In using butter to grease baking tins be sure both 
are cold. Otherwise the cake will stick. 

Novices in baking often make the blunder of 
melting, or at least warming butter and plate or 
mold, before pouring in the batter. 

BAKING POWDER. 

In all recipes calling for baking powder, our 
friends will find it more profitable to use the Royal 
brand. This powder we all know is free from alum 
and absolutely pure. 

FLAVORING EXTRACTS. 

In all recipes calling for flavoring extracts our 
friends will find "Sauer's Flavoring Extracts" es- 
pecially satisfactory. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 171 



SPICE CAKE. 

1 lb. brown sugar, f lb. sifted flour, f cupful but- 
ter, 1 cup thick milk, 3 eggs, 1 teaspoonful soda, 
1 J teaspoonfuls nutmeg, 1J teaspoonfuls cloves, 2 
teaspoonfuls cinnamon. 

ICING. — 1 lb. pulverized sugar, 2 tablespoonfuls 
of melted butter. Cream sugar and butter, add 
sweet cream sufficient to thin to the desired con- 
sistency. Flavor. 

Naomi C. Wierman. 
SPICE CAKE. 

2 cups brown sugar, 2 cups flour (sifted), 1 cup 
sour milk, 4 eggs, \ cup butter, 1 teaspoonful cin- 
namon, \ teaspoonful cloves, \ teaspoonful ginger, 
1 teaspoonful soda dissolved in \ teaspoonful of 
vinegar, beat butter to cream, add sugar and eggs; 
mix well, add flour, milk, spices, then add soda. 

Mrs. Paul E. Werner. 

SPICE CAKE. 

2 cups of brown sugar, 4 eggs, 1 cup of butter and 
lard, 1 cup of thick milk, \\ teaspoonfuls of soda, 
2 \ cups of flour, 1 teaspoonful of cinnamon, \ tea- 
spoonful of cloves. Mrs. 0. N. Anthony. 

SPICE CAKE. 

\\ cups sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, butter the size 
of a walnut, 1 egg, 1 pt. of flour, 2 \ teaspoonfuls 
soda, and \ teaspoonful of each kind of spice used. 

Mrs. E. P. Kuhn. 

SPICE CAKE. 

4 eggs, leaving out the whites of 2, 2 cups brown 
sugar, | cup melted butter, \ cup sour milk, 1 tea- 
spoonful soda, 2 teaspoonfuls cinnamon, \\ tea- 
spoonfuls cloves, \ teaspoonful nutmeg, 2J cups 
flour, dissolve soda in milk. Mrs. Sharon Smith. 



172 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



APPLE SAUCE CAKE. 

Cream together \ cup of butter, 1 cup of sugar and 
1 cup of apple sauce into which 2 teaspoonfuls of 
soda have been stirred. Add 1 cup of raisins, 1 
teaspoonful each of cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg, 
\ cup of broken walnut meats, If cups of flour, and 
1 egg. Mrs. David Greenebaum. 

MISS MARY GROVE'S ALMOND CAKE. 

1 lb. of granulated sugar, \ lb. of flour, whites 
of 6 eggs beaten stiff, 1 heaping cup powdered 
almonds, drop in buttered tins, bake a light fbrown. 

ALMOND CAKE. 

4 eggs, 2 cups sugar, f cup butter, 1 cup sweet 
milk, 3 cups flour, 2 large teaspoonfuls baking 
powder. 

FILLING. — 1 cup sour cream, 1 egg, \ lb. blanch- 
ed almonds, chopped fine, 1 tablespoonful sugar 
vanilla flavoring. Mrs. Geo. H. Grove. 

ALMOND CAKE. 

1 lb. of pulverized sugar, 1 small cup of butter, 
1 cup of sweet milk, 3 cups of flour, 3 teaspoonfuls 
of baking powder, sifted in flour 3 times. Beat 
the whites of 8 eggs stiff, add last and if liked a few 
drops of almond flavor. Bake in layers. 

FILLING FOR CAKE.— J cup of good sweet 
cream, mix in enough pulverized sugar to make a 
paste to spread. Then take \ lb. of blanched al- 
monds, chopped fine, add to the filling. You can 
keep part of the almonds out, split them and deco- 
rate cake on top. Mrs. S. Spangler. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Mix 3 cups sugar (2 brown and 1 white, or all 
brown), 1 cup butter and lard, then add 1 cup sour 
milk or buttermilk; mix 1 cup cocoa dissolved in 1 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 173 



cup boiling water, 1 teaspoonful soda, mix with hot 
water and cocoa. Mix all together well, then add 
3f cups flour sifted with 2 teaspoonfuls baking pow- 
der. Vanilla to taste. 2 eggs well beaten added 
last. Bake in hot oven. 

Mrs. Wm. H. Snyder. 
CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

1 cup brown sugar, 2 cups sifted flour, 4 eggs, J 
cup butter, J cup of sour milk, 1 teaspoonful baking 
powder in flour, 1 teaspoonful soda dissolved in 
\ teaspoonful vinegar. Add this to \ cup sweet 
milk, | cup chocolate, 1 cup brown sugar. Heat 
chocolate, sugar, milk enough to melt chocolate. 

Mrs. Paul E. Werner. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

4 small cups of brown sugar, 1 small cup of butter, 
3 eggs, 1 cup of sour milk, 1 teaspoonful soda, 3f 
cups of flour after it is sifted, 1 teaspoonful of va- 
nilla, 1 cup of chocolate dissolved in 1 cup of boiling 
water. Bake in moderate oven. 

Mrs. J. B. Weeks. 

LOAF CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

\\ cups sugar, \ cup butter, 1 teaspoonful soda 
dissolved in milk, 4 heaping teaspoonfuls grated 
chocolate, \ cup sour milk, 2 eggs, 2 cups flour, 
1 teaspoonful vanilla. Pour over chocolate scant 
\ cup boiling water. 

Mrs. S. L. Bixler. 
CREAM CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

2 cupfuls sugar, 1 cup of butter, whites of 5 eggs, 
1 cup sweet milk, 3 cups flour and 2 teaspoonfuls 
of baking powder. Beat whites of eggs to a stiff 
froth and stir in last. Make boiled icing, spread 
on cake, then melt chocolate and spread on top. 

Mrs. Wm. Anthony. 



174 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



CREAM CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

One-third cup of butter, 1 cup of sugar, \ cup of 
sweet milk, If cups of flour, \ teaspoonful of baking 
powder, whites of 3 eggs, two-thirds teaspoonful 
of vanilla. Cream butter, add gradually the sugar 
and vanilla. Beat the egg whites to a stiff froth 
and add them. Sift the flour and baking powder 
together and add alternately with the milk. Cover 
with a boiled frosting made of 1 cup of sugar, \ cup 
of water, and beaten whites of 2 eggs, flavor with 
vanilla. Coat this icing with melted chocolate. 

Mrs. Wm. Overbaugh. 

CREAM CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

2 cups of sugar, 4 tablespoonfuls of butter, 4 eggs, 
beaten separately, 1 cup of sweet milk, 3 cups of 
flour, 2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 

ICING — 1 cup of sugar, and \ cup of water boiled 
till it spins a thread. Stir this syrup slowly into the 
beaten white of 1 egg. Ice cake and then coat with 
melted chocolate. Mrs. W. S. Hoffman. 

COCOA CAKE. 

3 egg yolks, 1 cup of sugar, 3 tablespoonfuls of 
cocoa, 1 cup of flour, 1 teaspoonful of baking pow- 
der, beaten whites of eggs, and 1 teaspoonful of 
vanilla. 

COCOA ICING.— 3 tablespoonfuls of cocoa, 2 
tablespoonfuls of sugar (xxxx), small lump of but- 
ter, and 2 tablespoonfuls of hot coffee. 

Mrs. David Greenebaum. 

CREAM SPONGE. 

Take 8 eggs and sugar to balance them, then 
balance 4 eggs with flour. Separate the eggs and 
stand whites out to cool. Grate a lemon, keeping 
| for dough and the other § for on top. Beat the 
yolks until light, add sugar and beat, next flour 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 175 



and lemon. Beat the whites and stir in. Bake in 
a quick oven in 3 pans. 

FILLING. — Let \ pt. milk come to a boil and add 
\\ tablespoonfuls of sugar, 1 tablespoonful corn 
starch, 1 egg, dampen with milk, stir in boiling milk, 
spread on 2 lower layers, take the other \ of lemon, 
sweeten and put on the top layer. 

Mrs. D. Guy Hollinger. 



COFFEE FRUIT CAKE. 

Beat \ lb. of butter to a cream, add 1 cup of brown 
sugar, dissolve a teaspoonful of baking powder in 
2 tablespoonfuls of molasses, add this to the sugar 
mixture, then add 1 teaspoonful allspice, 1 egg well 
beaten, 1 tablespoonful of cinnamon, 1 grated nut- 
meg. Mix \ lb. cleaned currants, (measure 3 cups) 
take sufficient flour, flour the fruit, add \ pt. of 
warm coffee to the sugar mixture, then add the flour, 
beat until smooth, add the fruit, pour into well 
greased pans and bake slowly for 2 or 3 hours in a 
moderate oven. Mrs. J. Wm. Doxey. 



COFFEE CAKE. 

4 eggs, 2 cups brown sugar, 1 cup Orleans mo- 
lasses, 1 cup butter, 1 cup strong cold coffee, 5 
cups flour, 1 cup each raisins and citron, 1 teaspoon- 
ful of cinnamon, 1 teaspoonful of ground cloves, 
i of a nutmeg, a rounding teaspoonful of soda, 
same of baking powder, dredge fruit with flour, 
bake 1 hour. This makes 1 large cake, and improves 
with age. Mrs. D. A. Frommeyer. 

COCOANUT LOAF CAKE. 

1 cup butter, 3 cups sugar, 4 cups flour, 1 cup 
sweet mijk, 3 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, whites 
of 6 eggs, 1 grated cocoanut; cocoanut must be dried 
before using. 

Miss Sallie Winebrenner. 



176 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



COCOANUT CAKE. 

4 eggs, 2 cups of sugar, beat till light; 1 cup of 
sweet milk, \ cup of butter and lard, 4 teaspoonfuls 
of baking powder, pinch of salt, 2\ cups of flour. 
This will make 3 nice layers. 

Mrs. Mary M. Wise. 



COCOANUT CAKE. 

3 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 5 eggs beaten separate- 
ly, 1 cup sweet milk, 4 cups flour, 3 teaspoonfuls 
baking powder, \ grated cocoanut, flavor with rose 
water. Bake in layers. 

FILLING— Whites of 2 eggs, and 12 even table- 
spoonfuls of granulated sugar beaten light, flavor 
with vanilla, spread and sprinkle the remaining half 
cocoanut on each layer. 

Mrs. J. H. Fleming. 



COCOANUT CAKE. 

2 cups pulverized sugar, \ cup butter and lard 
mixed, 3 eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately, 
1 cup sweet milk, 3 cups flour, 2 teaspoonfuls cream 
tartar, 1 teaspoonful soda, flavor with vanilla. 
Bake in 3 layers. 

FILLING. — 1 grated cocoanut, to half of this add 
the beaten whites of 2 eggs, and 1 cup pulverized 
sugar, for between the layers; and for the top take 
the other half mixed with 4 tablespoonfuls sugar. 

Mrs. C. Sebright. 



DEVIL CAKE, LOAF. 

1 cup white sugar, 1 cup brown sugar, 3 oz. butter, 
2 eggs, 2J cups flour, \ cup thick milk, and 1 small 
teaspoonful soda, dissolved in milk, \ cake chocolate 
dissolved in f cup boiling water. 

Mrs. E. R. Schmuck. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 177 



DEVIL CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, creamed, 2 cups brown sugar, 

1 cup sour milk, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoonful soda, yolks 
of eggs beaten, J cake chocolate melted, 2 cups flour, 
whites of eggs beaten stiff and put in last. 

ICING. — Pulverized sugar and sweet cream. 

Mrs. Martin Moul. 

DEVIL LOAF. 

1 cup brown sugar, \ cup chocolate, grated, yolk 
of 1 egg, \ cup sweet milk, 1 teaspoonful vanilla. 
Boil and set off to cool. 1 cup brown sugar, 2 eggs, 
and white of first egg, § cup sweet milk, \ cup butter, 

2 cups flour, 1 level teaspoonful soda. Cream yolks, 
sugar and butter, then add milk and flour, then the 
boiled custard and the beaten whites. Dissolve the 
soda in a little hot water and add the last thing. 
Bake in sponge cake dish. 

Mrs. J. C. Carey. 
DEVIL CAKE. 

1 cup brown sugar, f cake chocolate, f cup sweet 
milk, dissolve this on the fire. 1 cup brown sugar, 
2 eggs, \ cup butter, f cup thick milk, 2 teaspoonfuls 
soda, 2| cups flour. Mix sugar, eggs, and butter 
together, then add the first mixture, and then the 
milk, soda, and flour. Ice with 

SEA FOAM ICING.— Boil \\ cup of white sugar 
with \ cup water very slowly until when dropped 
in water it forms a soft ball; beat the whites of 2 
eggs until dry and po*ur the sugar on very slowly. 
Beat until cold and stiff. 

Mrs. Arno M. Pfaff. 
DEVIL CAKE. 

First Part. — 1 cup brown sugar, 2 cups flour, \ 
cup thick milk, 1 teaspoonful soda, \ cup butter, 
yolks of 2 eggs, 1 teaspoonful vanilla. 

Second Part. — -1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup thick 



178 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



milk, 3 tablespoonfuls cocoa, Mix well and add to 
first part. Bake in moderate oven. Shellbark 
kernels improve this cake. Ice with a chocolate 
icing. Mrs. E. K. Eichelberger. 

DEVIL CAKE, LAYER. 

2 cups of very dark brown sugar, J cup each of 
butter, sour milk, and hot water, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoonful 
of soda dissolved in a small portion of the hot water, 
one- third cake of unsweetened chocolate, grated 
and dissolved in the hot water, 2 cups of flour. 
Bake in jelly tins. 

FILLING. — 2 cups of dark brown sugar, two- 
thirds cup of sweet cream, butter the size of an egg. 
Boil till mixture drops quite thick from spoon, 
then add 1 large teaspoonful of vanilla. Beat till 
filling gets light in color. 

Mrs. 0. T. Everhart. 
DEVIL CAKE, LAYER. 

1 cup brown sugar, \ cup butter, yolks 3 eggs, 
§ cup sour milk, 1 teaspoonful soda, 2 cups flour, 
flavor with vanilla, \ cup sweet milk, 1 cup brown 
sugar, \ cake chocolate, let come to a boil. When 
cold stir in first part. 

MIDNIGHT CAKE. 

\ cup butter, 2 cups brown sugar, 2 eggs, \ cup 
boiling water, 1 teaspoonful soda, \ cake chocolate, 
| cup boiling water, 2\ cups flour, vanilla. 

Mrs. Cora Weaver, 
Littlestown, Pa. 

MID-NIGHT CAKE. 

2 cups brown sugar, \ cup shortening, 2 eggs, 2 
cups flour, 1 level teaspoonful of soda dissolved in 
J cup of thick milk, 2 oz. melted chocolate, 1 cup 
of hot coffee, 1 teaspoonful of vanilla. Beat sugar, 
butter and eggs together, add melted chocolate and 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 179 



coffee. Let cool, mix flour and last add milk and 
soda. Very fine. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

1 lb. sugar, 1 lb. flour, f lb. butter, 8 eggs, 2 lbs. 
raisins, 1 lb. currants, \ lb. citron, \ pt. grape juice, 
1 tablespoonful cinnamon, 1 teaspoonful allspice, 
1 tablespoonful cloves, and 2 nutmegs. 

Mrs. S. E. Trone. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

1 lb. sugar, 1 lb. butter, 1 lb. flour, 1 lb. currants, 
1 lb. citron, 10 eggs, 2 lbs. seedless raisins, 1 lb. 
seeded raisins, 2 teaspoonfuls mace, 2 teaspoonfuls 
cinnamon, \ teaspoonful baking powder, 2 wine 
glasses grape juice, 1 nutmeg. 

Harriet S. Hoke. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

1 lb. flour, 1 lb. sugar, 1 lb. butter, 3 lbs. raisins, 
1 lb. figs, 1 lb. citron, \ lb. almonds, broken, 10 eggs, 
1 tablespoonful ginger, 1 tablespoonful allspice, 1 
tablespoonful cinnamon, 1 teaspoonful cloves, 1 
teaspoonful mace, 1 grated nutmeg. Beat eggs 
separately. # Cream butter and sugar. Mix sifted 
flour and spices. Bake in moderate oven. This will 
make 1 very large cake or 2 medium sized cakes. 

Mrs. Hanson Robinson. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

1 cup sugar, 2 cups molasses, 4 eggs, 1 cup butter, 
1 cup thick milk, 2 teaspoonfuls soda, 6 cups flour, 
1 lb. raisins, 1 lb. currants, a little citron. # Take an 
extra quantity of flour to rub fruit in; spice to suit 
taste. Mrs. Edw. F. Redding. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

1 lb. powdered sugar, 1 lb. butter, 1 lb. flour, 
12 eggs, 1 lb. seeded raisins, 1 lb. seedless raisins, 



180 HAXOYER COOK BOOK. 



1 lb. citron, \ lb. figs, \ lb. dates, 1 lb. currants, 
1 teaspoonful cinnamon, 2 teaspoonfuls nutmeg, 
1 teaspoonful cloves, 1 wine glass of grape juice. 
Bake 3 hrs. in slow oven. Mrs. Merle D. Bishop. 

FRUIT AXD DELICATE CAKE. 

1 lb. sugar, 4 eggs, 1 cup butter, 1 cup sweet milk, 
1 lb. raisins, 2| cups flour, 2| teaspoonfuls baking 
powder. Add raisins to half dough. The other half 
add 1 tablespoonful of nutmeg, \ teaspoonful cloves, 
and 1 teaspoonful cinnamon. 

Mrs. J. H. Mackleduff. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

2 lbs. raisins, 2 lbs. currants, 1 lb. figs, \ lb. citron, 

1 lb. butter, 1 lb. sugar, 1 lb. flour, 12 eggs, f cup 
molasses, 2 lemons, 1 wine glass grape juice, 1§ 
grated nutmegs, 1 teaspoonful ground cloves, 2 
teaspoonfuls cinnamon. Line pan with paper and 
bake in slow oven from 3 to 3J hrs. 

Mrs. Robert M. Wirt. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

7 eggs (beat the whites separately), 1 cup butter, 

2 cups sugar, (granulated, sifted twice), 2 \ cups 
flour (measure before it is sifted 3 times), 1 cup 
milk, 1 lb. raisins, 1 lb. figs, \ lb. almonds, \ lb. 
English walnuts, \ lb. citron, 2 teaspoonfuls yeast 
powder, J lb. each of conserved cherries, pineapple, 
orange, and lemon. Bake 3 hours. Drop the 
cherries on top of batter. 

Mrs. L. H. Hoffacker. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

1 lb. of sugar, 1 lb. of currants, If lbs. of raisins, 
\ lb. of citron, \ lb. of butter, 1 lb. of eggs, (10 eggs), 
1 lb. of flour, 1 additional cup of flour in which to 
roll fruit, 2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, a wine- 
glass of grape juice. Work butter and sugar to a 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 181 

cream. In the following order add yolks of eggs, 
grape juice, whites of eggs beaten to a stiff froth, 
and flour with the baking powder. Lastly, stir in 
the fruit. Bake 2 hours. Mrs. Samuel Althoff. 

WHITE FRUIT CAKE. 

Three-fourth pound sugar, whites of 7 eggs, 5 oz. 
butter, f lb. flour, 1 teaspoonful baking powder, 

1 teacup sweet milk, three-eighths of a lb. of citron, 
^ grated cocoanut, 1 cup of blanched almonds cut 
fine. Mrs. C. B. Wirt. 

WHITE FRUIT CAKE. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, 2 J 
cups flour, whites of 7 eggs, 2 teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder, 1 lb. each of raisins, figs, and dates, J lb. 
citron, \ lb. currants, 1 cocoanut grated; beat well 
before adding fruit, stir fruit in last. Bake slowly. 

Mrs. W. F. Kintzing. 

RAISIN CAKE. 

Pour 2 cups boiling water over 1 lb. raisins and 
boil 15 minutes. Take from fire and add 1 cup 
cold water, 1 scant tablespoonful soda, \ cup butter, 

2 cups white sugar, 4 cups flour, 1 teaspoonful salt, 

1 teaspoonful each of cinnamon, cloves, and nut- 
meg. (Cream the sugar and butter). 

Mrs. F. C. Basserman. 

GOLD CAKE. 

Yolks of 8 eggs, 1 cup of sugar, f cup of butter and 
lard, \ cup of sweet milk, If cups of flour, 2 teaspoon- 
fuls of baking powder, flavoring. 

Mrs. Wesley Myers. 

GOLD CAKE. 

\\ cups granulated sugar, § cup butter, § cup milk, 

2 cups flour, yellow of 8 eggs and one whole egg, 2 
teaspoonfuls baking powder. Mrs. H. A. Smith. 



182 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



GOLD CAKE. 

Yolks of 8 eggs, 1} cups granulated sugar, two- 
thirds cup butter, two-thirds cup sweet milk, 2 J 
cups flour, 1 teaspoonful cream tartar, scant J tea- 
spoonful soda, flavor to taste. Sift flour once, then 
measure, add soda and sift 3 times; cream butter 
and sugar thoroughly, beat yolks about half, add 
cream tartar and beat to a stiff froth; add this to 
creamed butter and sugar and stir thoroughly; add 
milk, then flour. Put in a slow oven at once; bake 
30 to E0 minutes. 

GOLD LAYER.— Use the gold loaf recipe with § 
cup flour added; oven moderate; will bake in 15 to 
30 minutes. Can be baked in two or three layers 
and laid up with any filling desired. 

Mrs. Marsby Roth. 

GOLD CAKES. 

Beat very light the yolks of 12 eggs, add 1J cups of 
sugar, and h cup of butter. Beat until very creamy, 
add \ cup of milk, If cups of flour, 2 teaspoonfuls 
of baking powder, and flavoring. Bake in a mod- 
erate oven. Mrs. Frank Conrad. 

HICKORY NUT CAKE. 

\ cup butter, \\ cups sugar, f cup sweet milk, 
3 eggs, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder, 1 pt. hickory 
nuts, 1 pt. raisins, 2 cups flour. 

Mrs. Edw. F. Redding. 

HICKORY NUT CAKE. 

2 cups of white sugar, 3 cups of flour, \ cup of 
sweet milk, one-third cup of butter, 4 eggs, 2 tea- 
spoonfuls baking powder, 2 cups of kernels. 

Clarissa Reindollar. 

WALNUT LOAF CAKE. 

If cups sugar, \ cup butter, f cup sweet milk, 
3 eggs, 2 cups flour, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder, 
1 pt. of kernels, 1 pt. of raisins. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 183 



HICKORY NUT LOAF CAKE. 

One-half cup of butter, 1§ cups sugar, f cup sweet 
milk, 3 eggs, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder, 1 pt. 
hickory nuts, 1 pt. raisins, 2 cups flour. 

Mrs. C. B. Wirt. 

SHELLBARK AND RAISIN CAKE. 

1 lb. granulated sugar, J lb. butter, 1 cup sweet 
milk, 2\ cups flour, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder, 
1 pt. raisins, 1 pt. shellbarks, whites of 4 eggs. 

Mrs. W. H. Sheffer. 

SHELLBARK AND RAISIN CAKE. 

f cup butter, 2 cups granulated sugar, 1 cup milk, 
3 cups flour, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder, 1 cup 
raisins, 1 cup shellbarks, whites of 5 eggs (beaten 
stiff). Mrs. Paul A. Hoke. 

ICE CREAM CAKE. 

Whites of 5 eggs, 2 cups of granulated sugar, 
1 cup butter, 1 cup sweet milk, 3 cups flour, 2 tea- 
spoonfuls baking powder, add beaten whites of eggs 
last. Layer cake. Sallie R. Winebrenner. 

ICE CREAM CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, f cup butter, 2\ cups flour, J cup 
corn starch, 1 cup sweet milk, 2 teaspoonfuls bak- 
ing powder, whites of 6 eggs. 

Mrs. Alex. Young. 
ICE CREAM CAKE. 

2 cups of sugar, 1 cup of butter, 1 cup of sweet 
milk, 2 cups of flour, \ cup of corn starch, balance 
of cup filled up with flour, the whites of 7 eggs, 
3 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, flavor with vanilla 
or rose. 



184 HAXOVER COOK BOOK. 



WHIPPED CREAM CAKE. 

\ pt. whipped cream, 1 scant cup sugar, 3 eggs, 
\\ cups flour, \\ teaspoonfuls baking powder, \ 
cup citron or raisins. 

Mrs. G. L. Terrasse. 
LADY BALTIMORE CAKE. 

1 cup of pulverized sugar, and 1 cup of granulated 
sugar, creamed, with § cup of butter, 6 eggs, leaving 
out the whites of 2 for the icing, 1 cup of sweet milk, 
3 cups of flour, 3 teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 

FILLING. — 1 cup of seedless raisins, 1 cup of 
currants, 1 cup of hickory nuts, 4 figs, and a small 
piece of citron, cut fine. Boil 1 cup of sugar with the 
white of 1 egg, not too stiff, and add the fruits. Spread 
each layer with this filling. Now make a plain icing 
with the remaining white and ice the whole cake. 

Mrs. Harry Stair. 



LADY BALTIMORE CAKE. 

Cream \ lb. butter and 1 lb. of sugar, add the 
beaten yolks of 8 eggs, and \ pt. of milk, then add 
1 lb. of fiour in which has been sifted 4 teaspoonfuls 
of baking powder. Lastly add the beaten whites. 
Flavor with almond or vanilla extract and bake 
in layers in a quick oven. 



MARSHMALLOW CAKE. 

2\ cups pulverized sugar, two-thirds cup butter, 
2 rounded teaspoonfuls of baking powder, whites of 
5 eggs, 1 cup milk, 2\ cups flour, flavor with almond. 
Cream butter, add sugar and unbeaten whites, 
beat 10 or 15 minutes, until light, add \ milk and | 
flour and then remaining milk and flour. Use white 
boiled icing, adding halves of English walnuts on 
top. Mrs. Frank Fry singer. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 185 



LEMON CAKE. 

f cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 4 eggs, 1 cup milk, 2 
teaspoonfuls baking powder sifted with 2J cups 
flour. Flavor with lemon juice. 

LEMON ICING— Stir the yolks of 2 eggs, add 
lump of butter the size of a walnut, grated rind and 
juice of 1 lemon and almost 1 pound of powdered 
sugar. Stir all together briskly and spread between 
the layers and on top of the cake. One-half a large 
orange may be used if orange cake is preferred. 

Miss Emily Young. 

MARSHMALLOW CAKE. 

2| cups flour, f cup butter, 2J cups pulverized 
sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, 2 teaspoonfuls baking pow- 
der, the whites of 5 eggs well beaten. 

Mrs. D. L. Slagle. 

MARBLE LAYER CAKE. 

Light part— 1 cup of white sugar, § cup butter, 
\ cup milk, whites of 3 eggs, 1 teaspoonful of cream 
tartar, \ teaspoonful soda, 2 cups of flour. 

Dark part. — § cup of brown sugar, \ cup of mo- 
lasses, \ cup milk, a half of nutmeg, 1 teaspoonful of 
cinnamon, \ teaspoonful allspice, § teaspoonful soda 
1 teaspoonful cream tartar, 2 cups of flour, and 
yolks of 3 eggs. Mrs. Bortner. 

MARBLE CAKE. 

Dark part. — \ cup of baking molasses, \ cup 
butter, | cup brown sugar, yolks 2 eggs, § cup thick 
milk, 1 teaspoonful soda, 1 teaspoonful each cloves 
and cinnamon. 

White part.— \ cup butter, whites 2 eggs, \ cup 
sweet milk, 1 cup sugar, 2J cups flour, 1 teaspoonful 
baking powder. 

Mrs. Henry Zouck. 



186 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



MARBLED CAKE. 

For the white part take cups of white sugar, 
| cup of butter, J cup of sweet milk, 2^ cups of flour, 
\ teaspoonful of soda, 1 teaspoonful of cream of tar- 
tar, the whites of 4 eggs, and fl avor with lemon 
extract or nutmeg. 

Colored part. — \\ cups brown sugar, \ cup of 
butter, \ cup sweet milk, \ cup of molasses, yolks 
of 4 eggs, 1 teaspoonful of soda, 2 teaspoonfuls of 
cream of tartar, 2J cups of flour, season with cinna- 
mon, nutmeg, and cloves. With a spoon drop the 
two batters alternately into the baking dish. 

Mrs. Susan Eyster. 

ANGEL FOOD CAKE. 

Take the whites of 9 eggs; pinch of salt; \\ cups 
granulated sugar, sifted; 1 cup flour sifted three 
times; \ teaspoonful cream of tartar, \ teaspoonful 
vanilla or almond extract. Sift, measure and set 
aside sugar and flour. Add pinch of salt to eggs 
and whip to foam, add cream of tartar and whip 
until very stiff, add sugar and flavoring and fold 
in, then flour folded in lightly. Will bake in 35 or 
40 minutes. Do not grease pan. 

Mrs. Arno M. Pfaff. 

ANGEL CAKE. 

Whites of 9 eggs, 1| cups of sugar, 1 cup flour, 
scant \ teaspoonful cream tartar, a pinch of salt 
added to the eggs before whipping, whip eggs about 
half, add cream tartar and whip until very stiff, add 
sugar and beat in, then flavor, then flour. Sift 
flour 4 times, sugar 2 times. Bake in moderate 
oven. Will bake in 30 to 40 minutes. 

Mrs. W. F. Kintzing. 

ANGEL CAKE. 

Whites 11 eggs, scant \\ cups sugar, 1 cup flour. 
Sift sugar and flour 4 times before measuring. Add 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 187 



pinch of salt to whites of eggs, and 1 even teaspoonful 
cream of tartar when eggs are half beaten. Beat 
whites until very stiff, add sugar and flavoring, 
carefully fold in flour. Bake in ungreased pan 45 
minutes. Mrs. Frank Bussom. 

ANGEL CAKE. 

Whites of 10 eggs, 1J cups of sugar, 1 cup of flour, 
1 teaspoonful cream tartar, 1 teaspoonful vanilla. 
Beat whites of eggs very stiff. When about half 
beaten add cream tartar. Sift sugar and flour each 
4 times then measure after sifting. Sift in sugar, 
then flour, add vanilla. Bake 45 minutes in a pan 
without greasing, in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. J. B. Weeks. 

ORANGE CAKE. 

5 eggs, yolks beaten separately with a pinch of 
salt, 2 cups sugar, J cup cold water, 2\ cups flour, 
whites of 3 eggs well beaten and put in last, grated 
rind and juice of 1 orange. 

Icing. — Whites of 2 eggs, 1 cup sugar, grated rind 
of 1 orange. Sarah Dusman. 

ORANGE CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, 3 cups flour, 1 cup sweet milk, 1 cup 
butter, whites of 4 eggs, and yolks of 5 eggs, grated 
rind of 1 orange, 2 large teaspoonfuls baking powder 
to be sifted with the flour. Bake in a quick oven. 

Filling. — Take the white of the 1 egg that re- 
mained, beat stiff, add sugar, and the juice of the 
orange, beat well, and spread between layers. 

Mrs. F. C. Zinn. 

IRISH POUND CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 4 cups flour, 1 cup 
sweet cream, 4 eggs, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder. 

Mrs. J. H. Mackelduff. 



188 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



POUND CAKE. 

Weigh 8 eggs, take their weight in butter, sugar, 
and flour. Flavor with 3 tablespoonfuls grape juice 
and 2 of rose water. Work sugar and butter very 
light, then break the whole egg, one at a time, and 
work well, then flour and flavoring. Bake 1 hour; 
the first half, have oven little over moderate, the 
last half cooler. Mrs. J. H. Fleming. 

POUND CAKE. 

1 lb. butter, 1 lb. sugar, 1 lb. flour, 6 eggs beaten 
separately, 3 teaspoonfuls baking powder sifted in 
flour, 1 cup sweet milk. Cream butter and sugar 
together, add the yolks of eggs, then milk and flour, 
and lastly the whites of eggs. Vanilla or lemon 
flavoring. Mrs. D. F. Stair. 

SUNSHINE CAKE. 

7 eggs, 1 cup of sugar, two- thirds cup of flour, | 
teaspoonful of cream tartar. Beat the whites and 
yolks of the eggs separately, sift the sugar and flour 
four times, and bake in a moderate oven for three 
quarters of an hour. 

Mrs. Charles E. Royer, 
Westminster, Md. 

SUNSHINE CAKE. 

Whites of 11 eggs, yolks of 3 eggs, 1J cups granu- 
lated sugar, 1 cup flour, 1 teaspoonful cream of 
tartar, 1 teaspoonful of orange extract. Bake 45 
minutes. Mrs. S. L. Bixler. 

SUNSHINE CAKE. 

Whites of 7 eggs, yolks of 5 eggs, 1 cup fine granu- 
lated sugar, 1 scant cup of flour measured after sifting 
5 times, also sugar, \ teaspoonful of cream of tartar, 
1 teaspoonful of orange extract. Beat yolks till 
thick and set aside, add pinch of salt, and cream of 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 189 



tartar to whites and beat until very stiff, add sugar, 
beat thoroughly, then add extract and beaten yolks, 
beat lightly and carefully fold in flour. Bake in 
tube pan ungreased in moderate oven 40 or 50 
minutes. Mrs. Bess Henderson. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

10 eggs beaten separately, yolks until very light, 
whites until stiff, 1 lb. of sugar, 10 ozs. of flour sifted 
3 times, juice and grated rind of a large lemon or 
orange, or both if preferred. To the beaten yolks 
add sifted granulated sugar, then the fruit juice, 
then the whites well beaten, fold gently in, then 
just as gently stir in the flour, Bake in a slow oven 
about 1 hour. Mrs. David Bixler. 

SPONGE RAKE. 

6 eggs, 1 cup of sugar, 1 cup of flour, \ teaspoonful 
of cream of tartar. Mix in flour and sift. Beat 
whites separately, then add sugar, beat well, add 
yolks of eggs, well beaten. Beat all thoroughly. 
Fold in flour. 

Mrs. L. H. Hoffacker. 

COLD WATER SPONGE CAKE. 

6 eggs, 3 cups sugar, beat sugar and eggs together 
20 minutes, then add 1 cup cold water, 4 cups flour, 

2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 

Miss Sallie Wilson. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

2 cups of sugar, 2 cups of eggs. Beat 25 minutes, 
then add 2 cups of flour. 

Mrs. O. N. Anthony. 
SPONGE CAKE. 

Beat 6 eggs thoroughly with a pinch of salt. Add 

3 cups of sugar (one cup at a time) and a dessert 



190 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



spoonful of lemon juice. Beat for fifteen minutes. 
Add 3 teaspoonfuls baking powder to 3 cups of 
sifted flour and fold this in very carefully. Add 1 
cup of boiling water slowly. Flavor with vanilla. 

Mrs. J. S. Moul. 

HOT MILK SPONGE CAKE. 

2 cups of white sugar, 4 eggs, Beat well. 1 cup of 
warm milk, 2 cups of sifted flour, 2 even teaspoonfuls 
of baking powder, 1 teaspoonful vanilla. 

Mrs. Arno M. Pfaff. 

BOILED SPONGE CAKE. 

Beat the whites of six eggs very stiff, add the 
yolks and beat light. Let \\ cups sugar and 1 gill 
of water come to a boil. Pour this into the beaten 
eggs, beating well until cool. Then fold in a scant 
pint flour. Bake in two layers. 

Icing. — Thicken the juice of one lemon with pul- 
verized sugar. Mrs. C. H. Sebright. 

WHITE CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, 1 cup of butter, 1 cup of sweet milk, 
3 cups flour, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder, white 
of 5 eggs, beaten stiff, stir in last. 

WHITE CAKE. 

One-half lb. of butter, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup sweet 
milk, whites 8 eggs, 3 cups flour, 3 teaspoonfuls 
baking powder. Flavor with almond. 

Mrs. Chas. Myers. 

WHITE CAKE. 

Whites of 12 eggs, beaten stiff, 2 cups sugar, 2 
cups butter, 5 cups flour, 3 teaspoonfuls baking 
powder mixed with the flour. Cream butter and 
sugar together, then add flour and eggs alternately, 
beating well. Bake in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. A. N. Forney. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 191 



WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE. 

1 cup butter, 1 lb. sugar, whites 10 eggs, 1 tea- 
spoonful cream of tartar dissolved in \ cup milk, 
\ teaspoonful soda sifted in 3| cups flour. Flavor 
with lemon. Bake in layers. 

Icing. — Whites 2 eggs, 1 lb. pulverized sugar, 
1 grated cooanut. Flavor with lemon. 

Mrs. H. M. Stokes. 

WHITE MOUNTAIN -CAKE. 

1 lb. pulverized sugar, 1 scant cup of butter, 4 
eggs, the yolks, 1 cup sweet milk, 1 lb. sifted flour, 
3 teaspoonfuls of baking powder, the whites of 6 
eggs, beaten to a stiff froth. Cream butter and sugar 
together, then add yolks of eggs and milk, then add 
flour and baking powder after sifting together, and 
lastly add whites of eggs. 

Icing.— \ lb. pulverized sugar, 2 tablespoonfuls 
sweet cream, 1 teaspoonful vanilla. Beat all to a 
cream, then add 1 grated cocoanut. 

Mrs. Hamilton Sheely, 

New Oxford, Pa. 

WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE. 

1 lb. flour, 1 lb. sugar, \ lb. butter, 6 eggs, 1 cup 
sweet milk, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder. Bake 
in layers. Mrs. L. B. Sprenkle. 

MOUNTAIN ASH CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 3 whole eggs, 2 tea- 
spoonfuls baking powder, 1 cup sweet milk, 3 cups 
flour; flavor with vanilla. Bake in two layers. 

FILLING. — Ice first with an orange icing made 
of 1 orange grated with 1 pound xxxx sugar. Then 
make a white icing, and spread over the orange 
icing. 

Mrs. H. F. Stair. 



192 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



YELLOW CAKE. 

Yolks of 8 eggs, and 2 whole eggs, 2 cups sugar, 
3 oz. butter, 1 cup sweet milk, 2 cups flour, 2 tea- 
spoonfuls baking powder. Flavor with lemon. 

Mrs. Chas. Myers. 

YELLOW LOAF CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, \ cup butter, 4 eggs, 3 cups flour, 
2 teaspoonfuls baking powder, \ cup sweet milk. 

Mrs. Reuben Sprenkle. 

LAYER VARIETY CAKE. 

1J cups of sugar, \ cup of butter, \ cup of sweet 
milk, 2 cups of flour, 3 eggs, beat the whites to a 
froth, 2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Take one- 
third of dough and add \ cup of chopped raisins, 
1 teaspoonful of cinnamon, 1 teaspoonful of cloves. 

Mrs. Susan E. Eyster. 

VARIETY CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, 2| cups flour, 1 cup sweet milk, 
| cup butter, 4 eggs, \ teaspoonful soda, 1 teaspoonful 
cream tartar. Dissolve soda in milk, add cream 
tartar to flour. To \ the above mixture, add 1 
teaspoonful each cinnamon, ground cloves, and 
nutmeg. Bake in layers. Mrs. Martin Moul. 

ANONYMOUS CAKE. 

1 pt. flour, \ cup butter, or lard, 2 eggs, 1 cup 
sugar, 1 cup sour milk, 1 teaspoonful each cream 
of tartar and soda. Pinch of salt. Bake 20 minutes. 

N. A. Gobrecht, 
Altoona. 

ONE EGG CAKE. 

i cup butter, \ cup milk, § cup sugar, \\ cup pas- 
try flour, 2 level teaspoonfuls Royal Baking Pow- 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 193 

der. 1 egg beaten without separating white from 
yolk, grated rind of 1 lemon or orange. 

Mrs. Mary W. Wise. 

HOT MILK CAKE. 

4 eggs, 2 cups sugar, 2 cups flour, f cup hot milk, 
2 teaspoonfuls baking powder. 

Mrs. Cora Weaver, 
Littlestown. 

GARFIELD CAKE. 

\ cup butter, 2 cups white sugar, 4 eggs, 1 cup 
sweet milk, 2\ cups flour, 2 teaspoonfuls baking 
powder. Mrs. B. R. Shultz. 

AMBROSIA CAKE. 

\\ cups sugar, \ cup butter, \ cup sweet milk, 3 
eggs, 3 cups flour, \\ teaspoonfuls baking powder. 

Spread. — J cup cream whipped, white 1 egg 
whipped, 1 grated orange and rind, \ grated cocoanut 

Mrs. H. D. Little. 

BARKER CAKE. 

3 eggs, \ cup butter, \\ cups sugar, 2 cups flour, 
\ cup sweet milk, 1 teaspoonful cream tartar, \ 
teaspoonful soda. Mrs. F. C. Zinn. 

BRIDE CAKE. 

\\ cups white sugar, \ cup butter, 1 cup flour, 
1 heaping cup of cornstarch, \ cup sour milk, white 
of 3 eggs, 1 teaspoonful extract of lemon; a small 
quantity of soda. 

BUCKEYE LOAF CAKE. 

2 cups of sugar, f cup . of butter, 3 eggs, 1 cup 
of sweet milk, 3 cups of flour, 2 teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder. Flavor with lemon or vanilla. 

Mrs. Wm. Stair. 



194 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



CARAMEL CAKE. 

| cup butter, 1 cupful sugar, 3 eggs, J cup sweet 
milk, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder, 2 cups flour, 
Sim Tier 3 tablespoonfuls chocola te with § cup milk, 
and \ cupful sugar, flavor with 1 teaspoonful vanilla. 
Let cool and add to the cake before putting in the 
flour and the whites of the 3 eggs beaten very light. 

Caramel icing. — 2 cups of brown sugar, 1 cupful 
of cream or rich milk and butter size of a walnut; 
boil till it forms a soft ball when tried in water 

Mrs. H. B. Baer. 



BLITZ TORTE (Cake) 

\ cup butter, \ cup sugar, yolks of 5 eggs, 5 table- 
spoonfuls .milk, 1 cup flour, 1 heaping teaspoonful 
baking powder, vanilla. Spread in two layers and 
bake till nearly done, then frost with: beaten whites 
of 5 eggs, 1 cup sugar, \ lb. almonds, blanched and 
chopped and spread over the beaten whites. Then 
finish baking. 

FILLING. — 1 cup milk, 3 tablespoonfuls corn- 
starch, 1 egg yolk, butter the size of a walnut, van- 
illa. Boil and put between the cake layers. 

Mrs. Wesley C. Stick. 



DELICATE CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, f cup butter, 1 cup sweet milk, 1 
teaspoonful vanilla, or almond extract, 3 teaspoon- 
fuls baking powder sifted with 3 cups flour, whites 
of 5 eggs, beaten stiff and added last. 

Icing. — 1 cup granulated sugar, a cup light brown 
sugar, 3 tablespoonfuls cocoa, 1 cup milk. Boil 
until it forms a soft ball when dropped into cold 
water. Add 1 tablespoonful butter, 1 teaspoonful 
vanilla. Beat until it is the right consistency to 
spread on the cake. 

Mrs. E. K. Eichelberger. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 195 



WELLESLEY CAKE. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup milk, 1 cup corn 
starch, 2 cups flour, 2 level teaspoonfuls baking 
powder, 5 egg whites. Cream the butter, add gradu- 
ally the sugar. Sift together the flour, corn starch 
and baking powder and add alternately with the 
milk to the first mixture. Beat the egg whites stiff, 
add and beat vigorously. To one-third of the mix- 
ture add li squares of chocolate melted. Cover the 
bottom of pan with the white mixture, add the 
chocolate mixture, and then the remainder of the 
white mixture by tablespoonfuls that the cake may 
have a marbled appearance. 

Mrs. Emma Shaffer. 
MARASCHINO CHERRY CAKE. 

1 cup sugar, one-third cup butter, \ cup sweet 
milk, 2 eggs, 1\ cups flour, 2 teaspoonfuls baking 
powder. One-half cup chopped walnuts, J cup 
chopped Maraschino cherries, flavor with cherry 
juice. Bake in layers, and spread layers with soft 
icing, nuts and Maraschino cherries cut in halves. 

Mrs. Chrostwaite. 

CITRON CAKE. 

1 cup butter, 1 lb. sugar, 4 eggs, whipped separa- 
tely, 1 cup sweet milk, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder, 
3| cups of flour, \ lb. of citron cut in strips and 
floured with the \ cup of flour. Add whites of eggs 
last, and bake in loaf. M. Bertha Zeiber. 

CREAM CAKE. 

2 eggs, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup sour cream, 2 cups 
flour, \\ teaspoonfuls of baking powder, \ tea- 
spoonful soda. 

Icing. — 1 level teaspoonful butter, 3 teaspoonfuls 
milk or sour cream. Thicken to the proper consis- 
tency with pulverized sugar, then mix well with 1 
heaping tablespoonful peanut butter. 

Mrs. Ed. H. M.oul. 



196 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



CUP CAKE. 

1 cup milk, 2 cups sugar, 3 cups flour, 4 eggs, 
1 cup butter, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder; flavor 
with vanilla. Cream butter and sugar, add eggs 
beaten separately, then milk, and last baking pow- 
der sifted with flour. 

Mrs. D. A. Frommeyer. 
CURRANT CAKE. 

2 cups pulverized sugar, one-third lb. butter, 5 
eggs, 1 cup water, 3 cups sifted flour, 2 teaspoonfuls 
baking powder, \ lb. currants, washed, dried, and 
floured. Sarah Dusnlan. 

DELICIOUS CAKE. 

2 cups of sugar, \ cup of butter, 1 cup of sweet 
milk, 3 eggs, 3 cups of flour, 2 teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder. Mrs. H. W. Swartz, 

New Oxford, Pa. 

DUNDEE CAKE, FINE. 

Beat to a cream \\ cups of butter, \\ cups of 
sugar; add 8 eggs, two at a time, beating 5 minutes 
between each 2 eggs, \ cup rich milk, \\ pts. of 
flour, 2 teaspoonfuls of baking powder sifted with 
the flour, \ grated lemon peel, 1 cup currants, 1| 
cups Sultana raisins, 1 cup almonds, chopped coarse- 
ly, flavor with vanilla, a few drops of extract of nut- 
meg, and \ teaspoonful of orange. Bake in long, 
shallow pans, in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. David Bixler. 

DOVER CAKE. 

1 lb. sugar, 1 lb. flour, 6 eggs, § lb. butter, 3 tea 
spoonfuls baking powder, 1 cup sweet milk, \ tea- 
spoonful vanilla. 

Mrs. C. Anthony. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 197 



FEATHER CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 4 eggs, 1 cup sweet 
milk, 3 cups flour, 3 teaspoonfuls baking powder. 
Flavor with vanilla. 

Mrs. H. M. Stokes. 

FEATHER CAKE. 

2 eggs, 2 cups sugar, \ cup butter, 3 cups flour, 
Cream the butter, add sugar, then eggs, 1 cup sweet 
milk, 1 teaspoonful baking powder. 

Mrs. J. A. Cremer. 

FEDERAL CAKE. 

1 qt. milk, 4 eggs, \ lb. butter, \ pt. yeast. Scald 
the milk, and when lukewarm stir in the yeast, 
eggs and butter, with enough flour to make it as 
stiff as you can stir it with a spoon. Set in a warm 
place to rise, then work out into pans and let rise 
again, then bake from \ to f of an hour. When 
baked split into layers, spread with butter, sugar, 
and cinnamon. Eat while hot. This makes 2 good- 
sized cakes. Miss Anna Forney. 

FIG CAKE. 

Three-fourth lb. of sugar, \ cup butter, 3 eggs, 
j cup sweet milk, f lb. flour, 2 teaspoonfuls baking 
powder, \ lb. figs, cut fine. Flavor with vanilla. 

Icing for cakes. — 2 cups of sugar, 1 cup water, 
boil until threads, pour into 2 well beaten whites of 
eggs, flavor with vanilla. Mrs. C .Anthony. 

PRUNE CAKE. 

Cream together If cups sugar and f cup butter, 
3 tablespoonfuls sour cream or milk, 4 whole eggs, 
1 cup stewed prunes, chopped. 1 teaspoonful 
each of cinnamon, allspice and nutmeg, and \ tea 
spoonful cloves. 2 cups flour measured after sifting 
twice. 1 level teaspoonful soda dissolved in a 



198 HAXOVER COOK BOOK. 

little water. 1 teaspconful vanilla. Mix in order 
given. 

Icing. — To boiled icing add 1 cup of chopped 
raisins and 1 cup chopped nuts. 

Mrs. Emil J. Stout. 

FLOAT CAKE. 

2 cups of sugar, f cup of butter, 1 cup of milk, 

3 cups of flour, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder, whites 
of 6 eggs. 

HOWARD LOAF CAKE. 

5 cups of flour, 1| cups butter, 3 cups sugar, 1\ 
cups sweet milk, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder, 

4 eggs, 1\ wineglasses of wine, § lb. raisins, J lb. 
currants. Mrs. L. B. Sprenkle. 

JOHNNIE'S BIRTHDAY CAKE. 

1 cup butter rubbed to a ci'eam with 2 cupfuls 
of sugar, 3 cupfuls of flour sifted 3 times with 2 level 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 4 eggs, beat whites 
and yolks separately, very lig it, 1 cupful of sweet 
milk. White or pink icing. 

Mrs. A. R. Brodbeck. 
JELLY ROLL. 

3 eggs, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup flour, 1 teaspoonful 
cream of tartai, \ teaspoonful soda dissolved in a 
teaspoonful of water. Bake in a long pan, spread 
with jelly, then roll. Mrs. F. C. Zinn. 

KAISER CAKE. 

3 eggs, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup flour, \ cup cornstarch, 
1 teaspoonful baking powder, \ cup of butter, \ cup 
sweet milk, and vanilla to taste. 

Icing. — Cup sugar, little water to boil, and whites 
of 2 eggs. 

Mrs. Anna K. Kaiser. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 199 



LADY CAKE. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups pulverised sugar, 1 cup corn- 
starch, 2 cups flour, 1 cup sweet milk, 2 teaspoon- 
fuls baking powder, whites 7 eggs, flavor with bitter 
almond. Cream butter and sugar, then add milk. 
Sift baking powder 4 times in cornstarch and flour, 
then add to mixture, flavor, last add beaten whites 
of eggs. Mrs. H. M. Stokes. 



LAKE GEORGE CAKE. 

1 cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup molasses, 1 cup 
strong coffee or sweet milk, 4 cups flour, 2 eggs, 
1 teaspoonful of soda, 1| lbs. of fruit mixed, currants, 
citron and raisijas, 2 teaspoonfuls of cloves and cin- 
namon mixed, some nutmeg. Anna H. lagle, 

Marietta, Pa. 

LAYER CAKE. 

2 cups of sugar, \ cup of butter, 3 eggs, 1 cup of 
sweet milk, 3 cupfuls of flour, 2 teaspoonfuls of bak- 
ing powder. This will make two layers. 

ICING. — 2 scant cups of brown sugar, 4 table- 
spoonfuls of water, butter size of walnut, \ cake of 
chocolate, grated; boil until it is tough when dropped 
on a cold plate. Mrs. D. D. Ehrhart. 



LOG CABIN CAKE. 

1 lb. of sugar, 1 lb. of flour, 4 eggs, 1 teaspoonful 
of soda dissolved in vinegar. Mrs. Susan Eyster. 



MOCK LADY CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, creamed; 2 cupfuls sugar, 1 
cupful sweet milk, 3 cupfuls flour, whites of 4 eggs 
beaten until light and added last, 2 teaspoonfuls 
baking powder, mixed with the flour. C. G. M. 



200 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



NEAPOLITAN CAKE. 

Dark Portion — § cup butter, 1 cup brown sugar, 
\ cup of Orleans molasses, \ cup of strong coffee, 
2J cups of flour, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoonful of soda, 1 tea- 
spoonful of cinnamon, \ lb. raisins. 

Light Portion — \ cup of butter, 2 cups of white 
sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, whites of 4 eggs, 3 cups of 
flour, 3 teaspoonfuls of baking powder. This is 
baked in alternate layers. H. Ethel Hoke. 

NO EGG CAKE. 

1 cup water, \ cup shortening, \ teaspoonful cin- 
namon, \ teaspoonful cloves, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup 
raisins, 1 teaspoonful salt. Boil all together, let 
partly cool, add 1 teaspoonful soda. Let cool alto- 
gether and add 2 cups flour. Mrs. J. C. Carey. 

NOTHING CAKE. 

2 cups white sugar, \\ cups of thick milk, \ lb. 
grated chocolate, \\ even teaspoonfuls of soda, melt 
and pour i^i with thick milk, f of a cup of boiling 
water, 2J cups of flour. 

Icing for Cake. — 1 lb. XXXX sugar, little lump 
of butter, 1 tablespoonful of vanilla and f of a cup of 
water; melt over steam. Mrs. E. P. Kuhn. 

NINE-MINUTE CAKE. 

3 eggs, 1 minute; 1^ cups of white sugar, 5 minutes; 
1 cup flour, 1 minute; \ cup cold water, 1 minute; 

1 cup flour, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder. Put this 
in last cup of flour; flavor to taste. 

Mrs. W. H. Sheffer. 

ONE-EGG CAKE. 

\\ cups sugar, 1 egg, butter the size of a walnut, 

2 teaspoonfuls of cream tartar, 1 teaspoonful of 
soda, 1 cup of thick milk and 2 cups of flour. 

Mrs. E. P. Kuhn. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 201 



QUEEN CAKE. 

Sift 1J cups flour, 1 cup sugar, 1 teaspoonful bak- 
ing powder, \ cup butter, whites of 2 eggs broken 
over butter, fill cup up with milk and beat 10 min- 
utes. 

CREAM ICING.— 1| cups brown sugar, f cup 
cream, 1 tablespoonful butter; boil until thick enough 
to spread on cake; if not thick enough boil a little 
longer. Mrs. Anna A. Kaiser. 

ROSE CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 5 eggs, \ lb. raisins, J 
lb. currants, J lb. citron, 1 cup sweet milk, 2 tea- 
spoonfuls baking powder, 3 cups flour. M. V. K. 

SCRIPTURE CAKE. 
1 cup butter, Judges 5:25; 2 cups sugar, Jeremiah 
6:20; 3 \ cups flour, prepared, Kings 4:22; 2 cups 
raisins, 1 Sam. 30:12; 2 cups figs, 1 Sam. 30:12; 
1 cup almonds, Genesis 43 :21 ; 1 cup water, Genesis 
24:20; 6 eggs, Isaiah 10:14; small bit of salt, Leviti- 
cus 2:13; 1 large spoonful honey, Ex. 16:31; sweet 
spices to taste, 1 King 10:2. Mrs. W. S. Alleman. 

TEA CAKE. 

1 cup sugar, \ cup butter, 1| cups flour, \ cup 
sweet milk, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoonful baking powder. 

Martha M. Fisher. 

TILDEN CAKE. 

1 cup butter, 2 of pulverized sugar, 1 of sweet 
milk, 3 of flour, \ cup cornstarch, 4 eggs, 2 teaspoon- 
fuls baking powder, 2 of lemon extract. This is 
excellent. Mrs. John A. Cremer. 

TAYLOR CAKE. 

1 cup brown sugar, § cup lard or butter, 2 eggs, 
1 tablespoonful of cinnamon, rub well, 1 pt. New 
Orleans molasses, 1 pt. thick milk, dissolve 2 table- 



202 HANOVE COOK BOOK. 



spoonfuls soda in a little hot water, add 3 large tin 
cups flour sifted. Drop same as drop cakes and 
bake in quick oven. N. A. Gobrecht, 

Altoona. 

FRENCH CRACKERS. 

2 cups sugar, | cup butter, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoonful 
baking powder, 2 big cups flour; roll very thin. 

Mrs. H. D. Little. 

FREXCH CRACKERS. 

1 lb. of sugar and 6 oz. of butter, creamed, yolks 
of 5 eggs, J lb. of flour, 1 teaspoonful of soda. Put 
egg, cinnamon, and sugar on top. 

Agnes Strickler. 



SAXD TARTS. 

1 lb. sugar, 3 eggs, § cup butter, 1 cup flour, roll 
thin and sprinkle on top with sugar and cinnamon 
after dampening with yellow of egg. 

Mrs. E. P. Kuhn. 



SAXD TARTS. 

1 lb. sugar, J lb. butter, 1 lb. flour, 3 eggs, cream 
butter and sugar, then add beaten eggs, then flour 
Roll very thin, wash with yolks of eggs on top of 
tarts, sprinkle with cinnamon and granulated sugar. 

Mrs. W. S. Alleman. 



SAXD TARTS. 

1 cup of butter, 2 cups of sugar, 3 cups of flour, 
1 egg beaten whole, \ teaspoonful soda, mixed dry 
with flour. Roll thin, put egg, cinnamon and sugar 
on top, and bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. Wm. Stair. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 203 



• SCOTCH SCONES. 

Cream 1 generous tablespoonful of butter, add 
1 qt. of sifted flour into which 2 heaping teaspoonfuls 
of baking powder and a little salt have been well 
mixed. Thin with sweet milk, about 1 pt., beating 
well with eggwhip. Drop in small quantities 
and far apart on greased sheets. Bake in rather 
quick oven. If not sufficiently browned when done 
place under gas broiler for a quarter of a minute. 
Eat while hot and serve in place of biscuits. 

Mrs. John C. Bowman. 

JUMBLES. 

1 lb. sugar, f lb. butter, If lb. flour, 4 eggs, \ gill 
rose water, Beat eggs very light. Use mace or 
nutmeg. Bake in slow oven. 

Mrs. H. M. Stokes. 

CARAWAY JUMBLES. 

One-half lb. butter, 1 lb. sugar, 1 gill of grape 
juice, 1 tablespoonful caraway seed, flour to make 
a soft dough. 

M. V. K. 

COCOANUT JUMBLES. 

J lb. butter, 1 lb. cocoanut, 3 eggs, 1 lb. sugar 
as much flour as will make a soft dough. Drop on 
cake sheets and bake in a moderate oven. 

M. V. K. 

COCOANUT JUMBLES. 

One-half lb. butter, 1 lb. sugar, 6 eggs, 1 lb. flour, 
1 cocoanut. Cream the butter well, add the sugar, 
cream again, then add the eggs. Stir in flour, then 
grated cocoanut last. Sift small teaspoonful baking 
powder in flour. 

Mrs. D. F. Schaeffer, 
Frederick Co., Md. 



204 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



COCOANUT SQUARES: 

2J cups granulated sugar, 1 ^up cream, butter 
size of an egg. Boil 20 minutes, add 1 teaspoonful 
of vanilla, 1 cup of shredded cooanut. Beat well 
and pour in a buttered pan. Cut in squares before 
cool. Mary Dusman. 

COCOANUT CRACKERS. 

1 \ lbs. flour, 1 lb. brown sugar, 3 oz. butter melted, 
\ pt. baking molasses, \ teaspoonful soda, 1 cocoa- 
nut grated. Roll thin. Mrs. L. B. Sprenkle. 

COCOANUT CAKES. 

One-fourth lb. butter, 1 lb. sugar, 1 lb. flour, 
1 grated cocoanut, 4 eggs, 1 teaspoonful soda, pinch 
cream tartar. Mrs. H. A. Smith. 

COCOANUT COOKIES. 

2 pts. flour, into that rub 1 teaspoonful cream 
tartar, \\ cups sugar, f cup butter, 2 eggs, 1 cup 
thick milk or cream, 1 large teaspoonful soda, 2 
packages shredded cocoanut, flavor to taste. 

Mrs. J. H. Brough. 



KISSES. 

Whites of 3 eggs, \ lb. sugar, beat very stiff. Drop 
on buttereo paper, bake 40 minutes. \ lb. nuts may 
be added last. Have platter, eggs and sugar very 
cold. Mrs. J. H. Fleming. 

WALNUT KISSES. 

One-half lb. kernels, 1 lb. pulverized sugar, whites 
of 4 eggs. Beat \ hour. Harriet S. Hoke. 

KISSES. 

1 lb. of granulated sugar, whites of 3 eggs, beat 
until it stands alone. Can divide the dough and put 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 205 



different flavors in or different kinds of nuts. Bake 
on greased paper. S. Spangler. 

KISSES. 

1 lb. granulated sugar, throw whites of 6 eggs in 
bowl on sugar, add pinch salt; beat together with a 
spoon f hour until a drop stands up. Then add 4 
tablespoonfuls of sifted cornstarch and vanilla to 
taste. Grease flat tins with butter. Drop from tea- 
spoon and bake in slow oven 15 minutes. 

Mrs. H. M. Rudisill. 

DROP CAKE. 

3 eggs, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup rich sour cream, if 
not possible to get it rich, add 2 tablespoonfuls 
butter, i teaspoonful soda, § teaspoonful salt, grated 
nutmeg to flavor. Stir in slowly sufficient flour to 
make thick batter, about the consistency of pound 
cake. Bake in buttered muffin pans in hot oven. 

Mrs. W. B. Allewelt. 

DROP CAKE. 

3 cupfuls of sugar, 1 cupful of butter, 1 cupful 
of sour milk, 4 eggs, 1 teaspoonful of soda, 1 tea- 
spoonful of cream of tartar, a little nutmeg. Flour 
enough to drop easily from spoon. 

Mrs. D. D. Ehrhart. 

SUGAR CAKES. 

2 eggs, 2 cups of sugar, 1 cup of butter, 1 cup of 
thick milk, 1 teaspoonful of soda, \ teaspoonful 
cream tartar; flour to roll. Mrs. W. H. Sheffer. 

SUGAR CAKES. 

Beat 1 lb. of sugar and 3 eggs together, then \ cup 
of butter and 1 cup of sour cream with enough flour 
to stiffen. A half teaspoonful of soda with the 
cream. Flavor with lemon. Mix with a knife. 

Miss Emma Dellone. 



206 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



ONE EGG SU^AR C ^KES. 

1 lb. sugar, 1 egg, 1 cup sweet milk* 1 cup butter, 
1 teaspoonful cream tartar, \ teaspoonful soda, 
sprinkle sugar over top and roll. 

Mrs. L. B. Sprenkle. 

SUGAR COOKIES. 

2 cups of sugar, 1 cup of butter, 1 cup of good 
sour cream, 2 eggs, 4 cups of sifted flour, 1 teaspoon- 
ful of soda. The dough will seem soft, but the softer 
you can roll it the better the cakes are. 

Mrs. 0. T. Everhart. 

DROP S JGAR COOKIES. 

1 cup sour milk, 2 cups granulated sugar, 1 egg, 
1 teaspoonful soda in flour, flour enough to make a 
stiff dough, 1 cup melted butter. Beat egg and 
sugar well. Add milk and flour alternately. Then 
melted butter. Drop with teaspoon on greased 
pan. Nuts or raisins can be put on top. 

Mrs. F. C. Eckert. 

COOKIES. 

2 cups of sugar, 2 eggs, \ cup sour milk, 1 cup 
sour cream, 1 cap of lard and butter, 1 teaspoonful 
of soda. Add flour to roll. Mrs. L. A. W. 

BACHELOR BUTTONS. 

10 oz. flour, 10 oz. sugar, \ lb. butter, 2 eggs. 
Mix butter and flour together, then add sugar and 
eggs, well beaten. Make small balls, roll them in 
granulated sugar, and flatten then a little, and bake 
on a well greased tin. Mrs. D. F. Stair. 

BACHELOR'S BUTTONS. 

Put 6 oz. butter in 15 oz. flour. Add 15 oz. white 
sugar. Beat 3 eggs with half the sugar, and mix 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 207 



together. Add vanilla flavor to suit the taste. Roll 
as large as shell barks, sprinkle with sugar, place 
in buttered tins; bake lightly. 

Mrs. Luther Haverstick. 

GRAHAM CRACKERS. 

2 cups graham floui , 2 cups white flour, 1 lb. brown 
sugar, \ ctip butter, 1 small tea spoonful soda in \ 
cup hot water, 1 cup chopped raisins. 

Mrs. Harry Schriver. 

CRACKERS WITH NUTS. 

2 cups of sugar, \ cup sweet milk, \ cup shorten- 
ing, 2 eggs, \ teaspoonful of soda, 1 teaspoonful 
crea a taitaf , 1 cup of nuts. 

Mrs. H. W. Swartz, 
New Oxford, Pa. 

PEACH KERNEL CAKES. 

1 lb. sugar, 4 eggs, 1 cup kernels, 1 lb. flour, 
sprinkle with sugar before rolling out. 

Mrs. M. 0. Smith. 



MARSHMALLOW AND BUTTER THINS. 

Spread butter thins with butter and put a marsh- 
mallow on each. Place in a slow oven for a very 
few minutes and let brown. Serve hot at once or 
the marshmallows will fall. 

Miss Emily L. Young. 



NUT CAKES. 

1 lb. granulated sugar, 1 lb. nuts, 6 eggs, 2 cups 
flour. Beat whites separately, yolks and sugar put 
together, add flour, nuts last. 

Mrs. W. F. Kintzing. 



208 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 

NUT CAKES. 

Whites of 6 eggs, 1 lb. pulverized sugar, 1 lb. nuts, 
1 tablespoonful cornstarch. Bake in slow oven. 

Mrs. Warren Hafer. 

HERMITS. 

H cups sugar, 2 eggs, h cup butter, 3 cups flour, 
i cup milk, \ cup warm water, 1 teaspoonful soda, 
1 teaspoonful each cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, 1 
lb. seedless raisins. Boil raisins 20 minutes, drain 
and mix with the dough. 

Mrs. Jos. R. Kump. 

BRIDE CAKES. 

1 lb. of sugar, 1 lb. flour, 5 eggs, 1 teaspoonful 
soda. Mrs. C. Anthony. 

CHOCOLATE CAKES. 

1 lb. sugar, whites of 5 eggs, J cake chocolate 
1 cup flour. Mrs. C. Anthony. 

PEPPERNUTS. 

1J lbs. sugar, 1 lb. butter, 6 eggs, 1 cup sweet 
milk, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder, enough flour 
to roll. Mrs. David S. Tanger. 

LADIES' FINGERS. 

1 cup of sugar, h cup of butter, beaten together, 
1 egg, | cup of milk, 1 pt. of flour, 1 teaspoonful of 
cream of tartar, \ teaspoonful of soda, If teaspoon- 
fuls vanilla. Cut in strips, roll in sugar and bake in 
quick oven. Nora Michael. 

BUTTER CAKES. 

3 eggs well beaten, f lb. of sugar, white, f lb. 
butter, 1\ lbs. flour, 1 teaspoonful vanilla, 2 tea- 
spoonfuls baking powder. Make up in the evening, 
roll out and bake the next morning. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 209 



ALMOND CRACKERS. 

One-half cup butter, 1 cup powdered sugar, § cup 
of sweet milk, 2 cups flour. Mix butter and sugar 
to a cream, pour in the milk slowly, then add flour. 
With palm of hand pat out the mixture on buttered 
tins as thin as possible, cover with blanched almonds 
finely chopped. Mrs. Clinton J. Gitt. 

SUGAR WAFERS. 

1 cup sugar, 1 cup butter, \ cup sour cream, 2 
eggs, 1 teaspoonful soda, dissolved in a little of the 
cream, 2 teaspoonfuls cream of tartar in enough flour 
to stiffen, 1 teaspoonful vanilla. Roll into thin 
sheets, sprinkle with sugar, cut in small cakes and 
bake in moderate oven. Mrs. Naill. 



EMMA CAKES. 

1 lb. flour, 1 lb. sugar, three-eighth lb. butter, 3 
eggs, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder. Cut round, 
wash with yolks of egg and sprinkle with sugar and 
cinnamon. Miss Emily L. Young. 

LEMON CRACKERS. 

1 cup of butter and 2 cups of sugar beaten to a 
cream, 2 eggs beaten separately, 1 teaspoonful of 
soda, dissolved in 2 tablespoonfuls of sour milk, 
the grated peel and juice of a lemon or lemon ex- 
tract, flour enough to roll. 

Mrs. Wm. Stair. 

OATMEAL CRACKERS. 

2 cups brown sugar, \ cup butter, \ cup hot water, 
2 cups oatmeal, scant teaspoonful soda in part of 
the water, flour to make them very stiff. Roll very 
thin. Mrs. Geo. Grove. 



210 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



ROLLED OATS WAFERS. 

1 lb. of brown sugar, 2 cups of rolled oats, 1 cup of 
hot water, 1 cup of melted lard, 1 teaspoonful of 
soda. Mix all together, add enough flour to roll 
thin, and bake in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. Jacob Trone. 

OAT FLAKE MACCAROONS. 

3 cups oat flake, 2 cups granulated sugar, 2 cups 
flour, 1 cup butter, 2 cups raisins, 1 cup black wal- 
nuts, 2 eggs, 1 tablespoonful vanilla, 1 teaspoonful 
soda sifted in flour. Mix butter and sugar together 
at noon, at supper time add eggs and beat light, then 
add all the rest and mix thoroughly. Set in cool 
place until next morning, then make into little balls 
size of hickory nut, and place far apart on bake pan. 
Bake in slow oven; watch carefully. 

Mrs. Paul Hoke. 

ROLLED OATS COOKIES. 

One-half cup butter, 1 scant cup sugar, 1 egg, 
teaspoonfuls baking powder, 1 teaspoonful vanil- 
la,. 2 teacups rolled oats. Mix butter and sugar well, 
add egg beaten light. Mix baking powder with large 
teaspoonful of flour, add to rolled oats and then to 
trie other mixture. Roll the size of a hickory nut 
and bake. ~ Mrs. R. L. Ehrhart. 

MRS. MICHAEL ETZLER'S GINGER CAKES 

One-half cup of sugar, 1 cup molas$e,s, \ cup 
butter, 1 teaspoonful of cinnamon, 1 teaspoonful of 
gingjer, f teaspoonful of cloves, 2 even teaspoonfuls 
of soda in a cup of hot water, 2 J cups of flour, 2 well 
beaten eggs. Bake in muffin rings in a quick oven. 

GINGER DROPS. 

1 cup melted lard, 1 cup of baking molasses, 1 cup 
brown sugar, 3 eggs, 1 tablespoonful ginger, cinna- 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 211 



mon, a little powdered clove and allspice, 1 tea- 
spoonful soda dissolved in 1 cup of hot water, 2 
cups of flour. Bake in muffin pans. 

Miss Emily L. Young. 

DROP GINGER CAKES. 

1 pt. N. 0. molasses, 1 cup brown sugar, 1 large 
cup of lard beaten very light, 1 cup thick milk, 2 
whole eggs, 4 \ or 5 cups flour, 1 teaspoonful ginger, 
and cinnamon, 1 tablespoonful soda. Bake in 
quick oven. Mrs. J. H. MacklefdufF. 

GRANDMA'S MOLASSES CAKES. 

1 egg, 1 cup molasses, 1 cup lard, J cup thick milk, 
or coffee, spice to taste, \ cup brown sugar, 1 tea- 
spoonful aods, 1 pt. flour, 1 cup raisins rubbed in 
flour. Mix in order given. Bake ia slow oven. 

Mrs^ H. M. Rudisill. 

MOLASSES CAKES. 

1 qt. molasses, 1 cup sour cream, 1 cup lard, 1 
tablespopnful soda, 1 teaspoo)n|ful crBam tartar, 
1 tablespoonful ginger, 10 cups flour. 

Mrs. H. B. Baer. 

DROP GINGER CAKES. 

1 pt. of baking molasses, 1 cup of lard, \ cup of 
brown sugar, 1 teaspoonful of ginger, \ teaspoonful 
of cloves, 1 cup of thick milk, 1 small teaspoonful 
of soda, \\ lbs. of flour. Mix all together. 

Agnes Strickler. 

DROP GINGER CAKES. 

1 pt. molasses, \ lb. brown sugar, 1 cup thick milk, 
1 cup lard, 2 eggs, 1 tablespoonful ginger, 1 table- 
spoonful cinnamon, 1 level tablespoonful soda, \\ 
lbs. flour. 

Mrs. Paul Winebrenner. 



212 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



GINGER SNAPS. 

1 cup of baking molasses, J cup of sugar, \ cup of 
butter and lard, \ teaspoonful of soda, cinnamon, 
cloves and ginger, flour enough to roll. 

Mrs. W. S. Hoffman. 

GINGER SNAPS. 

1 cup New Orleans molasses, 1 cup butter, 1 cup 
sugar. Place on the stove and let it come to a boil 
then take off immediately and add 2 teaspoonfuls 
ginger, 1 teaspoonful soda, flour enough to roll thin, 
and bake quickly. Mrs. F. C. Zinn. 

GINGER SNAPS. 

2 \ lbs. of flour, £ lb. of lard, f lb. of brown sugar, 
1 pt. baking molasses, 1 tablespoonful soda, 1 table- 
spoonful of ginger, cinnamon and cloves, J teaspoon- 
ful of black pepper. Mrs. C. S. Shirk. 

AUNT SUSAN HAUER'S GINGER NUTS. 

1 pt. molasses, 1 lb. of brown sugar, J lb. of butter, 
as much grated orange peel as is agreeable to taste, 
li tablespoonfuls of ginger, 1 of cinnamon, 1 of all- 
spice, flour enough to make stiff enough to handle, 
roll thin. Excellent. 

GINGER CRACKERS. 

One-half pint lard, J lb. brown sugar, 1 pt. mo- 
lasses, 1 teaspoonf il soda, 1 tablespoonful of cloves, 
1 tablespoonful ginger, and a little salt, make very 
stiff, roll t in. Mrs. David S. Tanger. 

GINGER CRACKERS. 

1 pint baking molasses, 1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup 
melted lard, \ teaspoonf 1 ginger, flour enough to 
stiffen. Roll out thin. 

Mrs. Mary Yost. 



HANOVE I COOK BOOK. 213 



GINGER CRACKERS. 

1 lb. sugar, 1 lb. butter, 1 qt. molasses, 4 lbs. 
flour, 2 oz. of ginger. Miss A. Kate Shriver. 

FAIRY GINGER BREAD. 

1 cup of butter, 1 cup of thick milk, 2 cups of 
sugar, 4 cups of flour, 1 teaspoonful >f ginger, J 
teaspoonful )f soda. Mix all toget ler, spread on 
cake tins very thin, bake in quick oven. Before 
baking score with knife very lightly, in order to 
break into squares. Mrs. Kate W. Himes. 

GINGER BREAD. 

1 cup of white sugar, 1 cup of molasses, 1 cup of 
thick milk, 3 cups of flour, f cup of lard, 3 eggs, 1 
teaspoonful of ginger, 1 teaspoonful of soda, \ tea- 
spoonful of cloves. Mrs. Wertz. 

SOFT GINGER BREAD. 

1 cup N. 0. molasses, 2 teaspoonfuls soda, 1 cup 
granulated sugar, 2 eggs, \ cup melted lard, 1 cup 
thick milfc, & cups flour, 1 teaspoonful cinnamon and 
ginger, \ teaipoonful cloves. 

Mrs. Clara Moul, 
York, Pa. 

BEST GINGER BREAD. 

One-fourth cup of baking molasses, fill cup up 
with white sugar, 1 cup of sour cream, 2 cups of flour, 
1 egg, 1 teaspoonful of ginger, 1 teaspoonful soda. 

Mrs. M. D. Feiser, 
New Oxford, Pa. 

SOFT GINGER BREAD. 

2 cups flour, 1 cup molasses, j cup brown sugar, 
\ cup sweet milk, \ cup butter or lard, 2 eggs, 1 
teaspoonful of soda in a tablespoonful of thick milk. 
Cinnamon and ginger to taste. Mrs. Chas. Delone. 



214 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



GINGER BREAD. 

\ cup brown sugar, § cup butter or lard, 1 cup 
molasses, 3 cups flour, spice to taste, 2 eggs. Mix 
well, then stir 2 teaspoonfuls of soda in 1 cup of 
boiling water. Stir in the water and bake in quick 
oven. Mrs. A. Sourber. 

GINGER BREAD. 

Pour 1 cup of boiling water over £ cup of butter; 
when the butter melts add 1 cup of molasses, \ 
cup brown sugar, then stir in 1 level tablespoonful 
of soda dissolved in 1 tablespoonful of vinegar. Add 
quickly 2| cups of flour. Add 1 teaspoonful each 
of ginger, and cinnamon, and a little grated nutmeg, 
and cloves. Beat batter well before putting in 
shallow pans to bake. This makes a nice hearty 
dessert to eat either with whipped cream or a pud- 
ding sauce. Mrs. Samuel Basehoar. 

GINGER BREAD. 

\ cup brown sugar, 1 cup baking molasses, \ cup 
lard, a little salt, 1 egg, (beaten separately), 2| cups 
flour, 2 level teaspoonfuls soda dissolved in cup o 
hot water, \ teaspoonful cloves, 1 teaspoonful cin- 
namon, and 1 of ginger. 

Mrs. F. G. Eckert. 

GINGER CAKE. 

1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup molasses, 3 eggs, 1 cup 
butter or lard, 1 cup hot water, 1 tablespoonful soda, 
1 tablespoonful ginger, 4 cups flour. A' d water 
last. Mrs. Wm. J. Young. 

COLONIAL GINGER BREAD. 

1 cupful of New Orleans molasses, placed in mixing 
bowl with i cup butter, \ cupful of sugar. Over 
this pour 1 cup of boiling water in which a level 
dessert spoonful of soda has been dissolved. Stir 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 215 



well and let cool, then add a cup of chopped wal- 
nuts, also 1 cup of chopped raisins, a teaspoonful 
each of ginger and cinnamon, 2h cupfuls of flour, 
and lastly 2 well beaten eggs. Bake in a shallow 
pan, serve warm. 

Mrs. William Fritz, 

Dover, N. J. 

HOT GINGER BREAD. 

3 eggs, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup lard, 1 cup baking molas- 
ses, 4 cups flour, 1 cup boiling water, 1 teaspoonful 
soda, 1 teaspoonful each of ginger, cinnamon, a 1 1 
allspice. Bake in moderate oven. 

Mrs. E. E. Henderson. 

KITTY'S GINGER BREAD. 

J cup sugar, § cup molasses, one-third cup lard, 
1 egg, J cup raisins, f cup sour milk, 2 cups flour* 
1 teaspoonful salt, § teaspoonful each of ginger, 
allspice and cloves. Mix sugar, molasses, lard and 
egg. Sift flour, soda, spices. Add milk. Put all 
together and beat fine. Try it. 

Mrs. Harry Beard. 



216 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



Canning 



CANNING FRUIT. 

Prepare fruit or berries, place in jars and seal. 
Boil sweet syrup and pour over fruit in jars, then 
place jars into wash boiler; pour boiling water over 
jars, let stand until cold. 

TO CAN SMALL FRUITS. 

Have a granite kettle with 2 or 3 inches of boiling 
water on the stove. Put the rubber ring and jar 
cover on the stove until wanted. Warm the glass 
jar, then roll it in the kettle until hot as can be, 
then set it upright, leaving a little water in the 
bottom. Drop the berries into the jar, and when 
full, take a small dipper and fill the jar with water 
from the kettle, allowing it to overflow several times. 
Adjust rubber and cover quickly, lift the jar out on 
a wet cloth and finish the screwing up process. Add 
boiling water to the kettle and proceed with next 
jar. Mrs. Clayton Hollinger. 

HOW TO CAN BEANS. 

Wash and string beans, pack into jars and cover 
with cold water in which a teaspoonful of salt has 
been dissolved, seal, and when you have filled enough 
jars, place a wash boiler on stove, first placing a thin 
board or cloth upon bottom of boiler so that jars 
will not touch the bottom of boiler, nor each other. 
Put in water enough to just cover top of jars, put 
lid on boiler and boil steadily for 4 hours. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 217 



CANNED CORN. 

4 qts. corn, 1 scant pint of coarse salt, 1 qt. water. 
Dissolve salt in water, boil the corn 15 minutes, 
and put in glass jars. Add a little sugar. Before 
using it soak it in cold water and when soaked 
dress as fresh corn. Mrs. A. Sourber. 

HOW TO CAN RHUBARB. 

Cut rhubarb in small pieces, cover with water, 
let come to a boil, put in jars and seal. 

L<ydia Kehr. 

TO CAN RHUBARB WITHOUT HEATING. 

Cut rhubarb in small oieces, pack in jars, cover 
with rain water, and seal. 

Lydia Kehr. 

CANNED PINEAPPL ]. 

Pare pineapple, shred with silver fork. To 1 lb. 
of fruit, add J lb. sugar, mix well, let stand from 
6 to 12 hours. Heat to the boiling point, seal air 
tight. 

Mrs. J. H. Fleming. 



218 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



Preserving 



FRUIT JELLY. 

Fruit should be cut and covered with water then 
simmered until tender before turning into jelly bags. 
The bags may be unbleached muslin or two thick- 
nesses of cheese cloth. Allow juice to drip. Use 
equal parts of sugar and drained fruit juice. Boil 
20 minutes; pour into tumblers. 

BERRY JELLY. 

Mash and beat berries until the juice runs readily, 
then strain through bags of unbleached muslin, or 
two thicknesses of cheese cloth, and let drip. Now 
follow the formula for fruit jelly. 

AMBER MARMALADE. 

Shave very thin 1 orange, 1 lemon and 1 grape- 
fruit, rejecting nothing but seeds and cores. Measure 
the fruit and add to it twice the quantity of water. 
Let it stand in an earthen dijsh over night and the 
next morning boil for 10 minutes only. Let stand 
another night, and the second morning add pint for 
pint of sugar and boil steadily until it jellies. This 
is supposed to make 12 glasses, but that depends 
of course, on the size of the fruit. Stir as little as 
possible during the two hours or more of cooking 
required. When finished it should be a clear, pale 
amber jelly, with strips of fruit well denned in it. 

Mrs. C. P. Walcot; 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 219 



STRAWBERRY PRESERVES. 

Cap the berries and look them over. Allow 1 lb. 
of sugar for each pound of berries. Put berries and 
sugar into aluminum or granite preserving kettle, 
set over slow fire until sugar is dissolved, shaking 
occasionally to keep sugar from sticking to bottom 
of kettle. After the juice is drawn, boil until thick 
as honey. 

STRAWBERRY HONEY. 

3 cups of sugar, 1 cup of water, boil ten minutes. 
Add f of a cup of mashed berries and a lump of 
alum the size of a pea. Boil five minutes, then put 
in glasses. Delicious with hot cakes or served over 
ice cream. Mrs. H. D. Becker. 

PRESERVED CITRON. 

Pare, core and cut the melon in small squares 
To every 6 lbs. melon, 6 lbs. white sugar, and the 
juice and rind of 4 lemons, \ lb. of green ginger. 
Put fruit into a kettle and cover with water and some 
peach leaves. Boil \ hr. or until clear. Put into 
cold water few hrs., tie ginger in a cloth, and boil in 
3 pts. water till the water is highly flavored, then 
remove ginger, dissolve sugar in ginger water, add 
lemon rind, boil and skim, aid citron and juice; 
boil until clear. Mrs. A. C. Matthews. 

CHERRY HONEY. 

2 cups of ground sour cherries, 2 cups of sugar, water 
enough to dissolve the sugar. Put sugar and water 
on to boil until it spins a thread when a small drop 
falls from the spoon. Then put the cherries in and 
boil 6 or 7 minutes. Mrs. Charles E. Royer. 

Westminster, Md. 

CHERRY HONEY. 

Grind one pint of sour cherries, add two pints of 
sugar and a bit of alum. Boil fifteen minutes. 



220 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



Delicious with hot cakes or served over ice- 
cream. Mrs. H. D. Becker. 

CHERRY HONEY. 

1 cup of ground cherries, 2 cups of sugar. Boil 
15 minutes. Mrs. C. N. Myers. 

SOUR CHERRY AND PINEAPPLE MARMA- 
LADE. 

Two quarts of sour cherries, seed and put through 
meat grinder, putting a bowl under grinder to catch 
juice. Add juice to fruit just ground. 

One large pineapple, cut into slices and peeled. 
Put through grinder and have bowl to catch juice, 
as with cherries. Put juice lack into pineapple. 
Mix in the proportion of f of a cup of pineapple 
and juice to one cup of cherries and juice, then add 
sugar equal to the total amount of mixed fruit. 
Cook until thick. Mrs. J. W. Gitt. 

PINEAPPLE HONEY. 

P t iito kettle 3 lbs. granulated sugar, add pint 
of water. Boil that for \ hr., add 2 grated pine- 
apples, boil 15 minutes longer. Add piece of alum 
the size of a cherry stone. Mrs. C. S. Shirk. 

PINEAPPLE AND STRAWBERRY CON- 
SERVE. 

1 pineapple cut into bits, 3 quarts of strawberries, 
3 lbs. of sugar. Cook until thick enough to put into 
jelly glasses. Mrs. C. P. Wolcott. 

GREEN GRAPE CONSERVE— VERY GOOD. 

3 pts. granulated sugar, 2 pts. green grapes, seeded, 
1 pt. seedless raisi*ns, 2 oranges. Grapes must be 
very hard to be easily cut in half and seeds removed. 
Wash rafei'ns, cover' wi^th warm water, not hot, set 
on back of stove to soften a little; chop orange peel 



ANOVER COOS BOOK. 



221 



very Ine, chop pulp of orange separately. Cover 
sugar vith water, and add orange peel, boil until 
clear, then add grapes and boil thoroughly for 5 
minutes, add raisins and orange pulp, and boil until 
it is of the right consistei cy, not [uite as thick as 
preserves. Put into airtight jars. Do not stir at 
any time, but turn gently with a spoon, so that 
fruit all cooks alike. 

Kr.te W. Himes. 

GRAPE FRUIT MARMALADE. 

One grape fruit, 1 orange and 1 lemon. Use fresh, 
ji icy fruit, take out seeds and core, ut do not peel. 
Cut fruit into very thin slices. Measure and add 
three times the amount of water, and let stand over 
night in an earthen bowl. Next morning boil ten 
minutes. Let stand another night, and the second 
morning add pint for pint of sugar. Boil until it 
jellies, skimming frequently. 

Mrs. Lulu P. Stover. 

QUINCE CHIPS. 

Cut fruit into chips, cover with cold water, and 
boil until tender, then make your preserves, using 
1 pint of the chips, 1 pt. of juice and 1 pt. sugar. 

Mrs. Clara Moul, 

York, Pa. 

QUINCE HONEY. 

Take 1 nice large quince, 1 pt. of water, with 
1 lb. of sugar. Grate quince on fine grater, put all 
together in a preserving kettle and boil 20 minutes. 

Mrs. Susan Livingston. 



QUINCE HONEY. 

3 lbs. sugar, 2 qts. of water, boil 35 minutes, add 
1 pt. of grated quince and boil 20 minutes. 

Mrs. Haverstock. 



222 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



RHUBARB CONSERVE. 

3 lbs. rhubarb, washed and cut into inch lengths, 
3 lbs. sugar (scant), J lb. English walnut meats, f 
lb. raisins, 1 orange and grated rind, juice of 1 lemon. 

Boil rhubarb, s igar, orange, and lemon about 
half a i hour. Add nuts and raisins and boil from 
20 to 30 minutes longer, or until thick enough to 
put in glasses. 

Mrs. C. P. Wolcott. 

JAMS. 

Jams are usually made with small fruit or with 
chopped large fruits; they are cooked with an equal 
weight of sugar until rich and thick, then put into 
tumblers or jars and sealed. 

LEMON" CHEESE. 

1 lemon, 3 eggs, 1| cups of sugar, lump of butter 
size of wal ut. Grate the lemon, using all >ut tie 
tough part. Boil all together to a smooth paste. 

Mrs. E. R. Barker. 

CORN COB SYRUP. 

Cut into small pieces 12 large red cobs, new prefer- 
ed, put then in 1 gal. water and boil down to half 
the quantity; strain well, and to the liquic add 2 
lbs. brown sugar and 4 lbs. white sugar, boil this 
20 minutes. Strain into bottles while warm, and 
whe cool, cork well and seal with paraflne. 

Mrs. M. C. W. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 223 



Ice Cream, Ices, Etc. 



FROZEN STRAWBERRIES. 

1 qt. strawberries, juice of 2 lemons, 1 lb. sugar, 
1 qt. water. Add sugar and lemon juice to berries. 
Stand this aside for about 1 hr., then mash berries, 
add water and stir until sugar is thoroughly dis- 
solved. Freeze slowly. Mrs. G. L. Terrasse. 



FROZEN CUSTARD. 

1 qt. of milk, 4 eggs, 1 cup of sugar, flavor to suit 
the taste. Let milk come to a boil, then stir in the 
eggs and sugar, let boil a minute longer, then let 
stand until cool, and freeze as ice cream. 

Mrs. Henry Zouck. 



FROZEN TOM AND JERRY. 

Beat together the yolks of 4 eggs and 1 cupful of 
powdered sugar until light. Add 1 pt. of milk, 
4 tablespoonfuls of flavoring, the whites of the eggs 
beaten to a stiff froth, and freeze at once. 

Mary L. Slagle. 



PEACH SHERBERT. 

1\ lbs. sugar, 1 qt. water, juice of 1 lemon, 1 qt. 
peach pulp and j ice. Freeze. 

Mrs. Hugh B. Hostetter. 



224 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



CURRANT SHERBERT. 

1 pt. currant juice, 1| pts. water, juice of 1 lemon, 

1 pt. sugar, 1 tablespoonful gelatine which has been 
soaked in cold water, and dissolved in \ pt. boiling 
water. Mix it with the cold water, add the sugar, 
lemon and currant juice, then freeze. 

Miss Forney. 

LEMON SHERBERT. 

Freeze 1 qt, of milk and 1 cup of sugar. When 
nearly done add the juice of two lemons. 

Mrs. C. H. Sebright. 

LEMON SHERBERT. 

Heat to boiling point 2 qts. of milk and cream, 

2 tablespoonfuls of cornstarch, 1 cup of sugar, 6 
lemons. Take rind of lemons and simmer wi*|th pt. 
of water, 3 cups of sugar. Mix all together and 
freeze. Add the beaten whites of 2 eggs when partly 
frozen. Mrs. J. A. Melsheimer. 

LEMON ICE. 

5 large lemons, the rind and juice, \ gal. boiled 
water, 1J lbs. sugar, Stir well together and strain 
When cool freeze. After it has started to freeze add 
| pt. of sweet cream. Mrs. Geo. H. Grove. 

PINEAPPLE WATER ICE. 

Add \\ lbs. of sugar to 3 qt. of water, boil rapidly 
for 5 minutes, let cool. When cold add the juice of 
2 lemons and 1 qt. of grated pineapple. Mix, turn 
into a freezer and freeze, stirring slowly. If canned 
or preserved pineapple is used, allow only 1 lb. of 
sugar. Mrs. D. D. Ehrhart. 

CHERRY MOUSSE. 

To a pint of double cream, add 3 tablespoonfuls of 
confectioners sugar, a cup of cherry juice, and a 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 225 



drop or two of almond extract. Chill on ice, then 
whip until stiff. Turn in a mold, cover securely, 
and bury in a pan of ice and salt for 2 hours. Stra- 
berries can also be used. A. B. C. 



PEACH MOUSSE. 

Soak 1 teaspoonful gelatine in cold water, dissolve 
over hot water. Strain this into the sweetened 
pulp of 1 doz. peaches, add the juice of half a lemon. 
Whip 1 pt. of cream and chill. Stir the peach mix- 
ture in a pan of ice water until it begins to thicken, 
fold in the cream and pack with ice and salt. 

Mrs. J. C. Carey. 



ICE CREAM (VANILLA) 

1 qt, cream, \ lb. sugar. Heat \ the cream and all 
the sugar in double boiler. Take off fire and strain. 
Sti r in remainder of cream. Add vanilla and when 
cool freeze. Mrs. C. Stahr Hamm. 

Kingsport, Tenn. 



ICE CREAM (CHOCOLATE) 

1 qt. cream, 2 oz. chocolate, \ teaspoonful cin- 
namon, 1 tablespoonful vanilla, \ lb. sugar. 

Put half the quantity of cream, all the chocolate 
and all the sugar into double boiler. Put on to 
boil. Stii and beat until smooth. Strain. While 
hot add remainder :>f cream and vanilla. Cool and 
freeze. Mrs. C. Stahr Hamm, 

Kingsport, Pern. 

MINT ICE CREAM. 

To 1 lb. old fashioned mint sticks take 1 qt. of 
cream. Soak mint in 1 pt. of milk over night. In 
the morning pour in the cream nd freeze. 

Mary .inn. 



226 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



STRAWBERRY ICE CREAM. 

1| qts. of cream, 2 boxes of berries, li lbs. sugar. 
Press berries through a fruit press, and add sugar 
when thoroughly dissolved, add cream and freeze, 

Harriet A. Hoke. 

BISQUE ICE CREAM. 

To 1 qt. cream take 1 cup sugar and 1 doz. maca- 
roons. Take 1 pt. of the cream and heat to boiling 
point. Beat sugar and 1 egg together, and add to 
boiling cream. Set aside to cool, then add to rest 
of cream, and add macaroons, rolled, add one wine 
glass flavoring. Freeze. Mrs. G. D. Gitt. 

CARAMEL ICE CREAM. 

1 generous pt. milk, 1 large cup of white sugar, 
| scant cup of flour. Let milk come to boiling point; 
stir in this 2 eggs, sugar and flour that have been 
beaten very light. Stir well until this becomes a 
rich custard. Put a small cup of brown sugar into 
a pan; stir all the while until it becomes liquid and 
smokes. Stir this into custard, which has been 
kept hot. Set away to cool. When cold add 1 qt. 
very rich cream; strain well into freezer,. Flavor 
with vanilla. Mrs. Duncan. 

Gettysburg, Pa. 

ORANGE SOUFFLE, FROZEN. 

1 qt. of sweet cream, 1 pt. of orange juice, yolks 
of 6 eggs, | box, of gelatine, 1 lb. of granulated sugar, 
Cover the gelatine with \ cup of cold water; let 
soak 1 hr., then add \ cup of boiling water, stir 
until dissolved. Mix the orange juice and sugar to- 
gether until they form a syrup, beat the yolks to a 
cream; whip the cream. Mix the syrup and the eggs 
in a tin basin, stand the basin in a pan of very cold 
water, strain the gelatine and stir it until it begins 
to thicken, then lightly the whipped cream turn into 
an ice cream freezer, freeze about 2 hrs., not as hard 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 227 



as ice cream. This quantity will serve 10 people. 
Is very excellent for the sick. 

Sallie R. Winebrenner. 

SALTED OR ROASTED ALMONDS. 

1 lb. of almonds, remove the skins by plunging 
them into some boiling water. After mixing with a 
tablespoonful of melted butter and 1 of salt, put 
them into a baking pan and bake 15 min., or until 
crisp, stirring often. They must be a golden brown 
when done. Peanuts may be prepared in the same 
manner. 



228 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



Penna German Dishes 



ONION CAKE. 

Take curd and mix with good rich milk to the 
consistency of cottage cheese. Fry sliced onions 
until soft in butter and add to cheese. Season with 
salt; bake in pastry. 

SAUERKRAUT. 

Put into large earthen jar a thick layer of cut 
cabbage, add | cup of salt. Repeat until jar is filled. 
Put dry linen cloth over the top, add heavy weights, 
let stand 2 weeks. Take off cloth ,riftse, remove a 
little brine and replace cloth and weights; let stand 
again. This process requires about 6 weeks. 

TO COOK.— Add to 1\ lbs. of boiling pork, 1 qt. 
sauerkraut. Cook 2\ to 3 hours slowly. 

Cora Colehouse. 

SAUERKRAUT. 

Cut cabbage coarse, salt to taste, work with hands 
until brine appears, then pack in jars, put heavy 
press on, will be fit to use in 4 weeks. Keep salt 
water on top, do not let become drv. 

Miss M. V. R. 

POTATO DUMPLINGS. 

Boil potatoes and let cool, then grate. Take bread 
crumbs and brown in butter. Remove from stove 
take the potatoes and bread, and enough flour to 



HA TOVER COOK BOOK. 229 



make them stick together. Form into balls and roll 
in flour. Heat either chicken or b eef broth, and drop 
in dumplings, just let come to a boil. 

Mrs. George Sunday. 

PIGS IN BLANKET. 

Slice or cut into dice J doz. potatoes, then boil 
soft. Take as many bread crumbs as potatoes, put 
crumbs into pan, with'lump butter the size of walnut, 
parsley, salt and pepper to taste and a few slices of 
onion. Fry until brown, then add potatoes. Make 
noodle dough, cut in squares, and put in Ailing _ as 
for dumplings. Drop these into the broth in which 
potatoes have been boiled. 

Mrs. George Sunday. 

SCHMELTZ NOODLES. 

Take 1 egg, \ egg shell milk, and flour enough to 
make dough. 1 cup bread crumbs, fry or brown in 
butter. Boil noodles in a little salt water; when 
noodles come to top remove at once to a platter, and 
cover with bread crumbs. One layer crumbs and 
one of noodles. 

Miss Ida Sunday. 



SCRAPPLE. 

1 gal. broth in which pudding has been boiled, 
1 lb. pudding meat, thicken with 1 cup wheat flour 
and 3 pts. corn meal, 1 cup of buckwheat flour may 
be added if desired.- 

Mrs. A. L. Benford. 



CHESTER COUNTY SCRAPPLE. 

To 1 gal. broth in which meat has been boiled, 
add 7 lbs. pudding meat, cornmeal and buckwheat 
flour enough to thicken as mush. Season with salt 
and pepper. 



230 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



BEEF POT ROAST. 

Take a lean piece of beef, cut a little fat from it 
and fry in a pot a few minutes. Season the beef and 
sprinkle over a little flour, put in the pot and fry 
brown on all sides. Pour in hot water to half cover 
the beef, cover tightly and cook until tender. Add a 
little boiling water at intervals to prevent burning 
Thicken the gravy and pour around the meat on 
the platter. 

SCHNITTS AND KNEP. 

Enough for three people. — 1 egg, 2 cups flour, 3 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder; enough milk to 
barely moisten. Boil ham 1 hour before serving, add 
1 ci^p of sweet schnitts. Sweeten broth to taste. 
20 mintues before serving take from flame and add 
the knep, 1 spoonful at a time. Do not lift the lid 
after adding the knep. 

Cora Colehouse. 

GERMAN POTATO SOUP. 

Take 4 large potatoes, pare and cut into dice, 
boil in 1 quart of water until soft. Take J lb. of fat 
meat, cut into tiny pieces and fry. (If meat is very 
fat, pour off part of the drippings.) Take 2 medium 
sized onions, slice, and fry with the meat until soft 
and brown, and pour into the potatoes. Take cup 
sour cream mixed with 1 well beaten egg. Pour this 
mixture into the potatoes, meat and onions. Stir 
well, add enough vinegar to give sour taste, add more 
salt if necessary, let all come to a good boil. Serve 
hot immediately alter the soup is made. 

E. F. H. 

EXCELLENT LEAN SAUSAGE. 

Use one-third good tender beef and two-thirds 
pork; cut all very fine with chopper or machine; 
then to each 100 lbs. add 30 ozs. fine salt, 6 ozs. black 
pepper, an ordinary handful of crushed coriander 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 231 



and mix thoroughly. You will have the best sau- 
sage that ever sated an epicure's appetite. 

Jesse Fry singer, 
Chester, Pa. 

APPLE BUTTER. 

Pare and quarter 2 bushels of apples and 1 peck 
of quinces. Cook the latter soft in water and mash 
through a colander. Boil and skim J barrel of cider 
until no froth gathers. Remove part of this cider, 
leaving in the kettle just enough to cook the apples 
soft. When they are soft, add the mashed quinces. 
As the mixture cooks pour in the rest of the cider, 
a little at a time. When the butter is of the desired 
thickness, add sugar to taste. Sugar thins the butter, 
hence the cooking must be continued until the butter 
again becomes as thick as desired. Just before re- 
moying the kettle from the fire, add cinnamon and 
cloves to taste. 

Mrs. Geo. D. Gitt. 

BEEF ROLL, "ROLLARDIN". 

Cut a round steak into pieces about 5 in. square, 
cover each piece with thin slices of onion and bacon, 
dust with pepper and salt. Roll and tie each piece 
with string and potroast them for 2 hours. 

Mrs. Charles E. Althoff. 

HOT SLAW. 

Cut cabbage, take lump butter the size of an egg, 
put into pan with cabbage an steam until soft 
Beat 1 egg, J cup vinegar together, pour over cab- 
bage, salt and pepper to taste. Serve. 

Mary Zinn. 

CORNMEAL MUSH. 

3 cups cornmeal mixed with 3 cups cold water. 
Set kettle on stove until chill is removed. Now add 
12 cups of boiling water, stirring all the time that it 



232 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



may not become lumpy, add salt to taste. Boil for 
35 minutes over a steady fire. When done pour into 
molds. Slice when cold into thiln slices; fry in lard 
in a pan or griddle. Mush made this vay, only 
boiled 1 hr., may be used for the old fashioned dish 
"mush and milk." Edith Hesson. 

LEMON TOAST. 

Beat well the yolks of 6 eggs, and add 3 cups of 
sweet milk. Cut baker's bread, not too stale, into 
slices, dip them into the milk and lay slices in a pan 
with sufficient melted butter and lard to fry a nice 
brown. Beat the whites of 6 eggs to a froth, adding 
a large cup of white sugar, the juice of 2 lemons, 
and 2 cups of boiling water. Serve over the toast 
and you will find it a very delicious dish. 

Mrs. Samuel Althoff . 

TANGLED JACKETS. 

1 pt. of sour milk, 3 eggs, \ teaspoonful soda, 
1 teaspoonful salt, 1 lb. flour. 

Mrs. C. Anthony. 

FAT CAKES. 

3 eggs, \ cup lard, ] - cups sugar, 2 cups thick 
milk, 1 teaspoonful soda, flour enough to stiffen. 

Mrs. F. C. Zinn. 

FAT CAKES. 

1 lb. sugar, \ lb. butter, 4 eggs, 1 cup sweet milk, 
1 teaspoonful soda, and flour to stiffen. Drop in 
hot lard. Mrs. E. P. Kuhn. 

SALVATION ARMY DOUGHNUTS. 

5 cups flour, 2 cups sugar, 4 tablespoonfuls lard, 
| can condensed milk, 3 tablespoonfuls baking pow- 
der, 4 teaspoonfuls ground mace, \ tablespoonful 
salt, 1 cup water. Mix int a stiff s )ft dough and 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 233 



fry in deep fat. This recipe makes sixty dough- 
nuts. Mrs. H. S. Ehrhart. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

1 cake of yeast. ]J cupfuls milk, scalded and 
cooled. 1 tablespoonful of sugar. Dissolve yeast 
and sugar in milk. Add If cupfuls of flour. Cover, 
and put in warm place. Let rise about one hour, 
then add \ cup sugar. 3 tablespoonfuls butter, 1 
egg, | teaspoonful salt, 3 cupfuls of flour. Knead 
lightly. Let rise till twice the bulk. When light 
turn on floured board and roll to one- third inch 
thick. Cut with small doughnut cutter. Cover 
and let rise about forty-five minutes. Drop in 
deep, hot fat with side uppermost which has been 
next board. Mrs. E. K. Eichelberger. 

PUFF BALL DOUGHNUTS. 

3 eggs, 1 cup of sugar, 3 cups of milk, \ teaspoonful 
of salt, § teaspoonful of nutmeg, 2 teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder, about 1 qt. of flour. Drop by spoon- 
fuls into hot lard. 

Mrs. Laura Beard. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

1 pt. yeast, 1 pt. milk, 1 lb. sugar, 3 eggs, \ cup 
butter, and lard. Add enough flour to make stiff 
enough to roll out, just so they do not stick to the 
Angers. Let rise until twice quantity. Roll out, 
cut and let rise again. Fry in hot lard. 

Mrs. E. R. Schmuck. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

Boil and mash 3 or 4 large potatoes in water 
enough to make 3 coffee cups of the mixture. To 
this add a little salt, 1 cup of yeast, 1 cup of sugar, 
\ cup of lard, enough flour to make a stiff batter, 
cover well, keep in warm place over night. In the 
morning add 2 eggs, work into a soft dough, let 



234 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



rise, cut into cakes, let rise again, bake in hot 
lard. Mrs. Chas. Etzler. 

SNOW BALLS. 

Take 3 eggs, pinch of salt, enough flour to make 
stiff dough, roll thin, cut with wheel roller in 4 in. 
blocks, then cut into strips, tangle them, fry in hot 
lard. M. V. R. 

SNOW BALLS. 

Take 2 eggs and 1 gill of sweet milk, add flour 
enough to make a stiff dough, also a little salt. Roll 
thin and with a notched wheel pastry cutter cut into 
squares about 4 inches each way. Have ready a 
pan >f hot lard, mark each square into strips \ in. 
wide, leaving a border around \ in. deep. Pick them 
up to place in lard when hot, by taking alternate 
strips and lay them in sideways. They puff up into 
a flaky ball, and make a very nice addition to lunch 
or tea. Mrs. D. F. Stair. 

CRULLERS. 

One-half lb. of sugar, 2 eggs, § pt. of thick milk, 
\ cup of cold lard, \ teaspoonful of soda, \ teaspoon- 
ful cream tartar, flour to make a dough stiff enough 
to roll. A little nutmeg. 

Mrs. Charles J. Delone. 

CRULLERS. 

2 eggs, 1 cup of sugar, 1 pt. of thick milk, \ pt. of 
butter and lard mixed, 1 teaspoonful of soda and 
\ teaspoonful of cream of tartar dissolved in the 
milk. Flavor with nutmeg and add flour sufficient to 
roll. Swim in hot fat. Mrs. Wesley Myers. 

FASTNACHTS. 

\\ cakes of Fleishman's yeast rubbed in 1 pt. of 
flour, add enough warm water to make a sponge. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 235 



Let rai§e about 4 hours. Then boil 2 large potatoes, 
mash and let cool. Add 1 lb. white sugar, 3 eggs, 
J pt. melted lard, 1 qt. sweet milk, warmed a little, 
salt to taste. Stir in sponge and add enough flour 
to work stiff. Let raise until light. Roll out and 
cut and let raise again until light. Bake in boiling 
fat. Mrs. Thomas Murphy. 

FASTNACHTS. 

To 1 cake of yeast, : 3 small potatoes, 3 pints water, 
1| cups lard (scant), 2 cups sugar, flour to work stiff. 
Set the batter and let raise for several hours, then 
work stiff. The fastnachts may then be cut out or 
the batter may be allowed to raise a second time. 
After the fastnachts aire raised they should be 
dropped in very hot lard and fried- 
Mrs. Edw. F. Redding. 

FASTNACHTS. 

1 cup sugar, 1 cup yeast, 1 cup sweet milk, 2 eggs, 
1 cup mashed potatoes, scant \ cup lard and butter 
mixed. Mix all together, let rise f hour, knead in 
flour to make little stiffer than a soft dough. Let 
rise untij quantity of dough is doubled, cut out, 
rise again and bake in hot lard. 

Mrs. Cora Graybill. 

FASTNACHTS. 

3 potatoes boiled in enough water to cover. With 
the potato water scald 1 pt. of flour and add the po- 
tato mashed. When cool add 1 Fleischman yeast 
cake, dissolved in a little luke warm water. Start 
this about 5 P. M. At bedtime take a pint of flour, 
into it pour 1 pt. of lukewarm milk. Stir enough 
flour into the milk to make a batter that will drop 
readily from the spoon. To this batter add the first 
mixture and let rise over night. In the morning add 
4 beaten eggs, \ cup of melted butter, or butter 
and lard mixed, and 1 cup of sugar. Knead stiff 
enough to roll; let rise till the dough doubles its 



236 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



size. Now roll and cut out the dough and let rise 
again. When light, swim in hot fat. 

Mrs. T. J. O'Neill. 

SCHNECKENHAUS'LN. 

1 Fleischman yeast cake dissolved in \ cup of 
lukewarm^ water . Add 1 tablespoonful of sugar, 
a little salt, and flour to stiffen to a sponge. Let 
rise about 1 hour. Now add 2 cups of lukewarm 
milk, 4 tablespoonfuls of sugar, \ cup of melted but- 
ter, (butter and lard will do) 2 eggs beaten whole, 
1 qt. of sifted flour or enough to make a soft sponge. 
Let rise again. Roll out, spread with a mixture of 
butter^,, sugar, and cinnamon, cut into strips and roll 
up from one end. Place in pans and let rise a third 
time, then bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. T. J. O'Neill. 



FUNNEL CAKES. 

1 qt. of flour, 3 eggs and a pinch of salt, 1 scant 
teaspoonful of baking powder, sweet milk enough 
to make it thin enough to run through a funnel. 
Swim them in hot lard. 

Mrs. M. J. Bowman. 

FUNNEL CAKES. 

1 pt. of sweet milk, 2 eggs well beaten, yolks and 
whites together, enough flour to make a thin batter 
\ teaspoonful baking powder, \ teaspoonful salt. 
Mix in a pan thoroughly. Place enough lard in a 
pan to cover the bottom. Let it get quite hot before 
cooking the batter. Now put the batter through a 
funnel into the hot lard, beginning at center of pan, 
and turning the stream around in a gradually en- 
larging circle, being careful not to ta ich so as to 
form a solid cake. Fry a light brown and serve hot 
with any tart jelly. 

Mrs. W. L. Glatfelter, 
Spring Grove, Pa. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 237 



PENNSYLVANIA MOLASSES CRUMB CAKE. 

2 cups brown sugar, 1 cup butter and lard mixed, 
3 cups flour, f cup New Orleans molasses, 1 cup hot 
water, 1 teaspoonful of soda. Mix sugar, flour and 
butter together, rubbing together with the hands 
into crumbs. Put molasses into separate vessel, and 
into it stir the soda and hot water. Put soda into 
cup and dissolve with a little water, before filling 
the cup to the full. Put pastry into deep pans, 
pour in the molasses mixture, and sprinkle the 
crumbs over the top, and bake at once in a mode- 
rate oven. M. Bertha Zieber. 

CRUMB PIE. 

1 cup New Orleans molasses, 1 cup warm water, 
1 teaspoonful soda, 3 cups flour, f cup brown sugar, 
| cup butter. Rub flour, sugar and butter together 
for crumbs. Dissolve soda in water, and mix with 
molasses, then § of the crumbs, pour into dishes 
that ha^e been lined with crust, and sprinkle the 
balance of crumbs on top. This will make 3 pies. 

Mrs. H. B. Baer. 

SCHMIER KASE. 

Set a vessel containing 1 qt. of thick milk on the 
front plate of the stove. When the milk has drawn 
about 1 pt. of whey, empty the contents of the 
vessel into a cheese cloth bag to drain. Remove the 
curd from the bag, add 1 teaspoonful of salt, and mix 
with a spoon until very smooth. .Now stir in suffici- 
ent sweet cream or milk to make the cheese of the 
desired consistency. Miss Angie Ruth. 

ZITTERLING (SOUSE). 

Scrape and wash 4 pig's feet. Cover with water 
and boil until the meat falls from the bones. Pick 
the meat from the bones, add 1 pt. of the liquor in 
which the feet have been coo zed, season with salt 
and pepper, and add vinegar to taste. Pour into a 
mold. Mrs. George Felty. 



♦ 



238 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



Candies 



CREAM CHOCOLATE. 

2 cups sugar, 3 cups flour, or 2\ cups flour and J 
cup cornstarch, 1 cup sweet milk, | lb. butter, whites 
of 5 eggs, 3 teaspoonfuls baking powder. Flavor with 
vanilla. Mrs. Sol. Hoke. 

CHOCOLATE CANDY. 

4 cups of brown sugar, J cake chocolate, 1 cup 
of hot water, scant | cup of butter. Boil until it will 
harden in water; stir as little as possible, pour into 
greased pans. Clarissa Reindollar. 

CARAMELS. 

1 cup molasses, 1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup white 
sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, lump of butter, \ cake 
chocolate. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

H lbs. of brown sugar, f cup of milk, \ cake of 
chocolate, butter size of hickory nut, boil until it 
balls in cold water. 

Mrs. H. W. Swartz. 
CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

2 cups molasses, 1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup milk, 
\ cake chocolate, butter size of egg, boil until it 
hardens in water, stirring all the time. 

Helen Young. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 239 



CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

1 lb. of brown sugar, one- third cup rich milk, 
butter size of walnut, 1 tablespoonful molasses, 1 
tablespoonful vinegar, \ cake chocolate. Stir while 
boiling. Boil until it hardens in cold water. After 
taking from, the fire, add 1 teaspoonful of vanilla, 
and beat well. Sue Y. Tanger. 

FUDGE. 

2 cups white sugar, | cup sweetmilk, a lump of 
butter size of walnut, \ of a 10c piece of chocolate. 
Boil 3 minutes, then beat on marble stone till light. 
Put in buttered dish and cut in squares. 

Mrs. Mary M. Wise. 

FUDGE. 

4 cups of white sugar, 2 cups of milk, butter size 
of an egg, J cake of chocloate. Add a few drops of 
vanilla. Mrs. 0. N. Anthony. 

FUDGE. 

2 cups brown sugar, 2 cups white sugar, 2 cups 
sweet milk, butter the size of a small egg, | cake 
of chocolate or 5 tablespoonfuls cocoa. Boil until 
it forms a soft ball in water, then beat on a marble 
slab or large meat plate. Add the vanilla while 
beating. Mrs. Arno M. Pfaff. 

FUDGE. 

2 cups brown sugar, 2 cups white, 1 cup sweet 
milk, | cake chocolate, a lump of butter; boil, beat 
until cold. Mrs. C. Anthony. 

FUDGE. 

2 lbs. of brown sugar, 1 cup of cream, a lump of 
butter, J lb. chocolate. Boil until it forms a ball in 
cold water. Remove from the fire and beat until 
it creams. M. Ethel Stamm. 



240 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



FUDGE. 

1 cup milk, 2 cups sugar, butter size of an egg or 
larger, J cake chocolate. Boil until it forms in water. 
Beat until stiff, then turn into buttered tins. Half 
cream and milk improves it. 



COLD FUDGE. 

1 lb. pulverized sugar, 1 egg, J cake chocolate, 
and 1 teaspoonful vanilla. Mix with milk until 
thin, then beat until stiff. Pour into buttered tins. 

Esther Redding. 

SULTANA FUDGE. 

Melt i cupful of butter in a sauce pan; then add 
2 cupfuls of granulated sugar; J cup sweet milk; 
| cup molasses; bring to a boiling point and let boil 
7 minutes. Then add 2 squares of grated unsweet- 
ened chocolate, let boil 9 minutes longer. Then 
remove from fire, flavor with vanilla, and add 5 cts. 
worth of ground peanuts; or English walnuts, broke 
in pieces, beat hard, then turn into buttered tins to 
cool. Cut in squares and serve. 

Mrs. C. M. Wolff. 
PEANUT BUTTER FUDGE. 

2 cups sugar (pulverized or granulated), 1 cup 
milk, 2 heaping tablespoonfuls peanut butter. 
Cook until it forms a ball in water, then take off 
the fire and beat until stiff. Pour into buttered 
tins and cut into cubes when cold. 

Esther Redding. 

PEANUT BUTTER FUDGE. 

2 cups granulated sugar, \ cup table molasses, 
I cup hot milk, pinch of salt. Boil three minutes 
after it begins to boil, stirring all the time. Tajce it 
off the stove and put in two tablespoonfuls of 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 241 



marshmallow whip, then add two tablespoonfuls 
(large) ofpeanut butter, and a lunp of butter the 
size of a large walnut. Beat until stiff enough to 
pour into buttered pans. Leave until next day and 
then score. Mrs. J. S. Moul. 

PEANUT BARS. 

2 cups granulated sugar, 4 tablespoonfuls good 
vinegar, \ cup water, butter the size of a walnut. 
Boil until the mixture drops from the spoon like wax. 
Add as many peanuts as you like, pour into buttered 
pans, and mark into bars. E. F. H. 

PEANUT BRITTLE. 

Shell and chop roasted peanuts to measure 1 pint " 
Put 2 lbs. granulated sugar into pan, and stir over 
fire. It will lump, then gradually melt. When pale 
coffee color, and clear, add nuts, pour quickly on 
buttered sheets. Roll thin as poissble. When cold 
break. Mrs. Henrietta Stahl. 

PEANUT CANDY. 

1 lb. soft white sugar, 2 lbs. brown sugar, 1 qt. N. 
0. molasses, 3 tablespoonfuls vinegar. Boil until it 
forms a soft ball in cold water. Add 25 cts. worth 
of ground peanuts, and beat until creamy. 

Mrs. J. C. Carey. 

CREAM DATES. 

Remove the stone from large dates and put in 
their place the following cream: 2 lbs. of 4X sugar, 
whites of 2 eggs, add grated cocoanut or any other 
desired flavor. Mrs. Bortner. 

STUFFED DATES. 

Select rich dark date, split one side and carefully 
r emove the stone. In its place put quarter of English 
walnut, dip in granulated sugar and arrange on plate. 

Mrs. Bortner. 



242 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



CREAMED DATES. 

Boil 2 cups granulated sugar to a soft ball. This 
may be known by pouring a little of the sugar in 
ice water and taking it between the fingers, if it will 
form into a soft ball it is ready. Then pour the sugar 
on a large platter, sprinkle over a little cold water, 
let it stand till'you can touch the sugar with the back 
of the hand, then stir it with a small wooden spoon 
until it is white and firm, then work it with the hands 
until it is soft and can be rolled into a ball. Remove 
the pits from some nice large dates, take a little of 
the sugar (fondant,) and put it in the date in place of 
the pit. Another way is to put a blanched almond 
in the date. Then put the foundant in a small low 
sauce pan, set it in a pan of water over the fire, add 
4 a teaspoonful vanilla, and 1 tablespoonful water, 
stir until dissolved, begin careful not to let the fond- 
ant boil, remove from fire, dip the dates in the melted 
fondant, and lay them on slightly buttered tins. 
In case the fondant should be too thick, add a little 
water, but be careful not to add too much. 

Mrs. F. M. Miller, New Oxford, Pa. 

COCOANUT BARS. 

2 cups sugar, § cup milk, cream tartar the size of 
a pea, boil until it forms a ball in water, add 1 cup 
shredded cocoanut, beat until white, turn into but- 
tered tins and mark in strips. 

Mrs. E. F. H. 
BUTTER SCOTCH. 

1 cup of molasses, 1 cup of sugar, \ cup of butter. 
Boil until brittle. 

Mrs. L. H. Hoffacker. 
VANILLA TAFFY. 

2 cups of sugar, \ cup of vinegar, f cup of water, 
butter the size of a small walnut. Boil without any 
stirring until it becomes hard in cold water, turn * 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 243 



on buttered plate, add 1 teaspoonful vanilla and pull 
soon as possible. Mrs. Bortner. 



CREAM MINTS. 

2 cups sugar, \ cup water, \ teaspoonful cream of 
tartar. Boil until it makes a soft ball when dropped 
into cold water. Pour slowly over beaten white of 
1 egg. Flavor with mint. Drop on wax paper. 

Mrs. Lula P. Stover. 



MINT CANDY. 

1 lb. granulated sugar, \ cup sweet milk, \ oz. 
butter. Put all ingredients on to boil until it will 
form a soft heap in cold water. Remove from fire 
and add 2 teaspoonfuls essence of peppermint. Beat 
till creamy and pour in pan, (buttered) to cool, or 
drop by teaspoonfuls on waxed paper. This latter 
way must be done quickly or the mixture will harden 
in kettle. Mrs. W. A. Korn. 



PINOCHE. 

2 lbs. brown sugar, f cup of milk or cream, \ 
lb. of butter, vanilla according to taste. Boil 5 
minutes till forms a soft ball in water; beat, then 
add 1 cup of ground peanuts or walnuts. 

Mrs. Mary M. Wise. 

PINOCHE. 

1 lb. brown sugar, \ cup sweet milk, \ oz. butter, 
} cup walnuts or shell barks. Pat sugar, milk, and 
butter on to boil till a small quantity will form a 
soft heap in cold water. Remove from fire and add 
1 teaspoonful of vanilla and the nuts. Beat till 
creamy and pour into buttered pans, cut into 
square's, when slightly cooled. 

Mrs. W. A. Korn. 



244 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



CANDIED ORANGE PEEL. 

1 cup of sugar to the peel of 2 oranges. Cut the 
peel into thin strips, and soak over night in strong 
salt water. Wash it well in 5 or 6 waters to remove 
the salt, and boil with sugar and \ cup of water, 
for about 10 miinutes, then beat until it sugars, 
each piece should be separated before it hardens. 

Miss Blanche Hostetter. 

MARSHMALLOWS. 

1 lb. of sugar dissolved in 8 tablespoonfuls of 
boiling water, \ pack of minute gelatine dissolved 
in 8 tablespoonfuls of boiling water, when dissolved 
pour together, and beat until stiff. Cut into squares 
and roll in pulverized sugar mixed with cornstarch. 
Add a teaspoonful of vanilla while beating. 

Mrs. C. E. Bortner. 

MARSHMALLOWS. 

1 lb. granulated sugar, \ pkg. gelatine, 1 teaspoon- 
ful vanilla. Put sugar and gelatine in separate pans 
and pour over each 8 tablespoonfuls of boiling water 
Dissolve well, then pour together and beat until 
stiff. Line a square pan with powdered sugar or 
cornstarch, and pour into it the mixture. Let stand 
until perfectly stiff, turn out and cut into squares. 

Gertrude Beard. 

BUTTER CREAMS. 

2 cups granulated sugar, 1 cup cold water. Let 
this dissolve slowly, stir with wooden spoon. When 
it comes to a boil put pinch of cream of tartar in it 
and don't stir again until finished. Use rag dijpped 
i n water to wash down sugar which forms around the 
side of pan. Let it come to a soft ball when dropped 
in cold water, then remove from fire. Pour out on 
platter and let stand until cold, then beat with 
wooden spoon until creamy. If it gets too hard to 
use put a damp cloth around it then take up in 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 245 



your hands and knead like bread. Work in butter 
to taste. Add vanilla before cream gets toohard. 
Form into small balls and let stand few minutes 
before coating with chocolate. Melt chocolate in 
double boiler and dip balls in one at a time, then 
use 2 forks to remove, drop on oil cloth or wax 
paper to harden. This fondant may be kept for 
weeks by putting in stone jar and keeping damp 
cloth on top. 

Rebekah Gitt. 

SEA FOAM. 

Take 1 pound of brown sugar, \ pound of white 
sugar, 1 scant cup water and the whites of 2 eggs . 
Put sugar and water into a pan and let it heat up 
slowly, stirring it frequently to hel^p dissolve the 
sugar. When the sugar is all dissolved let it come 
to boiling point and boil until it strings when drop- 
ped from a spoon. Then take it off the fire and let 
stand until it stops bubbling. Beat into the well 
beaten egg whites. Flavor with vanilla, and when 
it becomes stiff drop from spoon on buttered plates 
and cool. Nuts may be added before dropping. 

Mabel Maxwell, 

R. D. 5. 



246 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 

Beverages 



TEA. 

Put 5 teaspoonfuls tea into hot teapot, add 5 cups 
boiling water, let stand 5 min. to steep, pour off 
from grains and serve. 

CHOCOLATE. 

1 heaping tablespoonful of grated chocolate, 1 cup 
of hot milk, 1 cup of boiling water, put into a stew 
pan and toil 10 min., add sugar if desired. 

COFFEE. 

5 tablespconfuls of coffee, J egg, mix well, add 
2| cups cold water, let just boil up, then add 2| cups 
hot water, let just come to a boil and take from 
stove. Allow to stand 2 minutes, pour off from 
grounds, and serve. 

GRAPE JUICE, UNFERMENTED. 

Pick the grapes from the stems, wash and place 
in stew kettle. Barely cover with water. Boil till 
soft enough to strain. Place in bag and drain 
thoroughly. Strain 3 or 4 times to get the juice 
very clear. To each qt. of juice add J of a cup 
of sugar. Place in the kettle and let it come to a 
boil. Let boil 4 or 5 minutes. Bottle and seal while 
hot. Mrs. A. M. Heilman. 

GRAPE JUICE. 

10 lbs. of grapes, 1 lb. of loaf sugar, 2 pts. of water. 
Allow grapes to soften on slow fire, without water. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 247 



Drain through cheese cloth over night. In the morn- 
ing, add water and sugar, and boil \ hour. 

Mrs. H. N. Gitt. 

RASPBERRY VINEGAR. 

1 qt. of raspberries, 1 pt. of vinegar, Let stand 
over night, then strain; to each p\nt add 1 lb. of 
sugar, boil a few minutes, bottle and seal. 

Mrs. W. H. Sheffer. 

RAISIN TEA. 

1 lb. stoned raisins, 5 qts. water. Boil to 1 gal. 
and strain. M. R. Heinemann. 

TAPIOCA JELLY, BEVERAGE FOR SICK. 

Take of tapioca 2 spoonfuls, water 1 pt., boil 
gently for an hour or until assumes a jelly like ap- 
pearance, Add sugar, wine and nutmeg, with lemon 
juice to suit the taste of the patient, and the nature 
of the case. Mrs. G. T. Himes, 

New Oxford, Pa. 

FRUIT PUNCH. 

2 qts. hot water, 3 lemons,, 3 oranges, 1 pineapple 
or 1 can of pineapple, 1 tablespoonful of tea. Press 
the juice out of the lemons and oranges and put the 
rinds in a vessel with the tea, then pour the hot 
water over and let stand 15 minutes, then strain 
and add to the juice of the fruit which is sweetened 
to taste. Cut the pineapple in small pieces. When 
everything is cool add a large bottle of ginger ale. 

Mrs. Charles E. Royer, 

Westminster. 

CIRCUS PUNCH. 

1 orange, 2 lemons, § cup of apricot juice, J cup 
of prune juice, \ cup of cherry juice, (1 cup sugar, 
1 cup water, for syrup) pink coloring, 2 qts. of water. 



248 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



Make syrup of sugar and water, cool, add fruit 
juices to make one pint.^ Chill. Serve with ice 
and cherries. A pretty pink coloring may be ob- 
tained by using a vegetable colorijag. Allow to 
combine 10 minutes. Recipe makes 2J quarts. 

Mrs. T. J. Little. 

CIDER PUNCH. 

1 qt. of sweet cider, juice of 6 lemons, sugar to 
taste, the quantity depending upon the sweetness 
of the cider. Let these ingredients stand 3 or 4 
hours. Then add 1 qt. of charged water and a 
large piece of ice. Mrs. T. J. Little. 

A SIMPLE TEA PUNCH. 

Pour 2 cups of boiling water over 1 tablespoonful 
of English breakfast tea. Let stand 5 minutes and 
strain over 1 cup of sugar. When cool add one 
third cup of lemon juice, two- thirds cup of orange 
juice, 1 cup water, and just before serving 1 pint of 
ginger ale. Mrs. T. J. Little. 



MARSHMALLOW LEMONADE. 

To 1 cup water add the juice of 3 lemons, and the 
grated peel of \ lemon, 2 tablespoonfuls of sugar. 
Bottle the mixture. To serve put 4 tablespoonfuls 
in each glass. Fill the glass with ice water and add 

2 marshmallows cut in quarters. 

Mrs. T. J. Little. 

SPICED LEMONADE. 

Put in a sauce pan 1 cup of sugar, If cups of 
water, the rind of 1 lemon (pared off very thin), 

3 whole cloves, 1 inch stick cinnamon. Cook for 
5 minutes. Cool and add the juice of 3 lemons. 
Dilute with water and cracked ice. Sprigs of mint 
are an improvement. 

Mrs. T. J. Little. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 249 



RHUBARB FIZZ. 

Cut rhubarb into small pieces, selecting as pink 
a variety as possible. Put it into a sauce pan with 
1 qt. of cold water and cook until soft. Then strain 
through a cheese cloth, and add one-third cup or- 
ange juice, \ cup lemon juice, 1\ cups of sugar syrup. 
When ready to serve add 1 pt. of charged water. 

Mrw. T. J. Little. 

CRANBERRY SYRUP. 

6 qts. of cranberries, 4 qts. of water, sugar. Cook 
cranberries with water until soft. Strain through 
jelly bag. Add half as much sugar as juice. Boil 
5 minutes, skimming meanwhile. Bottle. Seal. 
1 tablespoonful of this added to a glass of ice water 
makes a refreshing drink. 

Mrs. T. J. Little. 



250 HANOVER COOK EOOK. 

Chafing Dish Recipes 



BOUILLON. 

2 teaspoonfuls of beef extract, \ teaspoonful of 
onion juice, 1 qt. of water, salt and white pepper, 
pinch of mace. Heat the water in blazer till it 
boils, add extract and seasoning. Serve in cups 
with saltines. 

CREAMED OYSTERS IN CHAFING DISH. 

1 pt. oysters, drained, 2 tablespoonfuls butter, 
1 cup rich milk, salt and pepper, 1 tablespoonful 
flour. Place butter in chafing dish without hot water 
pan, allow it to sizzle and brown, then add oysters. 
When they have drawn a juice sprinkle in the heaping 
tablespoonful flour, stirring constantly. Add milk 
and stir until the cream is smooth and oysters curled 
up. Be sure oysters are cooked through. Serve at 
once on small squares of toast. 

Aimee Wirt Winebrenner. 

BELLEVUE STEW. 

Melt 2 tablespoonfuls of butter, add 1 cup of 
celery cut into small pieces, 1 cupful of cream, and 
let cook until tender. Season and add 1 pt. oysters. 
Thicken with cracker crumbs. 

Mrs. H. S. ]hrhart. 

PANNED OYSTERS. 

Put sauce pan over a quick fire to heat, when 
hissing hot throw in the oysters and shake and stir 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 251 



until they boil, then add salt, pepper and a piece of 
butter the size of a large walnut. Serve immediately 
in a hot dish. 

WHITE SAUCE. 

1 tablespoonful of butter, 1 tablespoonful of flour, 
1 cup of milk, | teaspoonful of salt. White pepper. 
Melt the butter in blazer, add the flour and cook 
until smooth, then add the milk slowly. Cook until 
creamy, stirring all the time, now add the salt and 
pepper. Thick white sauce is made by using 2 table- 
spoonfuls flour to same quantity of nilk and butter. 

BROILED SWEETBREADS. 

1 pair sweetbreads, 1 tablespoonful butter, salt 
and white pepper. Parboil sweetbreads which have 
previously stood 1 hr. in ice water. Cut them length- 
wise, trim, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and dip in 
melted butter, lay in hot blazer and ccok a delicate 
brown. 

CR DAM DD CHICKEN. 

2 cups cold chicken cut into small pieces, 1 cup of 
chicken stock, 1 cup of milk or cream, 2 tablespoon- 
fuls of butter, 1 heaping tablespoonful of flour, salt 
and pepper. Cook the butter and flour together in 
the chafing dish. Add the stock and milk, and stir 
until smooth. Put in the chicken, salt and pepper, 
and cook 3 minutes longer. 

CALF'S LIVER AND BACON. 

The bacon and liver should be cut into thin slices 
Put the bacon into the chafing dish. When the fat 
is cooked draw the bacon to 1 side. After rolling in 
flour and peppering put in the liver and cook until 
brown and tender, turning often. Serve a slice of 
bacon with each piece of liver. 

DRIED BEEF. 

One-half lb. of dried beef, 2 tablespoonfuls butter, 
\ pt. of milk, 1 tablespoonful of flour, 1 egg. Put the 



252 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



butter into the chafing dish and add the beef. Fry 
until brown, then add the milk. Mix the flour with 
a little cold milk, then stir it into the meat. Add 1 
egg. Serve on toast. 

WELS I RAREBIT. 

1 lb. of chopped American cheese, § glass of milk, 
yolk of 1 egg, 1 teaspoonful of dry mustard, 1 tea- 
spoonful of Worcestershire sauce, a lump of butter, 
a dash of red, or 2 of black pepper, and perhaps a 
few drops of tabasco. If the cheese is fresh salt the 
above mixture. Into the chafing dish put a lump of 
butter. After it has simmered a bit, put in the cheese. 
Stir constantly, and gradually add the milk. When 
the cheese and milk are well blended, stir in above 
condiments, prepared as follows: To the yolk of an 
egg broken into a cup, add the dry mustard and Wor- 
cestershire sauce, red and black pepper, and tabas- 
co. Let the mixture have 1 more heating and pour 
over toast. 

WELSH RAREBIT. 

2 tablpspoonfuls flour, 1 tablespoonful butter 
1 cup cream, \ teaspoonful salt, \ teaspoonful mu- 
tard, \ teaspoonful pepper, 1 lb. rich cream cheese. 
Melt butter in pan without browning, stir in flour 
until smooth and frothy, add liquid 'slowly at first, 
stirring until smooth after each addition. (Caution — 
Stir the sauce thoroughly; a beginner will fail at this 
point.) Season. Add the cheese finely cut or ground. 
Stir continually now until the mixture becomes 
smooth. Serve cn toast or crackers. 

E. W. Ehrhart. 

LAMB CHOPS. 



Small lamb chops,|butter. salt. Rub inside of chaf- 
ing dish with butter. Let the dish get very hot so 
that it will at once sear the chops and prevent the 
escape of the juices. Turn them often while cooking. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 253 



Miscellaneous 



HOW TO RESTORE MILDEWED CLOTHES. 

A cure for mildew that is a remedy of an old negro 
laundress is excellent for all white goods, and wil 
not injure fine materials. Pour a quart of boiling 
water over 2 ounces of chloride of lime, add 3 
quarts of cold water, let the mixture stand until 
settled, strain, and it is ready for use. The material 
should be steeped in the limewater for a day or over 
night, when the spots will be found to have disap- 
peared. 

TO REMOVE SPLINTERS. 

When a splinter has been driven into the hand it 
can be extracted by steam. Fill a wide-mouthed 
bottle nearly full of hot water, place the injured 
pa :t over the mouth of the bottle and press it slight- 
ly. The action thus produced will draw the flesh 
down, and in a minute or two the steam will extract 
the splinter, also the inflammation. 

THE WEDDING ANNIVERSARY. 



Fifth year 

Tenth year 

Fifteenth year . . . 
Twentieth year . , 
Twenty-fifth year 
Thirtieth year. . . . 
Fortieth year . . . 

Fiftieth year 

Seventy-fifth year 



Wooden Wedding 

Tin Wedding 

Crystal Wedding 

China Wedding 

Silver Wedding 

Pearl Wedding 

Ruby Wedding 

Golden Wedding 

. . . . Diamond Wedding 



254 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



FOR HOARSENESS. 

Bake a lemon or a sour orange 20 minutes in a 
moderate oven. Open at one end and take out the 
inside, sweeten pulp with sugar or molasses. 

TO MAKE HARD WATER SOFT. 

Stir into 50 gallons of water \ pint freshly slacked 
lime, or J lb. borax. Mr. H. Frysinger. 

Chester, Pa. 

TO CLEAN BOTTLES. 

Put them into a kettle of cold water with some 
wood ashes and boil, then rinse in clean soft water. 

TO KILL MOTHS IN CARPETS. 

Wring a coarse cloth out of clean water, spread it 
smoothly on the part of the carpet where moths 
are suspected to be, and iron it with a hot iron. The 
steam will destroy the moths and eggs. 

TO CURE A STING OF BEE OR WASP. 

Bind on common baking soda dampened with 
water, or mix common earth with water to the con- 
sistency of mud. 

TO TAKE CINDERS FROM EYE. 

Place one or two grains of flax seed in the eye. 

DURABLE BLACK INK. 

1 drachm bi^hlorOmate potassium, 1 drachm 
prussiate potassium, 1 oz. extract logwood, 4 pts 
lukewarm rainwater. When the ingredients are 
thoroughly dissolved, the ink is ready for use. If it 
gets too thick add more water. 

Mr. H. Frysinger, 
Chester, Pa. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 255 



HOUSEHOLD HINTS. 

To remove fruit stains pour boiling water over 
them before washing. 

To clean porcelain tubs, etc., use a little gasoline 
on a flannel cloth. 

Coal oil on a soft flannel cloth will brighten nickle 
and tin; will keep basin and bathtub free of water 
marks and will remove finger marks from woodwork. 
A tablespoonful of coal oil in 1 quart of warm water 
will remove fly specks from brass fixtures. 

FOR DYSPEPSIA. 

One-half oz. pulv. rhubarb, \ oz. calumba root, 
| oz. camomile flower, § oz. gentian root, 2 scruples 
salt of tartar, 2 scruples cardamon seeds. Mix in 
pure brandy, let stand 7 days before using. Dose — 
1 teaspoonful 3 times a day before eating. 

Mrs. Catharine A. Brough. 

BLOOD MEDICINE. 

5c worth sarsaparilla bark, 5c worth of sweet wood, 
5c worth yellow dock; add 1 quart of water and boil 
down to a pint, using an agate or stone vessel (well 
covered). Dose for an adult, one teaspoonful 4 
times a day, one before each meal and one on re- 
tiring at night. Mrs. Nevin Fry. 

TO RID THE KITCHEN OF FLIES. 
Pour on a red h >t shovel a few drops of carbolic 
acid, having previously closed all windows and doors. 

TO PRESERVE BROOMS. 

Dip brooms in boiling hot water occasionally 
to make them tough. 

ADDITIONAL MISCELLANEOUS HINTS. 

Granite ware should not be left to dry over a 
hot fire, as the heat in expanding, may cause the 
outside to scale. 



256 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



A small dish of charcoal placed in your meat 
larder will keep the articles sweet and whole- 
some. 

Charcoal is a splendid disinfectant. 

Cotton crepe cut into 1 yard lengths makes 
serviceable dish towls. They do not lint and give 
a fine polish to glass ware. 

Before cleaning fish, dip them in hot water, and 
the scales will be very easily removed. 

For applying tonic to the scalp, fill a small oil 
can with the tonic, part the hair in strands and 
apply the tonic directly to the scalp. 

To clean steel on oven doors, rub briskly while 
the steel is warm with a soft cloth dipped in vinegar. 

To clean a rusty gas oven, saturate a woolen 
cloth with linseed oil, and rub over the entire oven 
till the rust disappears. Then rub with a clean 
dry cloth. Wash the burners and racks in hot 
washing soda, and suds; turn on the oven burners 
and dry out the range well before turning them off. 
Do this once a month and the range will last longer 
and bake better. 

Shoe leather stains on white stockings may be 
removed by applying oxolic acid, diluted with water, 
in the proportion of half an ounce of acid to a pint 
of water. Rinse and repeat until the stain is gone. 
Wash afterwards, very thoroughly. 

In purchasing canned goods examine the cans 
carefully, and if the sides bulge outside, reject 
them, as this denotes the presence of gas which 
renders the contents unfit for food. 

To make silk stockings wear longer, darn the 
heel and toes before wearing. The darning will 
wear off first, and then can be pulled out and re- 
darned. 

To prevent custard from curdling, put the cus- 
tard cups into a pan half filled with cold water, 
instead of hot. The custard will heat more gradually 
and it will be firm without a drop of whey. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 257 



TO REMOVE STAINS. 

INK. — While an ink stain is fresh take warm 
milk and saturate the stain; let stand a few hours, 
then apply more fresh milk; rub it well and it will 
soon disappear. If the ink has become dry, use salt 
and vinegar. 

To take out grass stains, wash in alcohol and 
rinse in clear water, if possible, while the stain is 
fresh. Or use ammonia and water. 

To remove tobacco stains from copper or brass 
ash-trays, apply a little denatured alcohol with a 
brush. 

Coffee, tea, fruit. — Pour boiling water through 
the stained portion of the cloth which is held tight- 
ly over a bowl. Javelle water may be used later if 
the stain is persistent. 

Chocolate. — Apply paste of borax and cold 
water. Let this remain for a short time. Rinse off 
and apply boiling water as outlined for tea stains. 

Grease. — Wash article in soap and moderately 
hot water. Javelle water may be used if stains are 
persistent. 

Candle Wax. — Put a sheet of white blotting 
paper under the stain and one over. Apply a hot 
iron. If color remains soak in denatured alcohol 
for a few minutes. 

Grass Stain. — Wash stain in kerosene. 

Iodine. — Rub stain with starch before washing. 

Iron Rust. — Apply table salt and lemon juice to 
stain. Hold over steam. 

Mildew. — Wash stain in cold water or, if very 
bad, in Javelle water. 



258 HAXOYER COOK BOOK. 



Wagon Grease, Machine Grease, Tar. — Apply 
lard to stain. Wash in soap and moderately hot 
water. 

JAVELLE WATER. 

Put 1 lb. washing soda in an enameled or agate 
pan, add 1 qt. boiling water. In a similar utensil 
put J lb. of chloride of line, add 2 qts. cold water. 
Stir. Let stand over night. Pour clear liquid into 
the soda solution. Bottle. Store in a dark place. 
Use solution with equal amount of hot water. 
Javelle water may be used on white or unbleached 
cottons or linens but MUST NOT be used on col- 
ored cottons or linens or any piece of silk or woolen. 

ANTIDOTES FOR POISOX. 

For poisons which cause an instantaneous sensa- 
tion of burning in the throat or stomach, drink a 
teacupful of sweet oil, or lard or grease of any kind, 
and afterward, if vomiting occurs, about the same 
quantity of magnesia water or soap-suds. 

For poisons which are gradual or cause drowsiness, 
take an emetic first, that is, a teacupful warm water, 
into which has been stirred a large teaspoonful each 
of salt and ground mustard, every five minutes. 
After one or two effective vomits, drink a cup or 
two of strong coffee. 

For arsenic, creosote, verdigris, corrosive subli- 
mate, etc., swallow a couple of raw eggs, or at least 
he whites of them. Mr. H. Frysinger, 

Chester, Pa. 

TREATMENT FOR RUSTY GAS OVEX. 

Take all removable parts out, saturate a woolen 
cloth with linseed oil, and rub over the entire oven 
until all rust disappears. Then give a final rubbing. 
Do the same with the out side of the range, going 
over every thing but the burners; wash the burners, 
which are removable, and the racks in hot washing 
soda and suds; turn on the oven burners and dry 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 259 



out the range well before turning them off.^ All 
traces of oil will be gone and you will be astonished 
at the change. Do this once a month and your 
range will last longer and bake better. A new gas 
stove may be kept clean by rubbing it inside and out 
every other week with a cloth dipped in kerosene. 



CEMENT. 

9 oz. rosin, 1 oz. shellac, \ oz. beeswax; melt 
altogether. Mrs. C. Anthony. 

TOOTH WASH. 

1 oz. arrow root, 1 oz. Puruvian bark. 

Mrs. Catharine Brough. 



TO LOOSEN A COUGH. 

3 tablespoonfuls of flax seed boiled well in 1 quart 
of water, and strained, then add the juice of 3 lemons, 
1 pound of loaf sugar. Dose, 1 tablespoonfu 3 
times a day. Mrs. Nevin Frey. 



HOP COUGH SYRUP. 

3 cups boiling water, 1 handful of hops, 1 handful 
chestnut leaves; boil it down to If cups, then add 
\\ cups brown sugar and boil it to a syrup. 

Mrs. A. R. Brodbeck. 

COUGH SYRUP. 

1 quart of water, \ handful horehound, boil down 
to pint, strain, add \\ cups brown sugar, boiling to 
a syrup, then add 2 tablespoonfuls glycerine and 
essence of peppermint. Dose for adult, 1 teaspoonf ul 
5 or 6 times a day. 

N. A. Grbroecht. 

Altoona, Pa. 



260 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



COUGH SYRUP. 

1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup vinegar, 1 cup grated 
horse-radish. Take 1 teaspoonful before each meal 
and before going to bed. Keep air tight. 

Mrs. L. B. Sprenkle. 

COUGH SYRUP. 

Double handful horehound, double handful wild 
cherry bark, put in 1 gallon water, boil down § and 
strain. Then add | lb. rock candy, 1 lb. white 
sugar, 1 piece of best licorice, 1 pint best baking 
molasses. Boil all together till like syrup. Boil in 
stone or earthen ware. If patient is nervous, add 
a little boneset. 

Mrs. Catharine A. Brough. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 261 



CARE OF THE BABY AND COOKERY FOR 
THE SICK. 



FIRST AIDS. 

Earache. First, drop warmed sweet oil into 
the ear. Test your own ear first to insure its not 
being too hot. 

Second, rest the affected side on a hot water bag. 
m Colic. An attack of colic is best relieved, by- 
giving sips or teaspoonful doses of quite hot water. 
A soda mint tablet dissolved in one ounce hot 
water, and given in teaspoonful doses every five 
minutes will relieve many cases. Discontinue food 
temporarily and give water only. 

Convulsions. While awaiting the doctor, place 
the baby in a warm bath, and rub the body vigor- 
ously while in the bath. If mustard is at hand, add 
two teaspoonfuls to the water. Give the baby an 
enema as soon as possible, and as soon as he can 
swallow give two teaspoonfuls of castor oil. For a 
few days a greatly reduced diet should be given. 

Buttons, etc., swallowed by children are rarely 
of great harm. Do not give a laxative, but feed the 
child on oatmeal, potato, cornmeal, mush, sub- 
stances which will coat the object swallowed, so 
that it cannot perforate the walls of the intestines. 

Hiccoughs. Can be cured by taking a mouthful 
of water, pressing inward the tragus (the little 
protection in front of the ear) and then swallowing 
the water. This has never been known to fail. 

Prickly heat. Give sponge baths of bicar- 
bonate of soda, (common cooking soda) one table- 
spoonful to two quarts of water. Do not rub if 
the skin is dry. With a powder composed of equal 
parts of starch and oxide of zinc obtained at the 



262 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



drug store, dust the skin thoroughly several times 
a day. 

Croup. Call a doctor at once, but while wait- 
ing for him, give the child a teaspoonful of syrup 
of Ipecac; and if vomiting does not occur, repeat 
the dose in fifteen minutes. 

DONT'S 

Do not give the baby a pacifier. 

Do not give soothing syrups or paregoric. 

Do not give patent cough medicines. 

Do not allow flys to rest on a feeding bottle. 

Do not neglect the cleaning of bottle and nipple. 

Do not feed baby at irregular intervals. 

Do not fail to protect baby from flies and mos- 
quitoes. Mosquito netting is quite inexpensive. 

Do not kiss the baby or allow others to do so. 

Children with poor appetites should not be 
allowed to eat between meals, nor should they be 
given sweets. 

Never prepare the baby's food before thoroughly 
cleansing the hands. 

Babies, like plants, cannot thrive without air 
and sunshine. 

COOKERY FOR THE SICK. 

Kinds of invalid diet. — In the feeding of in- 
valids there are four grades of diet recognized, 
besides the so-called special or restricted diets 
which are required in dealing with such diseases as 
diabetes, various forms of digestive diseases, and 
others in which the diet is the most important fea- 
ture of the treatment. 

1. Fluid or liquid diet. 

2. Semi-solid diet. 

3. Light diet. 

4. Regular or "full" diet. 

Fluid diet. — For patients on fluid or liquid diets,- 
such foods as the following, are included: beef -tea, 
beef-juice, chicken broth, mutton broth, gelatine 
ice cream, and water ices, barley water, cocoa, al- 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



263 



bumen water, certain forms of strained gruel, 
buttermilk, and milk served in its natural state, or 
in its almost numberless combinations that vary 
the flavor. 

Semi-solid Diet. — For patients on semi-solid 
diet, such foods are suitable as oatmeal gruel, or 
well cooked cereals, custards, egg nogs, blanc mange, 
rice, tapioca, sago, prune or apple whips, milk- 
toast, soft-boiled eggs and bread and milk — these 
in addition to the foods mentioned in the liquid 
diet list. 

Light Diet. — For patients on light diet such 
additions are made as bread, crackers, toasts, 
some fruits, certain kinds of fish such as oysters, 
clams, and the white-fleshed fishes, poultry, and 
game, all meals being served in small quantities. 

Regular diet may include any of the above ar- 
ticles with beef, mutton and other meats added, 
certain vegetables, and all fruits. 

Always prepare food for the sick in the neatest 
and most careful manner. In sickness the senses 
are unusually acute, and far more susceptible to 
carelessness, negligence, and mistakes in the pre- 
paration and serving of food than when in health. 

Corn Meal Gruel. — Mix 1 tablespoonful corn 
meal, \ teaspoonful salt, and 2 tablespoonfuls cold 
water. Add 1 pint boiling water, simmer slowly 
1 hour. In serving bowl put 2 tablespoonfuls 
cream, 1 lump sugar, strain in gruel, stir for a mo- 
ment and serve. 

Flour and arrowroot gruel is made in the same 
way, but cooked only 10 minutes. 

Farina gruel is made with milk and cooked 1 
hour in a double boiler. 

Boil oatmeal gruel 1 hour and strain. 

Barley Water. — Wash 2 tablespoonfuls pearl 
barley, scald with boiling water, boil 5 minutes, 
strain. Add 2 quarts cold water, simmer till re- 
duced |. Strain, add lemon juice to taste. Good 
in fevers. 

Beef Tea. — Chop very fine 1 pound lean beef 
round. Cover with J pint cold water. Stand 
in cold place 1 hour. Set over hot water, stir till 



264 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



liquid BEGINS to turn color. Strain, add pinch 
salt. To reheat, set cup in pan of hot water. 

Sunshine Orange. — Soak an orange in hot water 
for half an hour or so, until it is heated to the core. 
The skin will loosen and come off like a glove, and 
the pulp will be sweet with the sweetness that comes, 
not from the sugar, but from the sun. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 265 



Fireless Cooker 



REMARKS. 

I. Any food that can be cooked in water or by 
steam can be cooked to perfection in the Fireless 
Cooker. 

II. The best results are accomplished when the 
kettles are full of boiling hot food, and tightly cov- 
ered. 

III. If a small amount of food is to be cooked, 
it may be put into a small utensil, which can be 
placed inside the kettle and surrounded with water. 
Place it on the stove and allow to boil a moment 
before placing in cooker. 

IV. Or the food may be placed in the kettle and 
taken from the cooker and reheated at least once 
during the cooking. 

V. In cooking meat — such as pot roasts or a 
ham, it is necessary that it be allowed to boil on the 
stove until the centre of the meat is heated to the 
boiling point. 

VI. It does not injure vegetables or meats to be 
left in cooker longer than time given. 

VII. A brick of ice cream may be placed in the 
cooker and it will remain firm for hours. 

VIII. Always place the eover on the kettle while 
the food is boiling, and a few moments before the 
kettle is placed in the cooker, tighten the clamps so 
that the air space over the food may be filled with 
steam. 

IX. Place the kettle in cooker immediately after 
it is taken from stove. 



266 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



TABLE FOR BOILING CEREALS. 

Scotch Oatmeal — -1 rounded teaspoonful salt to 

1 cup cereal, 4 cups water to 1 cup of cereal, boil 
20 minutes before putting in cereal, leave in cooker 
3 to 6 hours or all night; Rolled Oats — 1 rounded 
teaspoonf ul salt to 1 cup of cereal, If cups of water 
to 1 cup of cereal, boil 5 minutes before putting in 
cooker, leave in cooker 2 to 4 hours or all night; 
Rice — 1 rounded teaspoonful salt to 1 cup of cereal, 
2\ cups of water to 1 cup of cereal, boil 10 minutes 
before putting in cooker, leave in cooker 2 to 4 hours 
or all night; Cornmeal — 1 rounded teaspoonful salt 
to 1 cup of cereal, 4 cups of water to 1 cup of cereal, 
boil 10 minutes before putting in cooker, leave in 
cooker 3 to 6 hours or all night; Hominy — 1 rounded 
teaspoonful of salt to 1 cup of cereal, 4 cups of water 
to 1 cup of cereal, boil 10 minutes before putting in 
cooker, leave in cooker 6 to 10 hours or all night; 
Wheaten Grits — 1 rounded teaspoonful of salt to 1 
cup of cereal, 3 cups of water to 1 cup of cereal, 
boil 10 minutes before putting in cooker, leave in 
cooker 2 to 4 hours or all night; Farina — 1 rounded 
teaspoonful of salt to 1 cup of cereal, 3} cups of water 
to 1 cup of cereal, boil 10 minutes before putting in 
cooker, leave in cooker 2 to 4 hours or all night. 

TABLE FOR BOILING VEGETABLES. 

Cover potatoes with boiling water, 1 round table- 
spoonful salt, boil 10 minutes and leave in cooker 

2 hours or longer; Asparagus (tied in bundles)-—- 
Cover with boiling water, teaspoonful salt, boil 
5 minutes and leave in cooker 2 hours or longer ; 
Cauliflower— cover with boiling water, 1 teaspoonful 
salt, boil 10 minutes and leave in cooker 2 hours or 
longer; Corn — Cover with boiling water, 1 table- 
spoonful salt, boil 5 minutes and leave in cooker 
2 hours or longer; Carrots — Cover with boiling 
water, 1 teaspoonful salt, boil 10 minutes and leave 
in cooker \\ hours or longer; Beets — Cover with 
boiling water, 1 teaspoonful salt, boil 10 minutes 
and leave in cooker 2 hours or longer; Cabbage — 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 267 



Cover with boiling water, 1 teaspoonful salt, boil 
10 minutes and leave in cooker 3 hours or longer; 
Turnips — Cover with boiling water, 1 teaspoonful 
salt, boil 10 minutes and leave in cooker 2 hours 
or longer; Parsnips — -Cover with boiling water, 1 
teaspoonful salt, boil 10 minutes and leave in cooker 
2 hours or longer; Sweet potatoes — Cover with 
boiling water, 1 tablespoonful salt, boil 10 minutes 
and leave in cooker 3 hours or longer; Spinach- 
Cover with boiling water, 1 teaspoonful salt, boil 
5 minutes and leave in cooker 1 hour or longer; 
Macaroni — 2 qts. of boiling water to \ lb., 1 table- 
spoonful salt, boil 10 minutes and leave in cooker 
2 hours or longer; Onions — Cover with boiling water, 
1 tablespoonful salt, boil 5 minutes and leave in 
cooker 3 to 4 hours. 

TABLE FOR BOILING MEATS. 

Corned Beef — Cover with cold water, boil 20 min- 
utes and leave in cooker 6 hours or longer; Ham — ■ 
Cover with cold water, boil 20 minutes and leave 
in cooker 6 hours or longer; Tongue — Cover with 
cold water, boil 20 minutes and leave in cooker 6 
hours or longer; Leg Mutton— Cover with boliing 
water, boil 20 minutes and leave in cooker 3| hours or 
longer; Fresh Beef — Cover with boiling water, boil 
20 minutes and leave in cooker 3| hours or longer; 
Chicken — Cover with boiling water, boil 20 minutes- 
and leave in cooker 2 hours or longer. 

BROWN SOUP STOCK. 

4 lbs. soup meat and bone, 1 onion, 1 tablespoonful 
salt, \ teaspoonful pepper, 2| qts. water, 1 carrot, 
\ bay leaf, 1 turnip, 1 stalk celery. Wipe meat and 
cut into inch cubes. Brown about one-third of meat 
in frying pan with a little of the suet and onion. 
Place bone and remaining meat in kettle, add 2 qts. 
cold water and allow to stand 1 hr. Add 2 cups of 
water to meat in frying pan, allow to boil a minute 
and add to kett.le Add seasoning and diced carrots 



268 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



and turnips. Bring to boiling point and allow to 
simmer 10 min., place in cocker 8 hrs., cool and skim 
fat from top before using. 

VEGETABLE SOUP. 

2 cups brown soup stock, 2 cups tomato juice, 1 
cup carrots, 1 cup turnips, 1 cup diced potatoes, 

1 onion, \ cup celery, 1 cup peas, seasoning. To the 
soup stock and tomato juice add the carrots, turnips, 
onions and celery which have been cut into small 
pieces. Boil s owly for 10 minutes and then place in 
cooker 4 hrs. and add diced potatoes, peas and sea- 
soning. Boil 5 minutes and return to cooker for 
an hour longer. 

BOILED WHITE FISH. 

Clean and bone fish and sew in cheesecloth bag, 
leaving room for fish to swell. Place fish in kettle 
with back down, cover with boiling water salted; 
allowing 1 tablespoonful of salt and vinegar or lemon 
juice to each quart of water. Boil 5 minutes. Place 
in cooker for 1 hour. If fish weighs over 2 lbs. boil 
10 minutes. The skin may be easily peeled from a 
boiled fish. Serve with tomato sauce. 

CHICKEN STEW. 

Clean chicken and cut into small pieces. Place in 
kettle and cover with water. Allow to boil slowly 
for 30 minutes; season with salt and pepper, and 
place in cooker for 6 hours. Remove from cooker and 
add thickening. Serve on toast, or the stew may 
again be brought to the boiling point and dumplings 
added, and the kettle replaced in the cooker 30 min. 

CAULIFLOWER. 

Remove outside leaves from cauliflower and place 
in cold water, allow to remain \ hour. Place in ket- 
tle and cover with boiling water, add 1 teaspoonful 
of salt and boil slowly 5 minutes, place in cooker for 

2 hours. Drain and serve with white sauce. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 269 



BOILED POTATOES. 

Wash and pare potatoes. Cut into pieces of uni- 
form size, cover with boiling salted water, and boil 
5 minutes. Place in cooker for 1 hour to 2 hours 
depending on size of pieces and amount in kettle 
drain, wash, add salt, pepper, milk and butter. 
Beat until smooth. 

BOILED RICE 

1 cup rice, 5 cups water, 2 teaspoonfuls salt. Clean 
and wash rice, then stir into boiling salted water, 
and allow to boil 5 minutes. Place kettle in cooker 
and allow to remain 3 hours. It may be left over 
night without over cooking. 

DRIED PEACHES. 

Wash peaches in co d water. Drain and cover 
with cresh water, allow to soak over night, boil 
slowly for 10 minutes in water in which they were 
soaked. Add sugar to taste and place in cooker for 
4 hours. Serve cold. 

STEAMED GRAHAM BREAD. 

1 qt. graham flour, 1 teaspoonful salt, 1 level tea- 
spoonful soda, \ cup molasses, sour milk. Sift salt 
and soda with flour, mix thoroughly, add molasses 
and sour milk enough to make a stiff batter. Beat 
well and fill well-buttered mold or cans not more 
than one-half or two-thirds full. Place in kettle 
of boiling water, allowing water to come almost to 
the top of molds. Boil 10 minutes if molds are 
smal and 15 minutes if large. Remove kettle to 
cooker without jarring. Leave in cooker 3 hours. 
Remove bread from molds, brush with melted butter 
and place in hot oven until brown. 

FIG PUDDING. 

1 cup sugar, \ cup butter, \ cup water, two and 
one-third cups flour, \ cup figs, chopped fine, 1 level 



270 HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



teaspoonful baking powder, whites of 4 eggs. Cream 
butter, add sugar gradually, sift baking powder 
with flour, and add milk and flour alternately,- add 
figs and fold in whites of eggs. Pour mixture into 
buttered molds, place molds in kettle and add 
boiling water until it comes to top of molds. Boil 
15 minutes and place in cooker 2 hours. Serve with 
hard sauce. 

TO CAN STRAWBERRIES. 

Crush J of the berries selected for canning and put 
them into a preserving kettle with 1 pt. of sugar and 
1 cup of water for each qt. of fruit, let it come grad- 
ually to boiling point, then remove skum and strain. 
Fill glass jars with the remaining berries and set in 
kettle of cooker with a little hot water in bottom. 
Fill cans of fruit with the strained syrup and screw 
on tops loosely, after cans are filled, add hot water 
to the kettle until it comes nearly to the top of cans, 
put m the cover and boil 20 minutes, pack in the 
cooker and let it remain there until cold, then remove 
the cans, tighten the caps and keep in a cool, dry, 
dark closet. 

ROASTING AND BAKING. 

Cookers provided with radiators for baking and 
roasting have proven most satisfactory. The food is 
made in the usual way, and baked or roasted as if in 
the old-fashioned stove oven. With this difference 
the food will not burn. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 271 



SHREDDED CODFISH BALLS. 

Mix with one cup hot mashed potatoes (unseason- 
ed) i cup BEARDSLEY'S SHREDDED COD- 
FISH, just as it conies in the box; or if too salt satu- 
rate in cold water (do not soak) and squeeze dry. 
Add to this one small egg and a speck of pepper, 
beating all till light and creamy. Shape, roll in dry 
bread crumbs, dip in beaten egg, which has one 
tablespoonful of milk added to it, then in crumbs 
again. Place in frying basket, fry in deep, hot fat, 
just below the smoking point, till a rich brown. 
Drain on brown paper. Garnish with parsley. 



SHREDDED CODFISH ON THE HALF SHELL. 

Bake six smooth, clean potatoes of equal size. 
Cut in halves, lengthwise and without breaking the 
skin. Scoop out the potato into a hot bowl. Mash 
and add one cup BEARDSLEY'S SHREDDED 
CODFISH wrung out of hot water, two tablespoon- 
fuls of butter, one-quarter cup of hot cream or milk. 
Salt and cayenne pepper to taste. Cut fine four 
hard-boiled eggs and add to the potatoes. Fitt the 
shells with this mixture, heaping them up a little 
above the edge. Grate cheese over the top and add 
a little more pepper. Bake until hot and brown and 
serve very hot. You can brush the tops with white 
of egg before you grate the cheese if you wish them 
to look extra well. E. 0. E., Pa. 



SHREDDED CODFISH WITH MACARONI. 

Boil one-third package of macaroni for twenty 
minutes, drain, put into a pudding dish, dusting a 
third of a box BEARDSLEY'S SHREDDED 
CODFISH through it; add enough milk to almost 
cover it, dust cracker crumbs over top; beat two 
eggs very light, add half cup milk, pour over all 
and bake half an hour. Serve hot. 



272 



H AX OVER COOK BOOK. 



SHREDDED CODFISH SOUFFLE. 

Put one cupful of stale bread crumbs and a half 
cup of milk over the fire and stir constantly until 
boiling hot. Take from the fire, add the yolks of 
two eggs, one-quarter teaspoonful salt the same of 
pepper. Xow stir into this one cupful of BEARD - 
SLEY'S SHREDDED CODFISH. When well 
mixed, stir in carefully the whites of two eggs, 
beaten to a stiff froth, put quickly into a baking 
dish, bake in a quick oven five minutes or until 
golden brown. Serve at once. The sourne is very 
conveniently served when baked in individual 
dishes. China or paper cases may be used. 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



273 



Index 



Almonds, Salted or raosted. . 227 
Apples 

Brown Betty 143 

Baked ...63, 140 

Butter 231 

Custard pie 163 

Float 140 

Fritters 63 

Rice 133 

Sauce cake. ..." 172 

Stuffed with nuts 140 

Tapioca . '. 133 

Waldorf salad 90 

Winter salad 90 

Ash bolton puddifag 142 

Asparagus salad 87 

Asparagus Soup 13 

Asparagus Vinegarette 87 

Baby, Care of 261 

Bacon, Southern style 49 

Bean soup 9 

Beans 

Baked 72 

Boston baked 72 

Escalloped with corn 71 

Li)ma 71 

To can 216 

Beef 

Brownies 52 

Cannelon 51 

Dried 251 

Loaf 55 

Patties 54 

Pot roast 55, 230 

Roll 54 

Roll rollardin 231 

Beefsteak, Baked 51, 52 

Beefstead, French ba^ed. ... 52 

Beet sajad . . 87 

Beets, Boiled with white 

sauce 73 

Beets, With dressing 72 

Beverages 246-249 

Chocolate 246 

Cider punch 248 

Circus punch 247 

Coffee 246 

Cranberry syrup 249 

Fruit punch 237 

Grape juice . 246 

Marshmallow lemonade. . 248 
Raisin tea 247 



Raspberry vinegar 247 

Rhubarb fizz 249 

Spiced lemonade 248 

Tapioca jelly (for sick). . . 247 

Tea 246 

Tea punch 248 

Biscuits 

Butter 117 

Cream 117 

Drop 117 

Maple 118 

Maryland 118 

Soda 118 

Biscuits, See also Cinnamon 
cake, Coffee cake, Muffins, 
Pop overs, Rolls, Sally 
Lunn, Scones, Tea cake, 
Waffles. 

Bisque ice cream 226 

Boston baked beans 72 

Boston brown bread 109 

Bread 107 

Baking, Time for 107 

Boston brown 109 

Bran 110 

Brown 109 

Corn, See Corn meal bread 

Graham 107, 110 

How to bake 107 

How to cut hot 107 

Light cinnamon 115 

Nut 110 

Raisin 108 

Rye 109 

Sweet potato 108 

White 108 

Bread, See also Biscuit , Cin- 
namon cake, Coffee cake, 
Rolls, Scones, Sally Lunn. 

Bread cake 135 

Brown Betty 143 

Buns, See Rolls. 

Butter, How to cut 107 

Cabbage 

Creamed 73 

Hot slaw 231 

Pickle 98 

Salad 85, 86 

Sauerkraut 228 

Stuffed 73 

With boiled dressing 86 



274 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



Cake ,. 170-201 

Almond 172 

Ambrosia 193. 

Angel 186, 187 

Anonymous 192 

Apple sauce . 172 

Baking, Time for 170 

Barker 193 

Blitz Torte 194 

Bread 135 

Bride 193 

Buckeye loaf 193 

Caramel 194 

Chocolate 172, 173, 174 

Cinnamon 114, 120, 121 

Chocolate 172, 173, 174 

Cinnamon 114, 120, 121 

Citron 195 

Cocoa 174 

Cocoanut 175, 176 

Coffee 175 

Coffee fruit 175 

Coffee, Moravian 114 

Cream 195 

Cream chocolate 173, 174 

Cream sponge 174 

Currant 196 

Delicate 194 

Delicibus 196 

Devil 176-178 

Dover 196 

Dundee 196 

Feather 197 

Federal '. . . 197 

Fig 197 

Float . . . . 198 

Fruit. 179, 180, 181 

Garfield 193 

Ginger, See Ginger bread 
and cakes. 

Gold 181, 182 

Hickory nut 182, 183 

Hot milk 193 

Howard loaf 198 

Ice Cream 183 

Irish pound 187 

Jellt roll . . . . 198 

Johnnie s birthday 198 

Kaiser 198 

Lady . 199 

Lady Baltimore 184 

Lake George 199 

Layer 178, 

182, 184, 185, 192, 194, 199 

Lemon 185 

Log cabin. . . .". 199 

Log cabin... 199 



Maraschino cherry 195 

Marble 185, 186 

Marshm allow 184 

Midnight . 178 

Mock lady 199 

Moravian coffee 114 

Mountain ash 191 

Neapolitan 200 

Nine minute 200 

No egg 200 

Nothing 200 

One egg. . 192, 200 

Orange 187 

Pound 188 

Prune 197 

Queen 201 

Raisin 181 

Rose 201 

Scripture 201 

Shellbark and raisin 183 

Spice 171 

Sponge 189 

Sponge, Boiled 190 

Sponge, Cold water 189 

Sponge, Cream . 174 

Sponge, Hot milk 190 

Sunshine 188 

Taylor 201 

Tea 121, 201 

Tilden 201 

Variety 192 

Walnut loaf 182 

Wellesley 195 

Whipped cream. . 184 

White 190 

White fruit 181 

White mountain 191 

Yellow 192 

Cake, See also Shortcake 

Cakes, Small 202 

Almond crackers 209 

Bachellor buttons 206 

Bride 208 

Butter 208 

Caraway jumbles 203 

Chocolate 208 

Cocoanut cakes 204 

Cookifes ', 204 

Crackers 204 

Jumbles 203 

Squares 204 

Crackers with nuts 207 

Cup 196 

Drop 205,206 

Drop cugar cookies 206 

Emma 209 

French crackers 202 



HANOVER COOK BOOK 



275 



Ginger, See Ginger bread 
and cakes 

Graham crackers 207 

Gramdna s molasses. 211 

Hermits 208 

Jumbles 203 

Kisses . 204, 205 

Ladies' fingers 208 

Lemon crackers 209 

Marxhmallow and butter 

thins 207 

Molasses 211 

Nut 207, 208 

Oat flake macaroons 210 

Oatmeal crackers 209 

Peach kernel 207 

Pepper nuts. . . . 208 

Rolled oats cookies 210 

Rolled oats wafers 210 

Sand tarts 202 

Sugar cakes 205, 206 

Cookies 206 

Wafers 209 

Walnut kisses 204 

Candle wax, To remove 257 

Candy 238-245 

Butter creams 244 

Butter scotch 242 

Candied orange peel 244 

Caramels 238, 239 

Chocolate 238 

Cocoanutbars 242 

Cold fudge 240 

Cream chocolate 238 

Cream mints 243 

Creamed dates 241, 242 

Fudge 239 

Marshmallows 244 

Mint 243 

Peanut 241 

Bars 241 

Brittle 241 

Butter fudge 240 

Pinoche 243 

Sea foam 245 

Stuffed dates 241 

Sultana fudge 240 

Vanilla taffy 242 

Canning fruits 216 

Pineapple 217 

Rhubarb 217 

Small frufts 216 

Canning vegetables 

Beans 216 

Corn 217 

Carrots 77 

Catsup, See Pickles 



Cauliflower, Baked 76 

With tomato sauce 77 

Chafing dish recipes 250-252 

Charlotte Russe 152 

Cheese 

And nut salad 9Z 

Au gratin 78 

Balls H 

Blushing bunny 79 

Custard If* 

Dream cakes 77 

Fondu . . 78 

Macaroni -'on 

Pudding 80 

Sandwiches 

Souffle . . 79 

Schmier kase 237 

Straws m 

Toast 78 

Welsh rarebit 252 

Chestnut salad 93 

Chestnuts, Stewed 80 

Chicken 

Corn pie 41 

Corn soup lj 

Creamed 251 

Croquettes 44, 45 

Filling 39 

Filling for patties 44 

Fried 46 

Fried Maryland 46 

Fried Brown fricassee .... 46 

How to clean and truss. . . 38 

How to roast 38 

Jellied ...39, 40 

Patties, with oysters 32 

Pie 41 

Pot pie 40 

Pressed ^ 

Salad 83 

Chili Con Carni 51 

Chili sauce, See Pickles 

Chocolate 

Bavarian cream 153 

Cake, See Cake 
Candy, See Candy 

Custard 150-151 

Hot 246 

Ice cream 225 

Icing 167, 168, 169 

Pie 161 

Pudding 151 

Sauce 147 

Stain, To remove 257 

Tart 162 

Chow-chow, See Pickles 

Cider punch 248 



276 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



Cider soup 9 

Cinnamon cake and rolls 

Buns 114 

Cake 114, 120, 121 

Rolls 115 

Rusks 114 

Sweet cakes. 121 

Toast . 121 

Circus punch 247 

Clam chowder 10 

Clams, Deviled 24 

Clams, Stewed 24 

Codfish 271 

Coffee 246 

Cake 175 

Cake Moravian 114 

Hot sauce 147 

Stain To remove 257 

Conserves .218-222 

Amber marmalade 218 

Cherry honey 219 220 

Citron preserved 219 

Grape fru timarmalade. . . 221 

Green grape conserve 220 

Jams 222 

Pineapple and cherry mar- 
malade 220 

Pineapple and strawberry 

conserve 220 

Rhubarb conserve 222 

Pineapple honey 220 

Quince chips 221 

Quincy honey 221 

Strawberry h oney 219 

Strawberry preserves 219 

Cookies See Cakes, Small 

Corn cob syrup 222 

Corn 

Chowder . . 70 

Chow chow 99 

Escalloped with beans. ... 71 

Fritters 70 

Oysters 70 

Pudding 69, 70 

Soup , 14 

Cream of 15 17 

Green 15 

Chicken 15 

Without meat 15 

To can 217 

Corn meal bread 

Green pone 119 

Hasty pudding. 142 

Indian pudding. ......... 136 

Muffins 128 

Mush 120, 231 

Pone .118, 119 



Spider 119 

Spoon 119 

Cough syrup 259, 260 

Crab 

Cakes 26 

Deviled 25, 26 

Hard shell 25, 26 

Soft shell 25 

Crackers, See Cakes, Small 

Cranberry jelly 35 

Sauce 35 

Syrup 249 

Cream cake, See Cakes 
Cream candy, See Candy 
Cream 

Chocolate Bavarian 153 

Ice 223 

Marshmallow 150 

Mock ice 150 

Pie 161 

Pudding 143 

Puffs 143, 144, 145 

Sauce 34 

Slaw 86 

Spanish 153 

Vanilla snow 154 

Whipped 152 

Croquettes 

Chicken 44, 45 

Egg 62 

Fish 21 

Meat 53 

Potato 67 

Rice 80 

Salmon 21, 22 

Sweet potato 68 

Veal 45, 57 

Crullers or Doughnuts. 232-234 . 
See also Fat cakes 

Cucumbers, Fried 74 

Pickled 99, 100 

Stewed 74 

Custards 

Baked 149 

Chocolate ....150, 151 

Grozen 223 

Pecan 148 

See also Desserts, Pies 

Desserts 

Bisque 150 

Charlotte Russe 152 

Chocolate Bavarian cream 153 

Chocolate custard 150 

Cream puffs 143, 144, 145 

Custard, Baked 149 

Chocolate 150, 151 

Pecan 148 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 277 



Dumplings, Boiled cherry. 138 

Egg 138 

Floating island 150 

Fruit meringue 148 

Fruit, Stewed 63 

Marshmallow cream 150 

Milk jelly 153 

Mock ice cream 150 

Moonshine 140 

Peach a la Paris 151 

Pears, Baked 64 

Pecan custard 148 

Pineapple dessert 148 

Prune ship 148 

Puffs 129, 130, 144, 145 

Rice apples 133 

Spanish cream 153 

Vanilla snow cream 154 

Whipped cream 152 

Desserts, See also Puddings, 
Pies, Short cakes, Tarts. 

Dolly in the blanket 141 

Doughnuts, See Crullers, 
Fastnachts 

Duck, See Fowl 

Dumplings 

Boiled cherry 138 

Egg 138 

Potato 228 

Yankee dropped 43 

Eggs 58-62 

Baked 60 

Beauregard 60 

Boiling, Time for 58 

Chops . 61 

Creamed 62 

Croquettes 62 

Custard p e 162 

Deviled 61 

Dumpl ngs 138 

Flakes 62 

Fritters 58 

Meat loaf with. . 53 

Omelet 58, 59, 60 

Oyster 60 

Salad 87 

Sauce . . . 34 

Soup 9 

Scrambled w th ham 61 

Smothered ". 61 

\Snow : 61 

'Soup 9 

stuffed 61 

To preserve 58 

W th escalloped potatoes. 66 

Egg plant, Stuffed 74 



Fastnachts 234, 235 

See also Crullers 

Fat cakes 232 

See also Crullers 
Filling for cakes, See Icnigs 

Filling for fowl 39, 42, 43 

Fireless cooker, Recipes for. 265 

Fish 19-35 

Bro'led 20 

Croquettes 21 

Clam Chowder 10 

Deviled 24 

Stewed 24 

Codfish ; 271 

Crab Cakes 26 

Deviled 25, 26 

Hard shell 25, 26 

Soft shell 25 

Dressing for one fish 33 

Frogs 27 

Halibut en coquille ..... ; .. . 21 

Lobster 26 

Salmon, Chops 22 

Croquettes 21, 22 

Devi ed 23 

Loaf . ... 23 

Loaf 23 

, Pudding 23 

Salad 84 

Sauce 33-35 

Shad, Baked 20 

Planked 20 

Shrimp and tomato 

salad 89 

Shrimp wiggle. . . 27 

Fish, See also Oysters 

Floating island 150 

Fowl 

Duck, Roast AX, 42 

Goose, Roast .; . • 42 

How to clean and truss. . . 38 

How to roast 38 

Quail on toast , . 43 

Turkey filling w«m5.) 43 

Turkey scallop 42 

Fowl, See also Chicken 
Fri^d Cakes, See also Crullers 

Fastnachts 
Fritters 

•&pple • »I53 

•Corn I . . . ..v.> ;70 

-Egg ! u0uW 

French . . .64 

Oyster awc&l 

Potato 67 

Rice 80 

Virginia 64 



278 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



Frogs 27 

Frostings, See Icings 
Fruit cakes, See Cakes 

Fruit je y : 218 

Meringue 148 

Pudding, See Pudding 

Punch 247 

Saad 91 

Stewed 63 

Stain, To remove 257 

Funne cakes 236 

Game, See Rabbit, Raccoon, 

Squirrel 
Gems, See Muffins 
Ginger bread and cakes. 210-215 
Aunt Susan Hauer s gmger 

nuts 212 

Drop cakes 211 

Gmger bread 213, 214 

Fairy 213 

Kitty's 215 

Ginger cake 214 

Crackers 212, 213 

Drops 210 

Snaps 212 

Mrs. Etzler's cakes 210 

Goose, See Fowl 

Grape juice 246 

Grass stain, To remove 257 

Grease stain, To remove . 257, 258 
Griddle cakes 

Bread 125 

Buckwheat 126 

Flannel 126 

Halibut en coquille 21 

Ham, Baked with potatoes 49, 50 
Baked in old Virginia 

style 49 

Boiled 49 

Sugar cure for 50 

To preserve 50 

Hash, Browned 51 

Hermits 208 

Household hints 253-259 

Ice cream 

Bisque 226 

Caramel 226 

Chocolate 225 

Custard, Frozen 223 

Mint 225 

Mousse, Cherry 224 

Peach 225 

Orange souffle 226 

Strawberry 226 

Tom and Jerry. . 223 

Vanilla 225 



Ices 

Frozen strawberries. 223 

Lemon ice 224 

Pineapple water ice 224 

Sherbert, Currant 224 

Lemon 224 

Peach 223 

Icings and cake fillings. . 167-169 

Butter 167 

Caramel 169 

Chocolate 167, 169 

Chocolate filling 168 

Co d Chocoalte 167 

Cream chocolate 167 

Marshmallow 168, 169 

Plain 168 

Ink stain, To remove 257 

Iodine stain, To remove. . . . 257 

Iron rust, To remove 257 

Irish stew 48 

Jams, See Conserves 

Javelle water for staftis 258 

Jelly, Berry 218 

Cranberry 35 

Fruit 218 

Jumbles, See Cakes, Small 

Kale 75 

Kisses, See Cakes, Small 

Lamb chops 252 

Lemon 

Butter 146 

Cake 185 

Cheese 222 

Crackers 209 

Sauce 146 

Pie 156-8 

Sherbet 224 

Tart 158 

Toast 232 

Lemonade, Marshmallow. . . 248 

Spiced 243 

Lima beans 71 

Liver, Baked. . 48 

With bacon 251 

Lobster 26 

Macaroons, See Cakes, Small 
Marmalades, See Conserves 
Marshmallow and butter 

thins 2 07 

Marshmallow cake 184, 185 

Cream 15 

Candy, See Candy 

Icing 168, 169 

Measures, Table of, for cook- 
ing 124 

Meat 37-57 

Bacon, Southern style. ... 49 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



279 



Balls 53 

Beef brownies 52 

Cannelon 51 

Dried 251 

Patties 54 

Pot roast 55, 230 

Roll 54 

Roll "Rollardin" 231 

Beefsteak, Baked 51, 52 

French baked 52 

Chili Con Carni 51 

Croquettes, Chicken. . .44, 45 

Veal 45, 57 

Ham, Baked with pota- 
toes 49, 50 

Baked m old Virginia 

style 49 

Boiled 49 

Sugar cure for 50 

To preserve 50 

Hash, Browned 51 

Lamb chops 252 

Liver, Baked. . . ■ 48 

With bacon 251 

Loaf, Beef 55 

Meat with eggs 53 

Mixed meat 54 

Pork and beef 54 

Veal 47 

Mince 155 

Mock duck 53 

Mock terrapin 48 

Pickle for beef 51 

Pickle for pork 50 

Pot roast 55 

Spiced 55 

Rabbit, Fried 43 

Racoon, Miles Sterner's 

roasted 44 

Sausage, Lean 230 

Seasoning 50 

Scrap cakes 54 

Scrapple 229 

Spareribs, Roast 48 

Squirrel pot pie 44 

Stew, Irish 48 

Sweetbreads, Boiled 251 

Fried 48 

Stewed 47 

Salad 84 

Tongue, Baked 55 

Veal, Ca,ke 56 

Croquettes 45, 57 

Cutlets, Breaded 56 

Loaf 47 

Pie 56 

Pressed 46, 57 



Zitterlmg (Souse) 237 

Meat, Time for cooking. ... 37 
Meat, See also Chicken, Fowl 

M ldew, To remove. 257 

Milk jelly 153 

Mince meat 155 

Green, tomato 97 

Mock bisque soup . 18 

Mock cherry pie 163 

Mock duck 53 

Mock ice cream 150 

Mock lady cake. 199 

Mock terrapin 48 

Mock turtle soup 17 

Molasses crumb cake . . 237 

Moonshine 140 

Moravian coffee cake ,,, 114 

Mousse, Cherry 224 

Peach , • • • 225 

Muffins 

Corn 128 

Cup puffs 129 

Graham 130 

Graham gems 126, 127 

Minnie Hartman s 127 

Oatmeal 130 

Rag 128 

Raisin 129 

Twin mountain 127 

Wheat 127 

Muffins, See also Biscuits, 
Pop overs, Waffles. 

Mush .120, 231 

Mutton broth 17 

Noodles 16 

Italian 81 

Schmeltz 229 

Soup... ... 16 

Virginia 81 

With tomato sauce. . 81 



Nut bread, See Bread 
Nut cakes, See Cake 
Nut candy, See Candy 
Nut salad, See Salads 

Nuts, Almonds 227 

Nuts, See also, Chestnuts 

Onion cake 228 

Onions, Creamed 70 

Escalloped 71 

Stuffed Spanish 71 

Orange cake, See Cake 

Orange souffle 226 

Orange pudding. ....... 149, 151 

Orange peel, Candied. .... 244 

Oysters 27 

Bellevue stew 250 

Broiled, with brown sauce . 29 



280 



HANOVER COOK BOOK. 



Cocktail 28 

Corn oysters 70 

Creamed 28, 250 

Escalloped 29 

Fried 29, 30 

Fritters 31 

Macaroni and 31 

Omelet 60 

On half shell 28 

Panned 250 

Patties 31, 32 

With chicken 32 

Pickled 32 

Pie 30 

Pigs in a blanket 30 

Soup 16 

Pan cakes, See Griddle cakes 

Parsnips 76 

Pastry for pie 155 

Pastry for tart or custard. . . 155 

Pastry, Puff 155 

Peach a la Paris 151 

Peach Puddihg 138, 139 

Peach Sauce 105 

Peach Sherbet 223 

Peach Shortcake 139 

Peaches, Spiced 105 

Peaches, Sweet pickled 105 

Pears, Baked 64 

Pears, Spiked 106 

Penna. German difehes. .228-237 

Apple Butter 231 

Beef pot roast 230 

Beef roll "Rollajdin .... 231 

Corn meal mush 231 

Crullers 234 

Crumb pie 237 

Doughnuts 232, 233 

Fastnachts 234, 235 

Fat cakes 232 

Funnel cakes 236 

German potato soup 230 

Hot slaw 231 

Lemon toast 232 

Molasses crumb cztke 237 

Onion cake 228 

Pigs in blanket 229 

Potato dumplings 228 

Sauerkraut 228 

Sausage, Lean 230 

Scra,pple 229 

Schmeltz noodles 229 

Schmi'er kase 237 

Schneckenhaus In 236 

Schnitts and knep 230 

Snow balls . 234 

Tangled jackets 232 



Zitterling (Souse) 237 

Peppers, Stuffed 76 

Relish 104 

Pickles 94-105 

Canteloupe, Pickled 103 

Spiced 103 

Sweet pickled 103 

Catsup 

Cold . . 101 

Tomato 101, 102 

Chili sauce. 94, 95 

Chow chow 95, 96 

Corn 99 

Cucumber 99 

Cucumber 99, 100 

For beef 51 

For pork 50 

Green tomato mince meat . 97 
Green tomato pickle. . . .96, 97 

Green tomato soy 102 

Martynias 102 

Mixed 97, 98, 99, 101 

Mustard 98 

Peaches, Spiced 105 

Sweet pickled 105 

Pears, Spiced 106 

Pepper relfeh 104 

Piccalilli 95 

Spiced canteloupe 103 

Peaches 105 

Pears 106 

Sweet pickle for all fruit ... 94 
Sweet pickled canteloupe. 103 
Sweet pickled peaches. . . . 105 
Sweet pickled watermelon 103 

Virginia cabbage 98 

Watermelon, Sweet pickled 103 

Pie i . . 155-166 

Ambrosia custard 162 

Apple custard 163 

Butter scotch 164, 165 

Caramel 165 

Carrot custard 164 

Cheese custard 164 

Chocolate 161 

Chocolate custard 161 

Cinnamon . 165 

Cocoanut custard 159 

Cream 161 

Crumb 162, 163, 237 

Custard 

Apple 163 

Carrot 164 

Cheese 164 

Chocolate 161 

Cocoanut 159 

Egg 162 



HANOVER COOK BOOK 



281 



Lemon 156, 157 

Pineapple 164 

Pumpkin 160 

Egg custard 162 

Jelly 164 

Lemon 156 8 

Cheese 222 

Custard 156, 157 

Meringue 156 

Rhubarb 166 

With two crusts 158 

Mince meat . .155, 156 

Green tomato 97 

Mock cherry 163 

Montgomery 163 

Pastry for one pie 155 

Pastry, puff 155 

Pineapple custard 164 

Puff paste. . . 155 

Pumpkin 159, 160 

Custard 159 

Rhubarb 166 

Sugar crumb 163 

Sweet potato 160 

Pies, See also Tarts 

Pigs in' a blanket 30, 229 

Poison, Antidotes for 258 

Pone, Corn, See Corn meal 
bread 

Pop overs 130 

Pot roast 55, 230 

Potato 65-69 

Browned 68 

Croquettes 67 

Dumplings 228 

Escalloped 66 

Escajloped with eggs 66 

French frifed 66 

Fricassee 67 

Fritters 67 

Hashed browned 66 

Lyonna;ise 67 

Majors white 65 

Pockets 116 

Puree 14 

Soup, German 230 

Sa^ad 85 

Saratoga chips 66 

Potatoes, Sweet 

Candied 68 

Croquettes 68 

Glazed 69 

Pie 160 

Puffs . 69 

Preserves, See Conserves 

Prune puddilig . . 141 

Whip . 148 



Pudding 132 

Apples, Baked. 140 

Float 140 

Rice 133 

Stuffed with nuts 140 

Tapioca 133 

Ash bolton , 142 

Balked 132 

Batter 132 

Berry or cherry 138 

Blackberry 136 

Blackberry mush 136 

Boiled 132 

Bread 134 

Brown Betty. 143 

Cherry 138 

Chocolate .............. 151 

Cracker 135 

Cottage 135 

Cream 143 

Dark . 142 

Delicate 149 

Dried apricot 139 

Fruit 140 

Gelatine 152 

Ha)sty 142 

Huckleberry 136, 137 

Indian 136 

Lady finger 143 

Orange 149, 151 

Peach . .138, 139 

Philadelphia 132 

Plum 142 

Prune 141 

Queen of . . . 134 

Raspberry 137 

Rice . .133, 134 

Tapioca 132 

Tapioca apple 133 

Whortleberry 141 

Pudding sauce, See Sauce 

Puff paste 155 

Puffs 129, 130, 144, 145 

Punch, See Beverages 

Quail on toast 43 

Rabbit, Fried 43 

Raccoon, Miles Sterner s 

roasted 44 

Raisin bread 108 

Ca^e 181 

Muffins 129 

Puffs 129 

Tea 247 

Raspberry puddihg. 137 

Shortcake 137 

Vftiegar 247 



282 



HANOVER COOE BOOK 



Relishes, See Pickles 

Rhubarb conserve 222 

Fizz 249 

How to can 217 

Pie 166 

Rifce apples 133 

Croquettes with orange 

sauce 80 

Fritters 80 

Pudding 133, 134 

Spanish 80 

Rolls 112 

Barrington rusks 113 

Cinnamon buns 114 

Cinnamon rolls 115 

Finger 112 

French 112, 113 

Hot 112 

Leb an on rusks 113 

Milk Ill 

Parker house 112 

Potato pockets 116 

Potato rolls 115, 116 

Puffs 129 

Raisin puffs 129 

Vienna Ill 

Rolls, See also Biscuits, 

Bread, Cinnamon cake 

Rusks, See Rolls 

Rusty gas stove, Treatment 

for 258 

Salads 83-93 

Asparagus 87 

Vinegarette 87 

Banana 90 

Beet 87 

Cabbage 85, 86 

With boiled dressing. . . 86 

Cheese and nut 92 

Cherry and nut 92 

Chestnut 93 

Chicken 83 

Egg 87 

French fruit 91 

Fruit ' . . 91 

Fruit and nut 90 

Fruit with dressing 92 

Nut 93 

Pineapple 90 

Potato 85 

Salmon 84 

Shrimp and tomato 89 

Surprise . 89 

Sweetbread 84 

Tomato and celery 89 

And shrimp 89 

Aspic 88 



Celery and pepper 88 

Stuffed 88 

Twenty-four-hour '91 

Waldorf 90 

Winter 90 

Salad dressing 82 

French 82 

French with Roquefort 

cheese 82 

Fruit salad dressing 83 

Mayonnaise without oil. . 82 

Sally Lunn. 130 

Salmon chops 22 

Croquettes .21, 22 

Deviled 23 

Loaf 23 

Pudding 23 

Salad 84 

Salsify 77 

Sand tajts 202 

Saratoga chips 66 

Sandwiches 122 

Cheese 123 

Dainty 122 

Mint cucumber 122 

Olive and celery 122 

Peanut •. . . 123 

Sauce 

Brown 34 

Cherry 104 

Chocolate 147 

Coffee 147 

Cranberry 35 

Cream 34 

Creamy 147 

Egg 34 

Drawn butter 33 

Hard 146 

Lemon 146 

Meringue 147 

Mint 33, 34 

Peach 105 

Plum 105 

Tomato 35 

White 33, 251 

Sauerkraut 228 

Sausage, Lean 230 

Sausage seasoning 50 

Schmier kase 237 

Schneckenhaus'ln 236 

Schnitts and knep 230 

Scones, Scotch 203 

Scrap cakes 54 

Scrapple 229 

Shad, Baked 2o 

Planked 2q 



HANOVER 



Sherbet, See Ices 
Short cake 

Peach 139 

Raspberry 137 

Strawberry 137 

Shrimp and tomato salad. . . 89 

Shrimp wiggle 27 

Sick, Cookery for 261, 262 

Slaw, Cream 86 

French 86 

Hot 231 

Snow balls 234 

Soup 

Asparagus 13 

Bean 9 

Bouillon 250 

Calfs head 11 

Cider 9 

Chicken corn 15 

Clam chowder 10 

Corn 14, 15 

Cream of celery 13 

Cream of corn 15, 17 

Cream of pea 9 

Cream of tomato 13 

Egg 9 

Green corn 15 

Maryland terrapin 17 

Mock bisque 18 

Mock turtle 17 

Mutton broth 17 

Noodle 16 

Oyster 16 

Potato puree 14 

Potato, German 230 

Rivel 11 

Stock 8 

Thickening for 8 

Tomato 12, 13 

Turtle 14 

Vegetable 14 

Spanish cream 153 

Spareribs 48 

Spinach 75 

Spoon bread, See Corn meal 
bread 

Squash, Fried 75 

Squfrrel pot pie 44 

Stains, Removal of 257, 258 

Strawberry 

Conserve with pineapple. . 220 

Frozen 223 

Honey 219 

Ice cream 226 

Preserves 219 

Shortcake 137 



OOK BOOK 283 

Stew, Bellevue 250 

Irish 48 

Sweetbreads 

Broiled 251 

Fried 48 

Salad 84 

Stewed 47 

Sweet potatoes, See Potatoes, 
Sweet 

Tangled jackets 232 

Tapioca 

Apple 133 

Jelly (for sick) 247 

Puddftig 132, 133 

Tar stain, Removal of 258 

Tarts 

Chocolate 162 

Lemon 158 

Pastry 155 

Tea 246 

Cake 121, 201 

Punch 248 

Stain, To remove 257 

Terrapin soup 17 

Tobacco stain, To remove. . . 257 

Tomato 

And celery salad 89 

And shrimp salad 89 

Aspic 88 

Catsup, See Pickles 

Celery and pepper salad. . 88 

Salad 88 

Sauce 35 

Soup 12, 13 

Tomatoes, Fried 73 

Escalloped 73 

Tongue, Baked 55 

Turkey, See Fowl 

Turtle soup 14 

Veal 

Cake 56 

Croquettes 45, 57 

Cutlets 56 

Loaf 47 

Pie 56 

Pressed 46, 57 

Vegetable soup 14 



Vegetables, Time for cooking 65 
Vegetables, See names of 

special Vegetables. 
Wafers, See Cakes, Small 



Waffles 125 

Wedding anniversaries 253 

Welsh rarebit 252 

White sauce 33, 251 

Zitterling (Souse) 237